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Thread: Re: Fresh Pasta worth the trouble?

  1. #1
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Fresh Pasta worth the trouble?


    "Anthony Ferrante" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I have never had freshly made pasta noodles, but after watching all
    > the time and effort it takes to make it, I think I will stick with the
    > stuff from the store, Of course, the better brands, not the cheap
    > crap. This video from Youtube showed me how involved the process
    > really is:
    >
    > http://youtube.com/watch?v=_5PMUKP5E9c
    >


    My sister used to make this regularly, and I can tell you, it is just that
    involved. The end product, to me, was so-so. It never seemed to be
    al dente, though her cooking times were low.

    I cannot imagine going through all that for pasta.

    I might do it for some special, say, spinach or beet pasta. But probably
    not as long as someone was selling it somewhere.



  2. #2
    MJB Guest

    Default Re: Fresh Pasta worth the trouble?


    "cybercat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:fqc6kr$hg7$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Anthony Ferrante" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >>I have never had freshly made pasta noodles, but after watching all
    >> the time and effort it takes to make it, I think I will stick with the
    >> stuff from the store, Of course, the better brands, not the cheap
    >> crap. This video from Youtube showed me how involved the process
    >> really is:
    >>
    >> http://youtube.com/watch?v=_5PMUKP5E9c
    >>

    >
    > My sister used to make this regularly, and I can tell you, it is just that
    > involved. The end product, to me, was so-so. It never seemed to be
    > al dente, though her cooking times were low.
    >
    > I cannot imagine going through all that for pasta.
    >
    > I might do it for some special, say, spinach or beet pasta. But probably
    > not as long as someone was selling it somewhere.
    >


    You know what is so funny - I've been planning to make fresh-raviolli for
    the first time - using a very similar pasta machine for the first time -
    since before Christmas. But I'd put-off trying it because I was utterly
    intimidated because I'd never done any of it before. Then I watched the
    video and all I could think was 'that looks sooo easy - and hardly any work
    at all.' So I'll be buying some veal tonight for the filling and making it
    tomorrow.

    <grin>

    Maybe I'll feel differently in a few days. But right now that video segment
    fills me with a sense of hope and confidence, not dread.

    MJB



  3. #3
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Fresh Pasta worth the trouble?

    cybercat <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Anthony Ferrante" <[email protected]> wrote in message


    >>I have never had freshly made pasta noodles, but after watching all
    >> the time and effort it takes to make it, I think I will stick with the
    >> stuff from the store


    >My sister used to make this regularly, and I can tell you, it is just that
    >involved. The end product, to me, was so-so. It never seemed to be
    >al dente, though her cooking times were low.


    Yes, that would be the main problem with fresh pasta -- it's too
    soft for dishes that are better with al dente pasta.

    Try making macaroni and cheese with fresh pasta and having it
    not come out a globular mess.

    Steve

  4. #4
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Fresh Pasta worth the trouble?

    On Sun, 2 Mar 2008 01:28:59 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve
    Pope) wrote:


    >Yes, that would be the main problem with fresh pasta -- it's too
    >soft for dishes that are better with al dente pasta.
    >
    >Try making macaroni and cheese with fresh pasta and having it
    >not come out a globular mess.
    >
    >Steve


    What a lot of folks seem to forget is that some pasta dishes are
    actually better with dried pasta. Even such noted cooks as Marcella
    Hazan, and Lidia Bastianich say that both have their purposes in that
    some pasta dishes should be made with fresh pasta, and others with
    dried. Sometimes it doesn't matter.

    Christine

  5. #5
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Fresh Pasta worth the trouble?

    On Sun, 2 Mar 2008 11:18:21 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    snippage of conversation
    >
    >Lasagna in my neighborhood is thinnest sheets of egg pasta with lightest of
    >tomato sauces and a sprinkling of cheese. Cooks vie to see whose can be the
    >lightest not the most rib sticking.


    One of my favorite restaurants is Cafe Mediterraneo.
    http://kokoscorner.typepad.com/mycor..._to_bring.html

    They have a lasagna like how you describe. I haven't had that yet but
    my friend loves it. The sheets of pasta are sooooo thin and there's a
    minimum amount of sauce. It's a vegetarian lasagna and they use a
    bechamel rather than tomato sauce.
    I keep meaning to order it but have fallen in love with the Tutto Mari
    and the artichoke pizza. I'll try it next time.

    koko
    ---
    http://www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 2/24
    "There is no love more sincere than the love of food"
    George Bernard Shaw

  6. #6
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Fresh Pasta worth the trouble?

    Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio


    >> [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote:


    >>>Yes, that would be the main problem with fresh pasta -- it's too
    >>>soft for dishes that are better with al dente pasta.
    >>>
    >>>Try making macaroni and cheese with fresh pasta and having it
    >>>not come out a globular mess.


    >> What a lot of folks seem to forget is that some pasta dishes are
    >> actually better with dried pasta. Even such noted cooks as Marcella
    >> Hazan, and Lidia Bastianich say that both have their purposes in that
    >> some pasta dishes should be made with fresh pasta, and others with
    >> dried. Sometimes it doesn't matter.


    > The two pastas taste different! How could they not with an egg
    > in there? Some dishes are not good with that egg flavor, some need it.


    Just as a datapoint, not all fresh pasta contains egg. The
    fresh pasta shop local to me (Phoenix, in Berkeley) makes whole-wheat,
    eggless, vegan pasta. I buy it frequently.

    Steve

  7. #7
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Fresh Pasta worth the trouble?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In the typical Italian kitchen it is merely 100 g of 00 soft wheat flour,


    Judith, is soft wheat flour the same as America's all-purpose flour or
    is it cake flour? Or is it just *not* semolina?

