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Thread: Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

  1. #1
    Glanbrok Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

    Thanks for the tip. I don't have a thermometer. Is there another way to judge when it's cooked enough?

  2. #2
    Nad R Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

    Glanbrok <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Thanks for the tip. I don't have a thermometer. Is there another way to
    > judge when it's cooked enough?


    Not being an expert, if one really makes enough of candy making one can go
    by the thickness, color and shininess of the candy. But that is more art
    than science.
    Otherwise experience is the best option without a thermometer.

    If you plan on getting a candy thermometer, I think you will find the
    infrared ones better than the probes. The probes are always getting a
    coating on them that throws off the temperature. With the probes I find
    myself constantly wiping them clean to get an accurate reading. Hmmm that
    is my opinion but I am not an expert at this.

    http://best3reviews.com/255/how-to-f...stomer-reviews

    --
    Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

  3. #3
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

    On Thu, 21 Jul 2011 20:06:27 +0000 (UTC), Nad R
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Glanbrok <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Thanks for the tip. I don't have a thermometer. Is there another way to
    >> judge when it's cooked enough?

    >
    >Not being an expert, if one really makes enough of candy making one can go
    >by the thickness, color and shininess of the candy. But that is more art
    >than science.
    >Otherwise experience is the best option without a thermometer.
    >
    >If you plan on getting a candy thermometer, I think you will find the
    >infrared ones better than the probes. The probes are always getting a
    >coating on them that throws off the temperature. With the probes I find
    >myself constantly wiping them clean to get an accurate reading. Hmmm that
    >is my opinion but I am not an expert at this.
    >
    >http://best3reviews.com/255/how-to-f...stomer-reviews



    IR thermometers are great for *surface* temp-- but I don't think they
    would be of much use for candy making.

    This page gives a bit of a work around to having a thermometer. [soft
    ball, hard ball, etc]
    http://whatscookingamerica.net/Candy/candytemp.htm

    There is a link there to candy thermometers which shows a bunch-
    starting at $10 or so. *Well* worth having around. Especially
    when you're starting [or don't do it often] and can't go by feel.

    Jim

  4. #4
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

    On Jul 21, 3:06*pm, Nad R <n...@positivegogetter.cooldude> wrote:
    > Glanbrok <glanb...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > Thanks for the tip. I don't have a thermometer. Is there another way to
    > > judge when it's cooked enough?

    >
    > Not being an expert, if one really makes enough of candy making one can go
    > by the thickness, color and shininess of the candy. But that is more art
    > than science.
    > Otherwise experience is the best option without a thermometer.
    >
    > If you plan on getting a candy thermometer, I think you will find the
    > infrared ones better than the probes. The probes are always getting a
    > coating on them that throws off the temperature. With the probes I find
    > myself constantly wiping them clean to get an accurate reading. Hmmm that
    > is my opinion but I am not an expert at this.
    >
    > http://best3reviews.com/255/how-to-f...ed-thermometer...
    >
    > --
    > Enjoy Life... Nad R *(Garden in zone 5a Michigan)


    Infrared? Nawww! I use the old fashioned kind; full immersion mercury
    glass tube!

    http://www.preparedpantry.com/Produc...andyThermo.jpg

    John Kuthe...

  5. #5
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help


    "John Kuthe" <> wrote
    On Jul 21, 3:06 pm, Nad R <> wrote:
    > Glanbrok <> wrote:
    > > Thanks for the tip. I don't have a thermometer. Is there another way to
    > > judge when it's cooked enough?

    >
    > Not being an expert, if one really makes enough of candy making one can go
    > by the thickness, color and shininess of the candy. But that is more art
    > than science.
    > Otherwise experience is the best option without a thermometer.
    >
    > If you plan on getting a candy thermometer, I think you will find the
    > infrared ones better than the probes. The probes are always getting a
    > coating on them that throws off the temperature. With the probes I find
    > myself constantly wiping them clean to get an accurate reading. Hmmm that
    > is my opinion but I am not an expert at this.
    >
    > http://best3reviews.com/255/how-to-f...ed-thermometer...
    >
    > --
    > Enjoy Life... Nad R

    Infrared? Nawww! I use the old fashioned kind; full immersion mercury
    glass tube!

    http://www.preparedpantry.com/Produc...andyThermo.jpg

    John Kuthe...

