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Thread: Re: Block Party!

  1. #1
    Mr. Bill Guest

    Default Re: Block Party!

    Went to a one room grade school in Michigan from 1953-1961. My kids think I grew up on "Little House on the Prairie".

    We all enjoyed PBJ.....there wasn't mass hysteria about nut allergies...when did school kids start food allergies? I suspect that bottle feeding promoted food allergy...since we didn't have natural immunities from "mom's milk".

  2. #2
    cshenk Guest

    Default Allergies, was: Block Party!

    "Mr. Bill" wrote

    > We all enjoyed PBJ.....there wasn't mass hysteria about nut
    > allergies...when did school kids start food allergies?
    > I suspect that bottle feeding promoted food allergy...since we didn't have
    > natural immunities from "mom's milk".


    There are several foods that shouldn't be fed to infants until a certain age
    or alleric reactions (and other issues) are much more common. Peanuts are
    one of them. Combine this with the idea some had almost as a fad for a bit
    to feed toddlers earlier than they really are ready for, on solids and you
    start having problems. Bottle feeding alone isn't it. The natural
    'immunities' from mommie's own best brand have more to do with getting sick
    than with allergic reactions.

    My mom gave me simple advice with Charlotte. 'Until she has teeth coming
    in, consider pureed foods as a sideline and keep it simple like peas,
    carrots and mashed potatoes. Nothing with nuts, eggs or honey.' Charlotte
    has no allergies at all and likes just about everything just like me. In
    her case, new foods were introduced at age appropriate intervals and we
    didn't try to 'push the limit'.

    There's nothing 'advanced' about feeding a little one solids too early and
    it garners no bragging rights, but does risk that allergic reaction bit.


  3. #3
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Allergies, was: Block Party!

    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Mr. Bill" wrote
    >
    >> We all enjoyed PBJ.....there wasn't mass hysteria about nut
    >> allergies...when did school kids start food allergies?
    >> I suspect that bottle feeding promoted food allergy...since we didn't
    >> have natural immunities from "mom's milk".

    >
    > There are several foods that shouldn't be fed to infants until a
    > certain age or alleric reactions (and other issues) are much more
    > common. Peanuts are one of them. Combine this with the idea some had
    > almost as a fad for a bit to feed toddlers earlier than they really
    > are ready for, on solids and you start having problems. Bottle
    > feeding alone isn't it. The natural 'immunities' from mommie's own
    > best brand have more to do with getting sick than with allergic
    > reactions.
    >
    > My mom gave me simple advice with Charlotte. 'Until she has teeth
    > coming in, consider pureed foods as a sideline and keep it simple like
    > peas, carrots and mashed potatoes. Nothing with nuts, eggs or honey.'
    > Charlotte has no allergies at all and likes just about everything just
    > like me. In her case, new foods were introduced at age appropriate
    > intervals and we didn't try to 'push the limit'.
    >
    > There's nothing 'advanced' about feeding a little one solids too early
    > and it garners no bragging rights, but does risk that allergic
    > reaction bit.



    My cousin was a miserable baby until they finally found out he was
    allergic to milk!!! My aunt and uncle dropped dairy from his diet and he
    got well. How were they supposed to know their newborn was allergic to
    milk (both mothers and store bought)?

    I became lactose intolerant at some point in time. When I switched to
    fat-free milk the problem went away. I figured the lactose must be a
    component of the milk fat but I don't really know. I don't have problems
    with other dairy products or any other foods.

    On the subject of jarred baby foods, Gerber played a dirty trick on
    parents by putting sugar in all their baby foods. The dirty trick was,
    Gerber figured, that parents would taste the baby food to see if it
    appealed to THEM but newborns and infants have very dull taste buds so
    the added sugar didn't provide a flavor benefit and chances are it could
    lead to unnecessary levels of sugar in their blood and possibly baby
    tooth decay. Bland is grand for babies!

    Also chewy candy like Starburst, Twizzlers speeds up tooth decay by
    simply getting stuck between teeth. Melty (Hersey kisses or bars, etc.)
    or dissolving candy (lifesavers, lollypops, etc.) are the "safer"
    candies, according to a morning news TV doctor. I think it was his PSA
    to parents for Halloween. For years I gave out Startbursts and Twizzlers
    almost exclusively. Two or three of each per kid. My bad!