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com; I Think I've Seen it All, 2/24/2008

  8. #8
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Fresh Pasta worth the trouble?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Lasagna in my neighborhood is thinnest sheets of egg pasta with lightest of
    > tomato sauces and a sprinkling of cheese. Cooks vie to see whose can be the
    > lightest not the most rib sticking.


    I had that type of lasagne in Tuscany. It was heavenly. I love pasta
    and the thin sheets used in the layering were so good! The sauce not
    thick and meaty. Cheese only on top as you say. Ah, sweet memories.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com; I Think I've Seen it All, 2/24/2008

  9. #9
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Fresh Pasta worth the trouble?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:
    > One of my favorite restaurants is Cafe Mediterraneo.
    > http://kokoscorner.typepad.com/mycor..._to_bring.html
    >
    > They have a lasagna like how you describe. I haven't had that yet but
    > my friend loves it. The sheets of pasta are sooooo thin and there's a
    > minimum amount of sauce. It's a vegetarian lasagna and they use a
    > bechamel rather than tomato sauce.


    You must! Do!
    >
    > koko
    > ---


    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com; I Think I've Seen it All, 2/24/2008

  10. #10
    Charlotte L. Blackmer Guest

    Default Re: Fresh Pasta worth the trouble?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> In the typical Italian kitchen it is merely 100 g of 00 soft wheat flour,

    >
    >Judith, is soft wheat flour the same as America's all-purpose flour or
    >is it cake flour? Or is it just *not* semolina?


    I'm not Judith, but I know that 00 wheat flour is different from both
    American all-purpose (which has a lot of "hard" wheat in it) and cake flour -
    more "gluteny" than cake flour.

    King Arthur Flour sells it, and can probably tell you much more about the
    specific differences, but it's probably tough to find on store
    shelves here (while it's probably widely available in Italy). I suspect
    you could use a mix of regular US and cake flour to approximate it (if you
    didn't want to just work out how to do it with regular flour).

    (Of course now I'm wondering if, say, a mix of King Arthur and White Lily
    would do the trick, but I can't get White Lily on my grocery shelves,
    either.

    Charlotte

    --

  11. #11
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Fresh Pasta worth the trouble?


    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Lasagna in my neighborhood is thinnest sheets of egg pasta with lightest
    >> of
    >> tomato sauces and a sprinkling of cheese. Cooks vie to see whose can be
    >> the
    >> lightest not the most rib sticking.

    >
    > I had that type of lasagne in Tuscany. It was heavenly. I love pasta
    > and the thin sheets used in the layering were so good! The sauce not
    > thick and meaty. Cheese only on top as you say. Ah, sweet memories.


    When I lived in CA, I could get some spinach and cheese ravioli that was
    made with really thin sheets of pasta. You could almost see through it. I
    loved that stuff because for the carb count, I could eat a lot more of it
    than I could the regular kind.



  12. #12
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Fresh Pasta worth the trouble?


    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Lasagna in my neighborhood is thinnest sheets of egg pasta with lightest
    >> of
    >> tomato sauces and a sprinkling of cheese. Cooks vie to see whose can be
    >> the
    >> lightest not the most rib sticking.

    >
    > I had that type of lasagne in Tuscany. It was heavenly. I love pasta
    > and the thin sheets used in the layering were so good! The sauce not
    > thick and meaty. Cheese only on top as you say. Ah, sweet memories.
    >
    > --
    > -Barb, Mother Superior,


    Here's something you might like. Roll the pasta out as thin as possible, to
    the highest number. When making the last topping sheet, take one ultrathin
    sheet, lay washed and dried fresh herb leaves on it and lay another sheet
    over, then run it through the roller one last time. Put that on the top of
    the lasagna. It's gorgeous.

    --
    http://www.judithgreenwood.com



  13. #13
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Fresh Pasta worth the trouble?


    "Charlotte L. Blackmer" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:fqflqn$rfc$[email protected]..
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    >>Judith, is soft wheat flour the same as America's all-purpose flour or
    >>is it cake flour? Or is it just *not* semolina?

    >
    > I'm not Judith, but I know that 00 wheat flour is different from both
    > American all-purpose (which has a lot of "hard" wheat in it) and cake
    > flour -
    > more "gluteny" than cake flour.
    > (Of course now I'm wondering if, say, a mix of King Arthur and White Lily
    > would do the trick, but I can't get White Lily on my grocery shelves,
    > either.
    >
    > Charlotte


    Really, for making pasta and pizza don't bother. For decades before I moved
    here I used plain all purpose flour and never had a single problem. For no
    egg I used semolina with a bit of oil and that was no problem either.

    Homemade egg pasta is mommy food here. No one goes to enormous trouble.
    They spend much more time getting it rolled really thin and delicate than on
    anything else. My neighbors tend to make it up when the eggs are over
    plentiful or when tradition demands stuffed pastas.

    --
    http://www.judithgreenwood.com



  14. #14
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Fresh Pasta worth the trouble?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Here's something you might like. Roll the pasta out as thin as possible, to
    > the highest number. When making the last topping sheet, take one ultrathin
    > sheet, lay washed and dried fresh herb leaves on it and lay another sheet
    > over, then run it through the roller one last time. Put that on the top of
    > the lasagna. It's gorgeous.


    Thanks, Judith. Fine Cooking magazine had instructions for doing that
    some years back. I think they used flat-leaf parsley. I've never done
    it but, strangely, have been thinking about it for a while (maybe
    because of all the egg noodles I've made and all the use the machine has
    been getting).
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com; I Think I've Seen it All, 2/24/2008

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