    Where did we get with that? Is an infrared thermometer a helpful tool in
    candy making or not? Another issue that candy recipes seldom mention is
    humidity. If you just must make fudge on a rainy day, plan to cook it a
    little longer or serve it on ice cream or cake - or both. Setting a pan of
    candy on the floor of a nice cold bathtub over night often will cause it to
    set up nicely. That is, of course, if you have a bathroom door that the cat
    can't open. ( We once had a kitty with his very own set of burglar tools.)
    Polly


  6. #6
    Nad R Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

    "Polly Esther" <Pollynot@c[email protected]> wrote:
    > "John Kuthe" <> wrote
    > On Jul 21, 3:06 pm, Nad R <> wrote:
    >> Glanbrok <> wrote:
    >>> Thanks for the tip. I don't have a thermometer. Is there another way to
    >>> judge when it's cooked enough?

    >>
    >> Not being an expert, if one really makes enough of candy making one can go
    >> by the thickness, color and shininess of the candy. But that is more art
    >> than science.
    >> Otherwise experience is the best option without a thermometer.
    >>
    >> If you plan on getting a candy thermometer, I think you will find the
    >> infrared ones better than the probes. The probes are always getting a
    >> coating on them that throws off the temperature. With the probes I find
    >> myself constantly wiping them clean to get an accurate reading. Hmmm that
    >> is my opinion but I am not an expert at this.
    >>
    >> http://best3reviews.com/255/how-to-f...ed-thermometer...
    >>
    >> --
    >> Enjoy Life... Nad R

    > Infrared? Nawww! I use the old fashioned kind; full immersion mercury
    > glass tube!
    >
    > http://www.preparedpantry.com/Produc...andyThermo.jpg
    >
    > John Kuthe...
    >
    > Where did we get with that? Is an infrared thermometer a helpful tool in
    > candy making or not? Another issue that candy recipes seldom mention is
    > humidity. If you just must make fudge on a rainy day, plan to cook it a
    > little longer or serve it on ice cream or cake - or both. Setting a pan
    > of candy on the floor of a nice cold bathtub over night often will cause
    > it to set up nicely. That is, of course, if you have a bathroom door
    > that the cat can't open. ( We once had a kitty with his very own set of
    > burglar tools.) Polly


    To me the probes get in the way of stirring, they do not seem to be as
    accurate.
    For fudge making only perhaps a cheap old fashion one will do. But it seems
    that the infrared has many more uses. If one is going to buy one for the
    first time, I think the newer infrared would be neat to have.

    When I use the old fashion probes there is a build up of candy on the
    probes. They are more near the sides of the container, when I put my
    instant probe for a double check the instant read often shows a higher
    temp. If I clean off the old style probe, clean it and reinsert, the
    temperature quickly matches the instant read ones.

    --
    Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

  7. #7
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

    Nad R <[email protected]> wrote:
    -snip-
    >
    >To me the probes get in the way of stirring, they do not seem to be as
    >accurate.


    I've *used* mine to stir with. Not as accurate as what?

    >For fudge making only perhaps a cheap old fashion one will do. But it seems
    >that the infrared has many more uses. If one is going to buy one for the
    >first time, I think the newer infrared would be neat to have.


    Have you used an infrared for candy? Just for giggles yesterday I
    put a pot of water on the stove and tried to take it's temp with my
    infrared. Water is clear, so I got the temp of the bottom of the
    pan. The heat index was over 100 yesterday so playing with fire
    wasn't high on my list-- but I'm going to make some fudge next week
    just to see if the IR is useless, or just less convenient for fudge.

    >
    >When I use the old fashion probes there is a build up of candy on the
    >probes. They are more near the sides of the container, when I put my
    >instant probe for a double check the instant read often shows a higher
    >temp. If I clean off the old style probe, clean it and reinsert, the
    >temperature quickly matches the instant read ones.


    What kind of candy are you making? Stuff in the 270F+ range? I'll
    admit I don't go there often-- but for fudge and syrups, I've never
    had that problem with my old glass $5 deal-
    http://www.amazon.com/Chef-Craft-212...dp/B00440D3OC/

    What style thermometer do you have?

    Jim

  8. #8
    Nad R Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

    Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Nad R <[email protected]> wrote:
    > -snip-
    >>
    >> To me the probes get in the way of stirring, they do not seem to be as
    >> accurate.

    >
    > I've *used* mine to stir with. Not as accurate as what?
    >
    >> For fudge making only perhaps a cheap old fashion one will do. But it seems
    >> that the infrared has many more uses. If one is going to buy one for the
    >> first time, I think the newer infrared would be neat to have.