    Andy

  4. #4
    Nad R Guest

    Default Re: Allergies, was: Block Party!

    Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Mr. Bill" wrote
    >>
    >>> We all enjoyed PBJ.....there wasn't mass hysteria about nut
    >>> allergies...when did school kids start food allergies?
    >>> I suspect that bottle feeding promoted food allergy...since we didn't
    >>> have natural immunities from "mom's milk".

    >>
    >> There are several foods that shouldn't be fed to infants until a
    >> certain age or alleric reactions (and other issues) are much more
    >> common. Peanuts are one of them. Combine this with the idea some had
    >> almost as a fad for a bit to feed toddlers earlier than they really
    >> are ready for, on solids and you start having problems. Bottle
    >> feeding alone isn't it. The natural 'immunities' from mommie's own
    >> best brand have more to do with getting sick than with allergic
    >> reactions.
    >>
    >> My mom gave me simple advice with Charlotte. 'Until she has teeth
    >> coming in, consider pureed foods as a sideline and keep it simple like
    >> peas, carrots and mashed potatoes. Nothing with nuts, eggs or honey.'
    >> Charlotte has no allergies at all and likes just about everything just
    >> like me. In her case, new foods were introduced at age appropriate
    >> intervals and we didn't try to 'push the limit'.
    >>
    >> There's nothing 'advanced' about feeding a little one solids too early
    >> and it garners no bragging rights, but does risk that allergic
    >> reaction bit.

    >
    >
    > My cousin was a miserable baby until they finally found out he was
    > allergic to milk!!! My aunt and uncle dropped dairy from his diet and he
    > got well. How were they supposed to know their newborn was allergic to
    > milk (both mothers and store bought)?
    >
    > I became lactose intolerant at some point in time. When I switched to
    > fat-free milk the problem went away. I figured the lactose must be a
    > component of the milk fat but I don't really know. I don't have problems
    > with other dairy products or any other foods.
    >
    > On the subject of jarred baby foods, Gerber played a dirty trick on
    > parents by putting sugar in all their baby foods. The dirty trick was,
    > Gerber figured, that parents would taste the baby food to see if it
    > appealed to THEM but newborns and infants have very dull taste buds so
    > the added sugar didn't provide a flavor benefit and chances are it could
    > lead to unnecessary levels of sugar in their blood and possibly baby
    > tooth decay. Bland is grand for babies!
    >
    > Also chewy candy like Starburst, Twizzlers speeds up tooth decay by
    > simply getting stuck between teeth. Melty (Hersey kisses or bars, etc.)
    > or dissolving candy (lifesavers, lollypops, etc.) are the "safer"
    > candies, according to a morning news TV doctor. I think it was his PSA
    > to parents for Halloween. For years I gave out Startbursts and Twizzlers
    > almost exclusively. Two or three of each per kid. My bad!
    >
    > Andy


    I still think genetically modified foods may be the culprit. I think it was
    the book "Omnivores Dilemma by Pollan" that one forth of the American diet
    is from corn. Cows that are suppose to eat grass are now being feed corn
    which cows system are not well adapted to eating. Corn is feed to chickens
    and pigs. Corn is americas main sweetener. Corn is the basis of most our
    vitamins. We cook with corn as in corn oil. Corn is almost all genetically
    engineered today with what knows it is having on our Heath.

    Wheat and other foods are being changed as well and our health is the one
    that suffers. Foods that never bothered me in the past are bothering me
    today like wheat.

    --
    Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

  5. #5
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Allergies, was: Block Party!

    "Andy" wrote
    > "cshenk" wrote:


    >> There are several foods that shouldn't be fed to infants until a
    >> certain age or alleric reactions (and other issues) are much more
    >> common.


    > My cousin was a miserable baby until they finally found out he was
    > allergic to milk!!! My aunt and uncle dropped dairy from his diet and he
    > got well. How were they supposed to know their newborn was allergic to
    > milk (both mothers and store bought)?


