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Thread: Re-dried beans

  1. #1
    Silvar Beitel Guest

    Default Re-dried beans

    You read that right: Re-*dried* beans, not re-fried.

    What do you get if you take cooked beans and dehydrate them? Do they
    go back to being rock-hard like the originals or will they rehydrate
    quickly and be soft? (If the latter, they'd be a good ingredient for
    camping/backpacking, being light-weight, no refrigeration needed,
    minimal fuel to cook.)

    Toying with cooking plans for spring trips ...

    --
    Silvar Beitel

  2. #2
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Re-dried beans


    On 27-Mar-2010, Silvar Beitel <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What do you get if you take cooked beans and dehydrate them? Do they
    > go back to being rock-hard like the originals or will they rehydrate
    > quickly and be soft? (If the latter, they'd be a good ingredient for
    > camping/backpacking, being light-weight, no refrigeration needed,
    > minimal fuel to cook.)


    In 1968 I was a medic in the US Army in the Republic of Vietnam and served
    with a recon unit of the 1st Cavalry. Our rations were a bit different than
    those of the typical soldier; instead of C-rations (canned stuff), we
    received freeze-dried rations because they were lighter, thus we could
    carry more and need resupply less often.

    Among the meal assortment was one germain to your questions; Chili with
    Beans. The idea was to open the pack, pour in water, stir it around and let
    it sit long enough for the meal to absorb the water. No matter what I did
    to prepare the Chili with Beans meal, I could never get the beans to soften,
    they were always crunchy. The most extreme method of preparation was to
    pick every single bean out of the meal, put them in my canteen cup with the
    water before putting the cup over a heat tab (or C-4) to bring the water to
    a boil.

    Then beans were never again soft as cooked beans should be - they always
    were crunchy, like a peanut.

    So, if you are going to dehydrate beans and want they to ever be soft again,
    my opinion is to not dry them thoroughly - take them only to
    dried-apricot/prune/raisin level of dry. Of course, that may not be so good
    at preserving the beans, but at least you stand a chance they won't crunch.
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  3. #3
    Samantha Hill Guest

    Default Re: Re-dried beans

    Silvar Beitel wrote:
    >
    > What do you get if you take cooked beans and dehydrate them? Do they
    > go back to being rock-hard like the originals or will they rehydrate
    > quickly and be soft? (If the latter, they'd be a good ingredient for
    > camping/backpacking, being light-weight, no refrigeration needed,
    > minimal fuel to cook.)



    You can buy dried refried bean mix and dried bean soup (split pea, black
    bean, etc.) dried soup mixes that do exactly this. I used to buy them
    in bulk from a whole foods coop. I think they slice the beans thinly or
    pulverize them so they rehydrate well. I think it would be difficult
    and/or time-consuming to rehydrate a whole dried bean.

    I have bought dehydrated fruits and veggies from Walton Feed
    (waltonfeed.com) and they have soup mixes, too, but not the kind I
    mentioned above, and their bouillon to me is yucky, although their
    vegetable soup mix -- veggies and cubed potatoes -- is fantastic.

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