    >
    > Have you used an infrared for candy? Just for giggles yesterday I
    > put a pot of water on the stove and tried to take it's temp with my
    > infrared. Water is clear, so I got the temp of the bottom of the
    > pan. The heat index was over 100 yesterday so playing with fire
    > wasn't high on my list-- but I'm going to make some fudge next week
    > just to see if the IR is useless, or just less convenient for fudge.
    >
    >>
    >> When I use the old fashion probes there is a build up of candy on the
    >> probes. They are more near the sides of the container, when I put my
    >> instant probe for a double check the instant read often shows a higher
    >> temp. If I clean off the old style probe, clean it and reinsert, the
    >> temperature quickly matches the instant read ones.

    >
    > What kind of candy are you making? Stuff in the 270F+ range? I'll
    > admit I don't go there often-- but for fudge and syrups, I've never
    > had that problem with my old glass $5 deal-
    > http://www.amazon.com/Chef-Craft-212...dp/B00440D3OC/
    >
    > What style thermometer do you have?


    I have two thermometers. The work horse from thermoworks. And another from
    sur la table advertised for candy making also well as meat. Useless for
    candy making as the buildup of candy on the probe even tho it advertised
    for candy making.

    http://www.surlatable.com/product/PR...be-Thermometer

    http://www.thermoworks.com/products/...thermapen.html

    I do not have an infrared yet, I want one! I have seen some you tube videos
    of people using them for tempering chocolate. If so why not for fudge. I
    cannot stir with the digital probes. But yes, I do make brittle also and
    found only the instant probe is useful. I keep thinking about the infrared
    ones for candy making.

    If you have an infrared why have you not tried this before?
    And what kind and make do you have?

    I do not want a drawer full of temperature probes, one for this style of
    candy and another for that kind... I can see the instant probes for meats
    but for candy making A surface temperature seems like it would work best?

    In the infrared reviews, the article states it has it uses for chocolate
    making. I will probably get one of those listed in the article. But like
    Sur La Table on there probe I found it useless for candy making.

    http://best3reviews.com/255/how-to-f...stomer-reviews

    I will be very very interested in your findings if the infrared
    thermometers work for fudge. If they do I will get one my self the next
    day.

    I give you credit in asking if I had one

    --
    Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

  9. #9
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help


    "Nad R" <>
    > I do not have an infrared yet, I want one! I have seen some you tube
    > videos
    > of people using them for tempering chocolate. If so why not for fudge. I
    > cannot stir with the digital probes. But yes, I do make brittle also and
    > found only the instant probe is useful. I keep thinking about the infrared
    > ones for candy making.
    >
    > If you have an infrared why have you not tried this before?
    > And what kind and make do you have?
    >
    > I do not want a drawer full of temperature probes, one for this style of
    > candy and another for that kind... I can see the instant probes for meats
    > but for candy making A surface temperature seems like it would work best?
    >
    > In the infrared reviews, the article states it has it uses for chocolate
    > making. I will probably get one of those listed in the article. But like
    > Sur La Table on there probe I found it useless for candy making.
    >
    > http://best3reviews.com/255/how-to-f...stomer-reviews
    >
    > I will be very very interested in your findings if the infrared
    > thermometers work for fudge. If they do I will get one my self the next
    > day.
    >
    > I give you credit in asking if I had one
    > Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)


    And a word of warning. I bought one that I'd seen AB use. Don't remember
    its brand and didn't read the instructions until too late. That thermometer
    was shaped sort of like a plain old school 12" ruler. The instructions said
    to 'temper' it - that is, to put into really Hot water before putting it
    into even hotter candy. I didn't. I should have. Polly



  10. #10
    Nad R Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

    "Polly Esther" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Nad R" <>
    >> I do not have an infrared yet, I want one! I have seen some you tube > videos
    >> of people using them for tempering chocolate. If so why not for fudge. I
    >> cannot stir with the digital probes. But yes, I do make brittle also and
    >> found only the instant probe is useful. I keep thinking about the infrared
    >> ones for candy making.
    >>
    >> If you have an infrared why have you not tried this before?
    >> And what kind and make do you have?
    >>
    >> I do not want a drawer full of temperature probes, one for this style of
    >> candy and another for that kind... I can see the instant probes for meats
    >> but for candy making A surface temperature seems like it would work best?
    >>
    >> In the infrared reviews, the article states it has it uses for chocolate
    >> making. I will probably get one of those listed in the article. But like
    >> Sur La Table on there probe I found it useless for candy making.
    >>
    >> http://best3reviews.com/255/how-to-f...stomer-reviews
    >>
    >> I will be very very interested in your findings if the infrared
    >> thermometers work for fudge. If they do I will get one my self the next
    >> day.
    >>
    >> I give you credit in asking if I had one
    >> Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