    He probably needed to be on soy-milks then. That happens and has always
    happened. Not all babies are able to thrive on regular mommie or bottled
    baby milks (note, regular store milk by the gallon isn't quite the same and
    should not be used with infants under 1 year of age for primary feeding).

    > I became lactose intolerant at some point in time. When I switched to
    > fat-free milk the problem went away. I figured the lactose must be a
    > component of the milk fat but I don't really know. I don't have problems
    > with other dairy products or any other foods.


    That's not uncommon for adults. In fact, generally as a group most humans
    gain some level of lactose intolerance as they hit adulthood. Europeans
    tend to maintain lactose tolerance better than most and far eastern asians
    the least. It's probably somewhat evolutionary there as Europeans have used
    cheeses as a way to preserve milk for times of famine and to add to the food
    larder for a very long time. If famine hit and you couldn't eat the one
    remaining food you had access to, you starved and were less likely to
    produce more kids (grin).

    It sounds like you have a limited lactose tolerance. Very common.

    > On the subject of jarred baby foods, Gerber played a dirty trick on
    > parents by putting sugar in all their baby foods. The dirty trick was,
    > Gerber figured, that parents would taste the baby food to see if it
    > appealed to THEM but newborns and infants have very dull taste buds so
    > the added sugar didn't provide a flavor benefit and chances are it could
    > lead to unnecessary levels of sugar in their blood and possibly baby
    > tooth decay. Bland is grand for babies!


    I heard about that, but it happened after Charlotte was past that food
    stage. I didn't get many jars anyways, tending to fix instead our own then
    blendering her portion and adding butter and salt to ours after that. I'm
    trying to remember the timescale for her solids but she was mostly on infant
    powdered milk for the first 9 months, then we added more 'solids' and by age
    1 the milk became an accessory (continued to age 2 then swapped to regular
    store milk at 4% fat).

    By the time she was fully on solids, she was self feeding.

    The largest portion of baby tooth decay comes from putting the baby to bed
    with a juice or milk bottle. When Charlotte was put to bed, it was with a
    bottle of warm water which sometimes had a drop or two of lemon or lime
    concentrate but no sugar added. Mostly it was just warm water and she
    never had any of the teeth or mouth issues others commonly have.

    > Also chewy candy like Starburst, Twizzlers speeds up tooth decay by
    > simply getting stuck between teeth. Melty (Hersey kisses or bars, etc.)
    > or dissolving candy (lifesavers, lollypops, etc.) are the "safer"
    > candies, according to a morning news TV doctor. I think it was his PSA
    > to parents for Halloween. For years I gave out Startbursts and Twizzlers
    > almost exclusively. Two or three of each per kid. My bad!


    Grin, older than toddlers but i understand.


  6. #6
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Allergies, was: Block Party!

    "Nad R" wrote

    > I still think genetically modified foods may be the culprit. I think it
    > was
    > the book "Omnivores Dilemma by Pollan" that one forth of the American diet
    > is from corn. Cows that are suppose to eat grass are now being feed corn
    > which cows system are not well adapted to eating. Corn is feed to chickens
    > and pigs. Corn is americas main sweetener. Corn is the basis of most our
    > vitamins. We cook with corn as in corn oil. Corn is almost all genetically
    > engineered today with what knows it is having on our Heath.


    I think the issue is more that the corn is being used heavier than other
    things. A variety diet doesn't lead to that. It's a very Japanese aspect I
    learned there from a nutritionist. 'Eat with the seasons' is how it goes.

    Like many (most?) Americans, I'm a heinz-57 sorta gal when it comes to
    genetics. Dad's side was pure german (he was born just after they crossed
    ellis isle) but Mom's is an interesting fantastical blur of Europe, amerind,
    and africa. I have mild corn issues which is odd with the amerind
    background but it's not due to genetically modified corn.

    > Wheat and other foods are being changed as well and our health is the one
    > that suffers. Foods that never bothered me in the past are bothering me
    > today like wheat.


    As we get older, food intolerances can creap up. It doesnt happen to
    everyone but it's not that uncommon either. Lactose is the most famous one
    for this.


  7. #7
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Allergies, was: Block Party!

    FYI:

    A nut free basil pesto is available at Trader Joe's. It's called Genova
    Pesto, with a green label on the lid of a shallow clear plastic tub.