    >
    > And a word of warning. I bought one that I'd seen AB use. Don't
    > remember its brand and didn't read the instructions until too late. That
    > thermometer was shaped sort of like a plain old school 12" ruler. The
    > instructions said to 'temper' it - that is, to put into really Hot water
    > before putting it into even hotter candy. I didn't. I should have. Polly


    Polly, You submerged an electronic device into hot water????
    I always read the owners manuals for everything before use and I always go
    by the manual.

    --
    Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

  11. #11
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help


    "Nad R" <> wrote in message >
    Polly Esther" <> wrote:
    >> >>

    >> And a word of warning. I bought one that I'd seen AB use. Don't
    >> remember its brand and didn't read the instructions until too late. That
    >> thermometer was shaped sort of like a plain old school 12" ruler. The
    >> instructions said to 'temper' it - that is, to put into really Hot water
    >> before putting it into even hotter candy. I didn't. I should have.
    >> Polly

    >
    > Polly, You submerged an electronic device into hot water????
    > I always read the owners manuals for everything before use and I always go
    > by the manual.


    NOoooo. It wasn't an electronic one. It was the long flat sort that AB
    used when he demonstrated how to make wonderful onion rings and he declared
    that the frying oil temp had to be 'just so'. Polly


  12. #12
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

    Nad R <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]> wrote:

    -snip-
    >>
    >> What style thermometer do you have?

    >
    >I have two thermometers. The work horse from thermoworks. And another from
    >sur la table advertised for candy making also well as meat. Useless for
    >candy making as the buildup of candy on the probe even tho it advertised
    >for candy making.
    >
    >http://www.surlatable.com/product/PR...be-Thermometer
    >
    >http://www.thermoworks.com/products/...thermapen.html


    Wonder if the metal probe is the bugaboo? John and I both have glass
    & don't seem to have the problem of buildup.

    >
    >I do not have an infrared yet, I want one!


    I've seen them at Harbor Freight for $25-30.

    > I have seen some you tube videos
    >of people using them for tempering chocolate. If so why not for fudge.


    My first thought is that it is just taking surface temp & with fudge,
    the temp is rising rapidly so you want to know what's going on down
    where you're stirring. The other thing is-- you need to be holding
    the thermometer in one hand while stirring with the other. [and
    I've been happy with what has been working for me, so I haven't
    considered changing]

    >I
    >cannot stir with the digital probes. But yes, I do make brittle also and
    >found only the instant probe is useful. I keep thinking about the infrared
    >ones for candy making.
    >
    >If you have an infrared why have you not tried this before?


    Never felt the need.

    >And what kind and make do you have?


    It is a Fluke 62 mini. [I see they are still around for about $100]
    I can vouch for its durability- I've dropped it, dunked it, kicked it,
    and lost it for months at a time. I don't even remember ever
    changing the batteries in it, though I might have.

    It is an antique in the world of IR thermometers, I think. My wife
    got it 10-15 years ago when the hospital thought it would be a good
    idea to take psychiatric patient's temperatures with a laser pointed
    at their temple. That didn't last long, so she brought it home for
    me to play with. I use it in the shop- found some missing
    insulation with it- tuned up my heating system ductwork, etc. The
    only use I've ever had for it in the kitchen was checking surface
    temps of my pizza stone.

    >I do not want a drawer full of temperature probes, one for this style of
    >candy and another for that kind... I can see the instant probes for meats
    >but for candy making A surface temperature seems like it would work best?


    Lessee-- I've got the cheap glass candy thermometer, a 'dairy
    thermometer'- [no idea why- maybe I made cheese once] a couple of
    instant probes, and my remote smoker thermometer in the drawer. [the
    IR lives in the shop]
    >
    >In the infrared reviews, the article states it has it uses for chocolate
    >making. I will probably get one of those listed in the article. But like
    >Sur La Table on there probe I found it useless for candy making.
    >
    >http://best3reviews.com/255/how-to-f...stomer-reviews


    I can see how it might be useful for monitoring tempering chocolate--
    a very gentle process with not a lot of temp variations. Just not
    sure of how practical it is for cooking candy.

    I note that the page also says "even to make sure that the baby’s
    bathwater is neither too hot nor too cold." I told you my results
    of taking water temp yesterday- so I know that statement is *dead*
    wrong. Not to mention that a hand is the best thing to measure baby
    bath water.<g>


    >
    >I will be very very interested in your findings if the infrared
    >thermometers work for fudge. If they do I will get one my self the next
    >day.
    >


    In the interest of science I pledge to make some fudge as soon as the
    outside temp drops to 80 or so.<g>

    Jim

















  13. #13
    Nad R Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

    Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> I will be very very interested in your findings if the infrared
    >> thermometers work for fudge. If they do I will get one my self the next
    >> day.
    >>

    >
    > In the interest of science I pledge to make some fudge as soon as the
    > outside temp drops to 80 or so.<g>
    >
    > Jim


    Five bucks is cheap, I may get one of those glass probes. The one that
    stays in candy works great for meats in the oven, just not for candy. But I
    do love the instant read, it does work well and fast. I just poke it in the
    goo, and a second or two, I get a reading.

    My fudge recipes are from the book,

    http://www.amazon.com/Chocolates-Con...1369397&sr=1-1

    The negative is every time I insert the instant probe, I have to wipe the
    chocolate or very hot sticky brittle off. The brittles are pain to remove
    each time. I dip the probe tip in hot water then wipe. An infrared would
    end one more cleaning up processes. I am getting better at it. To the point
    I have a good idea when it is done without a probe, it is the the techie in
    me that wants a precise measure.

    The plain fudge I make uses cream and no water and no powdered milk.
    Also I found the type of sugar seems to make a difference in texture, I use
    a fine grain bakers sugar for all candy making and for baking. What I read
    that beet sugar is not the best for candy making. I want the cain sugar.
    My fudge also uses a small amount of clear corn syrup.

    Not enough sugar can make the fudge too soft also and humidity is a factor.
    But I always read that water and chocolate making does not really go well
    together.

    --
    Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

  14. #14
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

    On Jul 22, 4:35*pm, Nad R <n...@positivegogetter.cooldude> wrote:
    > Jim Elbrecht <elbre...@email.com> wrote:
    > >> I will be very very interested in your findings if the infrared
    > >> thermometers work for fudge. If they do I will get one my self the next
    > >> day.

    >
    > > In the interest of science I pledge to make some fudge as soon as the
    > > outside temp drops to 80 or so.<g>

    >
    > > Jim

    >
    > Five bucks is cheap, I may get one of those glass probes. The one that
    > stays in candy works great for meats in the oven, just not for candy. ButI
    > do love the instant read, it does work well and fast. I just poke it in the
    > goo, and a second or two, I get a reading.
    >
    > My fudge recipes are from the book,
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/Chocolates-Con...nstitute-Ameri...
    >
    > The negative is every time I insert the instant probe, I have to wipe the
    > chocolate or very hot sticky brittle off. The brittles are pain to remove
    > each time. I dip the probe tip in hot water then wipe. An infrared would
    > end one more cleaning up processes. ...


    I use my candy thermometer for making my fondant (cooked to 242F) and
    English Toffee (cooked to 310F) and with each I just clip the
    thermometer onto inside of the pan as I begin the cook and stor with a
    wooden spoon. That way I get a constant indication of the temp of the
    syrup. And cleanup is cleanup. I gotta do it anyway, so the
    thermometer is just another part to clean up.

    John Kuthe...

  15. #15
    Nad R Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

    John Kuthe <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Jul 22, 4:35 pm, Nad R <n...@positivegogetter.cooldude> wrote:
    >> Jim Elbrecht <elbre...@email.com> wrote:
    >>>> I will be very very interested in your findings if the infrared
    >>>> thermometers work for fudge. If they do I will get one my self the next
    >>>> day.

    >>
    >>> In the interest of science I pledge to make some fudge as soon as the
    >>> outside temp drops to 80 or so.<g>

    >>
    >>> Jim

    >>
    >> Five bucks is cheap, I may get one of those glass probes. The one that
    >> stays in candy works great for meats in the oven, just not for candy. But I
    >> do love the instant read, it does work well and fast. I just poke it in the
    >> goo, and a second or two, I get a reading.
    >>
    >> My fudge recipes are from the book,
    >>
    >> http://www.amazon.com/Chocolates-Con...nstitute-Ameri...
    >>
    >> The negative is every time I insert the instant probe, I have to wipe the
    >> chocolate or very hot sticky brittle off. The brittles are pain to remove
    >> each time. I dip the probe tip in hot water then wipe. An infrared would
    >> end one more cleaning up processes. ...