    Even without the pine nuts, it's as good as mine (a by the book classic
    recipe)!

    I'd guess they did it that way so their product would also appeal to those
    suffering nut allergies of one kind or another.

    Since TJ products vary by region, if interested, dial yours up first and
    ask about availability.

    Andy

  8. #8
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Allergies, was: Block Party!

    It's important that I immediately correct my prior post.

    There is a warning disclaimer below the ingredients stating that this
    product is made at a manufacturing facility that processes soy, peanuts and
    tree nuts.

    Dammit!

    Andy

  9. #9
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Block Party!

    Billy/Brawny/Ward wrote:

    > I suspect that bottle feeding promoted food allergy...since we didn't have
    > natural immunities from "mom's milk".


    That's ignorant.

    Bob




  10. #10
    Paco Guest

    Default Re: Allergies, was: Block Party!



    "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    > It's important that I immediately correct my prior post.
    >
    > There is a warning disclaimer below the ingredients stating that this
    > product is made at a manufacturing facility that processes soy, peanuts
    > and
    > tree nuts.
    >
    > Dammit!
    >
    > Andy


    No worries, Andy. Nobody takes your posts seriously.

    (Yes, I voted myself group spokesperson for the previous 18 seconds)


  11. #11
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Allergies, was: Block Party!


    "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    > "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Mr. Bill" wrote
    >>
    >>> We all enjoyed PBJ.....there wasn't mass hysteria about nut
    >>> allergies...when did school kids start food allergies?
    >>> I suspect that bottle feeding promoted food allergy...since we didn't
    >>> have natural immunities from "mom's milk".

    >>
    >> There are several foods that shouldn't be fed to infants until a
    >> certain age or alleric reactions (and other issues) are much more
    >> common. Peanuts are one of them. Combine this with the idea some had
    >> almost as a fad for a bit to feed toddlers earlier than they really
    >> are ready for, on solids and you start having problems. Bottle
    >> feeding alone isn't it. The natural 'immunities' from mommie's own
    >> best brand have more to do with getting sick than with allergic
    >> reactions.
    >>
    >> My mom gave me simple advice with Charlotte. 'Until she has teeth
    >> coming in, consider pureed foods as a sideline and keep it simple like
    >> peas, carrots and mashed potatoes. Nothing with nuts, eggs or honey.'
    >> Charlotte has no allergies at all and likes just about everything just
    >> like me. In her case, new foods were introduced at age appropriate
    >> intervals and we didn't try to 'push the limit'.
    >>
    >> There's nothing 'advanced' about feeding a little one solids too early
    >> and it garners no bragging rights, but does risk that allergic
    >> reaction bit.

    >
    >
    > My cousin was a miserable baby until they finally found out he was
    > allergic to milk!!! My aunt and uncle dropped dairy from his diet and he
    > got well. How were they supposed to know their newborn was allergic to
    > milk (both mothers and store bought)?
    >
    > I became lactose intolerant at some point in time. When I switched to
    > fat-free milk the problem went away. I figured the lactose must be a
    > component of the milk fat but I don't really know. I don't have problems
    > with other dairy products or any other foods.
    >
    > On the subject of jarred baby foods, Gerber played a dirty trick on
    > parents by putting sugar in all their baby foods. The dirty trick was,
    > Gerber figured, that parents would taste the baby food to see if it
    > appealed to THEM but newborns and infants have very dull taste buds so
    > the added sugar didn't provide a flavor benefit and chances are it could
    > lead to unnecessary levels of sugar in their blood and possibly baby
    > tooth decay. Bland is grand for babies!
    >
    > Also chewy candy like Starburst, Twizzlers speeds up tooth decay by
    > simply getting stuck between teeth. Melty (Hersey kisses or bars, etc.)
    > or dissolving candy (lifesavers, lollypops, etc.) are the "safer"
    > candies, according to a morning news TV doctor. I think it was his PSA
    > to parents for Halloween. For years I gave out Startbursts and Twizzlers
    > almost exclusively. Two or three of each per kid. My bad!