    >
    > I use my candy thermometer for making my fondant (cooked to 242F) and
    > English Toffee (cooked to 310F) and with each I just clip the
    > thermometer onto inside of the pan as I begin the cook and stor with a
    > wooden spoon. That way I get a constant indication of the temp of the
    > syrup. And cleanup is cleanup. I gotta do it anyway, so the
    > thermometer is just another part to clean up.
    >
    > John Kuthe...


    If you have an instant read thermometer, use it to double check the other
    thermometer, just to check for accuracy. Just to see if they match up. I
    found I was over cooking some candies, so used the instant for double
    checking. I may get a cheap candy thermometer next month and see if the
    glass ones are better.

    --
    Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

  16. #16
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

    On Jul 23, 5:13*pm, Nad R <n...@positivegogetter.cooldude> wrote:
    > John Kuthe <johnkuth...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > On Jul 22, 4:35 pm, Nad R <n...@positivegogetter.cooldude> wrote:
    > >> Jim Elbrecht <elbre...@email.com> wrote:
    > >>>> I will be very very interested in your findings if the infrared
    > >>>> thermometers work for fudge. If they do I will get one my self the next
    > >>>> day.

    >
    > >>> In the interest of science I pledge to make some fudge as soon as the
    > >>> outside temp drops to 80 or so.<g>

    >
    > >>> Jim

    >
    > >> Five bucks is cheap, I may get one of those glass probes. The one that
    > >> stays in candy works great for meats in the oven, just not for candy. But I
    > >> do love the instant read, it does work well and fast. I just poke it in the
    > >> goo, and a second or two, I get a reading.

    >
    > >> My fudge recipes are from the book,

    >
    > >>http://www.amazon.com/Chocolates-Con...nstitute-Ameri....

    >
    > >> The negative is every time I insert the instant probe, I have to wipe the
    > >> chocolate or very hot sticky brittle off. The brittles are pain to remove
    > >> each time. I dip the probe tip in hot water then wipe. An infrared would
    > >> end one more cleaning up processes. ...

    >
    > > I use my candy thermometer for making my fondant (cooked to 242F) and
    > > English Toffee (cooked to 310F) and with each I just clip the
    > > thermometer onto inside of the pan as I begin the cook and stor with a
    > > wooden spoon. That way I get a constant indication of the temp of the
    > > syrup. And cleanup is cleanup. I gotta do it anyway, so the
    > > thermometer is just another part to clean up.

    >
    > > John Kuthe...

    >
    > If you have an instant read thermometer, use it to double check the other
    > thermometer, just to check for accuracy. Just to see if they match up. I
    > found I was over cooking some candies, so used the instant for double
    > checking. I may get a cheap candy thermometer next month and see if the
    > glass ones are better.
    >
    > --
    > Enjoy Life... Nad R *(Garden in zone 5a Michigan)


    I've always calibrated my candy thermometer to the standard of boiling
    water, which should read 212F or 100C. Problem is the new thermometer
    I have does not allow the glass tube to be slid in the metal mounting
    frame! :-( So I just have to make a mental note of how far off it is
    and in which direction.

    John Kuthe...

  17. #17
    Nad R Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

    John Kuthe <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I've always calibrated my candy thermometer to the standard of boiling
    > water, which should read 212F or 100C. Problem is the new thermometer
    > I have does not allow the glass tube to be slid in the metal mounting
    > frame! :-( So I just have to make a mental note of how far off it is
    > and in which direction.
    >
    > John Kuthe...


    Not calibration I am thinking of. Does a coating build up on the
    thermometer during cooking that throws it off. Water will not build up a
    coating.

    --
    Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

  18. #18
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help

    On Jul 23, 6:04*pm, Nad R <n...@positivegogetter.cooldude> wrote:
    > John Kuthe <johnkuth...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > I've always calibrated my candy thermometer to the standard of boiling
    > > water, which should read 212F or 100C. Problem is the new thermometer
    > > I have does not allow the glass tube to be slid in the metal mounting
    > > frame! :-( So I just have to make a mental note of how far off it is
    > > and in which direction.

    >
    > > John Kuthe...