    I grew up chewing massive amounts of sugary gum. I have a filling in just
    about every tooth. Or I did. Lots of crowns now. You'd think my dad would
    know better. His dad was a dentist and he himself was a dental hygienist in
    the Air Force. Yet he insisted until recently that sugary gum did *not*
    cause cavities. Both he and my mom have horrible teeth. She was a big gum
    chewer back in the day. Doesn't chew it much any more but when she does she
    doesn't seem to care if it has sugar in it or not. My dad's dentist finally
    threatened him and said if he was going to chew gum it *had* to be
    sugarless. So he finally switched.

    Many years I have given out no food at all on Halloween. Only toys. I get
    them at places like Oriental Trading Company. The big winners seem to be
    small stuffed animals and rubber ducks. Lots of kids and teens have told me
    they collect rubber ducks. It worked out well when my daughter was younger
    because I could save the extras (provided they weren't obviously Halloween
    things) for school parties or even her birthday party treat bags. But now
    we have no use for them.

    I think what we will do next year is get the Fruit Snacks from Costco. Yes
    they are somewhat sticky but not as sticky as those candies you mentioned.
    I think they are healthier than candy and we will have no problem with the
    leftovers because the kids at the dance studio love them.



  12. #12
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Allergies, was: Block Party!

    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Many years I have given out no food at all on Halloween. Only toys.
    > I get them at places like Oriental Trading Company. The big winners
    > seem to be small stuffed animals and rubber ducks.



    Julie,

    For toys, one year I gave out what I call "house flys," basically nerf
    foam triblade boomerangs. They'd fly about four feet around and possibly
    tip over a toothpick. The next year I gave out Duncan Imperial plastic
    yo-yos.

    One teenage girl came back a while later and tried to trick or treat me
    again for a different color yo-yo. I asked her, "didn't I give you a yo-
    yo earlier?" She admitted so but added "but I have to accessorize!"

    I broke out laughing and let her pick the color yo-yo of her choice. She
    ran up the driveway yelling back thank yous! She didn't even ask for
    more candy! She was probably the envy of her classmates. ))

    The next Halloween, I heard from many of the yo-yo prize-winning trick
    or treaters and their parents that it caused quite a stir at the
    elementary and junior high schools.

    I was so pleased! ))

    Best,

    Andy

  13. #13
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Allergies, was: Block Party!


    "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Many years I have given out no food at all on Halloween. Only toys.
    >> I get them at places like Oriental Trading Company. The big winners
    >> seem to be small stuffed animals and rubber ducks.

    >
    >
    > Julie,
    >
    > For toys, one year I gave out what I call "house flys," basically nerf
    > foam triblade boomerangs. They'd fly about four feet around and possibly
    > tip over a toothpick. The next year I gave out Duncan Imperial plastic
    > yo-yos.
    >
    > One teenage girl came back a while later and tried to trick or treat me
    > again for a different color yo-yo. I asked her, "didn't I give you a yo-
    > yo earlier?" She admitted so but added "but I have to accessorize!"
    >
    > I broke out laughing and let her pick the color yo-yo of her choice. She
    > ran up the driveway yelling back thank yous! She didn't even ask for
    > more candy! She was probably the envy of her classmates. ))
    >
    > The next Halloween, I heard from many of the yo-yo prize-winning trick
    > or treaters and their parents that it caused quite a stir at the
    > elementary and junior high schools.
    >
    > I was so pleased! ))
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Andy


    That's funny!



  14. #14
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Allergies, was: Block Party!

    cshenk wrote:
    > "Mr. Bill" wrote
    >
    >> We all enjoyed PBJ.....there wasn't mass hysteria about nut
    >> allergies...when did school kids start food allergies?
    >> I suspect that bottle feeding promoted food allergy...since we didn't
    >> have natural immunities from "mom's milk".