    >
    > Not calibration I am thinking of. Does a coating build up on the
    > thermometer during cooking that throws it off. Water will not build up a
    > coating.
    >
    > --
    > Enjoy Life... Nad R *(Garden in zone 5a Michigan)


    No, no coating builds up. I stir the syrup through the thermometer
    bulb housing as I stir, particularly with the toffee which gets very
    thick as it approaches 310F. The fondant syrup that I cook to 242F is
    much more fluid, and I don't stir it as it cooks. I just let the
    boiling action circulate the syrup through and around the thermometer
    bulb. After all, the thermometer is at the same temp as the syrup so
    keeps it fluid.

    John Kuthe...

  19. #19
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default IR thermometer & fudge results [was; Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help]

    On Fri, 22 Jul 2011 21:35:02 +0000 (UTC), Nad R
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>> I will be very very interested in your findings if the infrared
    >>> thermometers work for fudge. If they do I will get one my self the next
    >>> day.
    >>>

    >>
    >> In the interest of science I pledge to make some fudge as soon as the
    >> outside temp drops to 80 or so.<g>


    82 is close enough-- You had me Jonesin' for da fudge for a week.
    >
    >My fudge recipes are from the book,
    >
    >http://www.amazon.com/Chocolates-Con...1369397&sr=1-1


    I found it on Google and used one of their recipes-- Espresso Fudge.

    Step one- bring it to 236 degrees. I immediately realized that
    there are a whole lot of 'currents' going on in boiling sugar.

    At first the range, as I swept the IR over the surface was 111-178
    degrees. Once we got over 200 that evened out a bit and it finally
    got down to 223-225 when my glass bulb [that had been hanging in the
    pan the whole time] said 236.

    For me, at that stage, I'll stick with my glass bulb. I can pick my
    nose and stir the pot if I feel the need-- the IR takes up one hand
    and I need to keep shooting it.

    Stage 2-- Cool to 120. [the book only gives a time in some recipes
    and gives the temp in others-- it is all about temp, IMO- so that's
    what I monitored]

    I poured it into a glass 9x13 casserole to cool. It has been so long
    since I made fudge I didn't place it on a rack, so sitting on my
    wooden table slowed the cooling process some. And I had the glass
    bulb on the bottom of the dish-- so it never got below 136 before it
    looked right and I went to the next stage.

    Again the IR gave a huge range of temps all over the surface. It
    started at 198-202 when I first poured it-- but 8 minutes later it was
    143-171. At the 17 minute mark there was a 30 degree spread. [and the
    hot and cool spots moved around- though I never stirred it at this
    point. At 33 minutes it was down to 109-134 & 'looked right'. So
    I dumped it in the KA.

    Stage 3 was mix for 3 minutes "or until the shine goes away". I
    didn't see mention of what temp that would be but it would have been
    nice because *here* is where I think the IR is really handy. Because
    things are being mixed constantly, it gave a good solid reading-
    starting at 119 when I thought of it. 15 minutes later [after some
    cooling of the bowl when things were going too slow for me] the shine
    faded at 107 degrees.

    Just thought to check the pan-- The kitchen is around 85 now & the pan
    is 89-90.5. ]
    >
    >The negative is every time I insert the instant probe, I have to wipe the
    >chocolate or very hot sticky brittle off. The brittles are pain to remove
    >each time. I dip the probe tip in hot water then wipe. An infrared would
    >end one more cleaning up processes. I am getting better at it. To the point
    >I have a good idea when it is done without a probe, it is the the techie in
    >me that wants a precise measure.


    I leave the glass candy thermometer in until I'm done-- then put it in
    the bowl to dissolve the sugar-- an hour later, I wash them easily.

    If you're techie enough to want to look at all the numbers, I've got
    temps on an xl sheet. Copy/pastes to Usenet lose all formatting- but
    I can email it to you.

    >The plain fudge I make uses cream and no water and no powdered milk.
    >Also I found the type of sugar seems to make a difference in texture, I use
    >a fine grain bakers sugar for all candy making and for baking. What I read
    >that beet sugar is not the best for candy making. I want the cain sugar.
    >My fudge also uses a small amount of clear corn syrup.