    >
    > There are several foods that shouldn't be fed to infants until a certain
    > age or alleric reactions (and other issues) are much more common.
    > Peanuts are one of them. Combine this with the idea some had almost as a
    > fad for a bit to feed toddlers earlier than they really are ready for,
    > on solids and you start having problems. Bottle feeding alone isn't it.
    > The natural 'immunities' from mommie's own best brand have more to do
    > with getting sick than with allergic reactions.
    >
    > My mom gave me simple advice with Charlotte. 'Until she has teeth coming
    > in, consider pureed foods as a sideline and keep it simple like peas,
    > carrots and mashed potatoes. Nothing with nuts, eggs or honey.'
    > Charlotte has no allergies at all and likes just about everything just
    > like me. In her case, new foods were introduced at age appropriate
    > intervals and we didn't try to 'push the limit'.
    >
    > There's nothing 'advanced' about feeding a little one solids too early
    > and it garners no bragging rights, but does risk that allergic reaction
    > bit.


    Interestingly, I just heard a blip about it being wise to feed
    such things earlier!

  15. #15
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Allergies, was: Block Party!


    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "Andy" wrote
    >> "cshenk" wrote:

    >
    >>> There are several foods that shouldn't be fed to infants until a
    >>> certain age or alleric reactions (and other issues) are much more
    >>> common.

    >
    >> My cousin was a miserable baby until they finally found out he was
    >> allergic to milk!!! My aunt and uncle dropped dairy from his diet and he
    >> got well. How were they supposed to know their newborn was allergic to
    >> milk (both mothers and store bought)?

    >
    > He probably needed to be on soy-milks then. That happens and has always
    > happened. Not all babies are able to thrive on regular mommie or bottled
    > baby milks (note, regular store milk by the gallon isn't quite the same
    > and should not be used with infants under 1 year of age for primary
    > feeding).
    >

    (snippage)


    A high school friend had a baby that couldn't tolerate milk or formula (and
    for some reason she didn't - or couldn't- breast feed). She had to buy
    goat's milk. Don't ask me why but the baby didn't have a problem with
    goat's milk. (I don't think soy-milk was widely available in 1980.)

    Jill


  16. #16
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Allergies, was: Block Party!

    "jmcquown" wrote
    > "cshenk" wrote


    >> He probably needed to be on soy-milks then. That happens and has always
    >> happened. Not all babies are able to thrive on regular mommie or bottled


    > A high school friend had a baby that couldn't tolerate milk or formula
    > (and for some reason she didn't - or couldn't- breast feed). She had to
    > buy goat's milk. Don't ask me why but the baby didn't have a problem with
    > goat's milk. (I don't think soy-milk was widely available in 1980.)


    I think you are right, soy milk came out in infant versions later or at
    least the wider availability of it was later.

    On the breast feeding, there are many possible reasons. I wanted to and did
    for the first week but then the c-section went bad with an infection and I
    had to be placed on some heavy duty antibiotics which made it ill-advised to
    breast-feed. Charlotte was bottle fed the rest of the time.

    Charlotte didn't have any issues on the bottle formulas and I found out on
    some web page or book that heating the bottles is not required, just food
    safety is. From then on, she got cold from the fridge and thrived on it.
    There's some age pointers there that I don't recall clearly but has to do
    with colic and to not serve too cold before something like 2 months? Later
    age infants, if always serving warm and having colic, try cold and see if it
    eases or if always serving cold, try warm and see if it eases. Charlotte
    had the normal colic and cold eased it.

    Trial and error showed putting her to bed with a warm bottle of water eased
    her while cold did not work during that stage.


  17. #17
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Allergies, was: Block Party!

    "Jean B." wrote
    > cshenk wrote:


    >> Peanuts are one of them. Combine this with the idea some had almost as a
    >> fad for a bit to feed toddlers earlier than they really are ready for,


    >> My mom gave me simple advice with Charlotte. 'Until she has teeth coming


    >> There's nothing 'advanced' about feeding a little one solids too early
    >> and it garners no bragging rights, but does risk that allergic reaction
    >> bit.


    > Interestingly, I just heard a blip about it being wise to feed such things
    > earlier!


    ARGH! They found out that isn't very wise. Think about it. We are simple
    mammals with a larger brain and a higher intelligence but nature doesn't
    have 'infant/babies' eating things their teeth can't do yet so why should
    we?

    In a world of A-Z foods, Charlotte (and I) eat the entire alphabet and if
    there's a few not on our list it's either because we haven't found them to
    try yet, or are on the tiny list of 'didn't like that one'.



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