    Sounds like this recipe-- I used granulated cane sugar. The pan,
    once cooled had a bit of grain in it-- but the bowl, after cooling and
    mixing had a great texture. [and flavor] Another hour or two should
    tell if the finished fudge is worth eating for science.<g>

    Jim

  20. #20
    Nad R Guest

    Default Re: IR thermometer & fudge results [was; Re: Chocolate Fudge too soft -- please help]

    Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Fri, 22 Jul 2011 21:35:02 +0000 (UTC), Nad R
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>> I will be very very interested in your findings if the infrared
    >>>> thermometers work for fudge. If they do I will get one my self the next
    >>>> day.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> In the interest of science I pledge to make some fudge as soon as the
    >>> outside temp drops to 80 or so.<g>

    >
    > 82 is close enough-- You had me Jonesin' for da fudge for a week.
    >>
    >> My fudge recipes are from the book,
    >>
    >> http://www.amazon.com/Chocolates-Con...1369397&sr=1-1

    >
    > I found it on Google and used one of their recipes-- Espresso Fudge.
    >
    > Step one- bring it to 236 degrees. I immediately realized that
    > there are a whole lot of 'currents' going on in boiling sugar.
    >
    > At first the range, as I swept the IR over the surface was 111-178
    > degrees. Once we got over 200 that evened out a bit and it finally
    > got down to 223-225 when my glass bulb [that had been hanging in the
    > pan the whole time] said 236.
    >
    > For me, at that stage, I'll stick with my glass bulb. I can pick my
    > nose and stir the pot if I feel the need-- the IR takes up one hand
    > and I need to keep shooting it.
    >
    > Stage 2-- Cool to 120. [the book only gives a time in some recipes
    > and gives the temp in others-- it is all about temp, IMO- so that's
    > what I monitored]
    >
    > I poured it into a glass 9x13 casserole to cool. It has been so long
    > since I made fudge I didn't place it on a rack, so sitting on my
    > wooden table slowed the cooling process some. And I had the glass
    > bulb on the bottom of the dish-- so it never got below 136 before it
    > looked right and I went to the next stage.
    >
    > Again the IR gave a huge range of temps all over the surface. It
    > started at 198-202 when I first poured it-- but 8 minutes later it was
    > 143-171. At the 17 minute mark there was a 30 degree spread. [and the
    > hot and cool spots moved around- though I never stirred it at this
    > point. At 33 minutes it was down to 109-134 & 'looked right'. So
    > I dumped it in the KA.
    >
    > Stage 3 was mix for 3 minutes "or until the shine goes away". I
    > didn't see mention of what temp that would be but it would have been
    > nice because *here* is where I think the IR is really handy. Because
    > things are being mixed constantly, it gave a good solid reading-
    > starting at 119 when I thought of it. 15 minutes later [after some
    > cooling of the bowl when things were going too slow for me] the shine
    > faded at 107 degrees.
    >
    > Just thought to check the pan-- The kitchen is around 85 now & the pan
    > is 89-90.5. ]
    >>
    >> The negative is every time I insert the instant probe, I have to wipe the
    >> chocolate or very hot sticky brittle off. The brittles are pain to remove
    >> each time. I dip the probe tip in hot water then wipe. An infrared would
    >> end one more cleaning up processes. I am getting better at it. To the point
    >> I have a good idea when it is done without a probe, it is the the techie in
    >> me that wants a precise measure.

    >
    > I leave the glass candy thermometer in until I'm done-- then put it in
    > the bowl to dissolve the sugar-- an hour later, I wash them easily.
    >
    > If you're techie enough to want to look at all the numbers, I've got
    > temps on an xl sheet. Copy/pastes to Usenet lose all formatting- but
    > I can email it to you.
    >
    >> The plain fudge I make uses cream and no water and no powdered milk.
    >> Also I found the type of sugar seems to make a difference in texture, I use
    >> a fine grain bakers sugar for all candy making and for baking. What I read
    >> that beet sugar is not the best for candy making. I want the cain sugar.
    >> My fudge also uses a small amount of clear corn syrup.

    >
    > Sounds like this recipe-- I used granulated cane sugar. The pan,
    > once cooled had a bit of grain in it-- but the bowl, after cooling and
    > mixing had a great texture. [and flavor] Another hour or two should
    > tell if the finished fudge is worth eating for science.<g>
    >
    > Jim


    Thank you for that information. It is very helpful. My metal candy probe
    was showing almost twenty degrees lower from my instant read. Your glass
    probe was almost on the money. I was over cooking much of my candy at first
    until I got the instant read thermometer.

    I thank you very much I think you saved me allot of money. I am going to
    get a standard glass candy thermometer. I do find your results interesting,
    holding the IR while reading has it's points.

    Their is another item you have that I am a bit we jealous of. That last
    three minutes in the KA mixer. My mixer is a wooden spoon, it takes allot,
    I mean allot of elbow grease until the shine is gone I can feel the
    pump in my arm afterwords.

    For three minutes is it worth the KA and clean up.
    My arm hurts just thinking about it

    --
    Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

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