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Thread: Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

  1. #1
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    Dimitri wrote:

    > In England, a large cut of beef (50 to 100 pounds, depending on the size
    > of the animal) usually consisting of a double SIRLOIN. A baron of beef
    > is generally roasted only for traditional or ceremonial occasions. In
    > France, a baron refers to the saddle and two legs of lamb or mutton.
    >
    > Copyright Barron's Educational Services


    In Pittsburgh, PA back in the 60-70's we had a restaurant called Johnny
    Garneau's that had a baron of beef on the smorgasbord every night. (For
    those paying attention, yes - that's an English cut of beef on a Sweedish
    buffet in a French-sounding restaurant)

    The chef at the carving station used what appeared to be at least 20"
    granton slicer and cut to order rare, medium, or well done any thickness
    and quantity you wanted. I'd bet they went through at least two of these
    on weekend nights. They also had a whole ham at the carving station, and
    plenty of other hot entrees.

    It was the best buffet I can remember. I must have eaten there at least
    25 times over the years. I would love to go back in time and visit that
    restaurant again knowing about and appreciating food as much as I do know.
    I was probably only 14 years old the last time I ate there ~1980 or so.

    Any other Pittsbuggers remember they place? There was at least 3 of them
    "Johnny Garneau's Golden Spike": Monreoville, North Hills, 6th Street
    Downtown.

    (crossposted from AFB)

    -sw

  2. #2
    George Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    On May 7, 8:32*am, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compst> wrote:
    > Dimitri wrote:
    > > In England, a large cut of beef (50 to 100 pounds, depending on the size
    > > of the animal) usually consisting of a double SIRLOIN. A baron of beef
    > > is generally roasted only for traditional or ceremonial occasions. In
    > > France, a baron refers to the saddle and two legs of lamb or mutton.

    >
    > > Copyright Barron's Educational Services

    >
    > In Pittsburgh, PA back in the 60-70's we had a restaurant called Johnny
    > Garneau's that had a baron of beef on the smorgasbord every night. *(For
    > those paying attention, yes - that's an English cut of beef on a Sweedish
    > buffet in a French-sounding restaurant)
    >
    > The chef at the carving station used what appeared to be at least 20"
    > granton slicer and cut to order rare, medium, or well done any thickness
    > and quantity you wanted. *I'd bet they went through at least two of these
    > on weekend nights. *They also had a whole ham at the carving station, and
    > plenty of other hot entrees.
    >
    > It was the best buffet I can remember. *I must have eaten there at least
    > 25 times over the years. *I would love to go back in time and visit that
    > restaurant again knowing about and appreciating food as much as I do know..
    > * I was probably only 14 years old the last time I ate there ~1980 or so.
    >
    > Any other Pittsbuggers remember they place? *There was at least 3 of them
    > "Johnny Garneau's Golden Spike": Monreoville, North Hills, 6th Street
    > Downtown.
    >
    > (crossposted from AFB)
    >
    > -sw


    I remember the Golden Spike on 6th street. I ate there a couple of
    times, great food.

  3. #3
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > Dimitri wrote:
    >
    >> In England, a large cut of beef (50 to 100 pounds, depending on the
    >> size of the animal) usually consisting of a double SIRLOIN. A baron of
    >> beef is generally roasted only for traditional or ceremonial
    >> occasions. In France, a baron refers to the saddle and two legs of
    >> lamb or mutton.
    >>
    >> Copyright Barron's Educational Services

    >
    > In Pittsburgh, PA back in the 60-70's we had a restaurant called Johnny
    > Garneau's that had a baron of beef on the smorgasbord every night. (For
    > those paying attention, yes - that's an English cut of beef on a
    > Sweedish buffet in a French-sounding restaurant)
    >
    > The chef at the carving station used what appeared to be at least 20"
    > granton slicer and cut to order rare, medium, or well done any thickness
    > and quantity you wanted. I'd bet they went through at least two of
    > these on weekend nights. They also had a whole ham at the carving
    > station, and plenty of other hot entrees.
    >
    > It was the best buffet I can remember. I must have eaten there at least
    > 25 times over the years. I would love to go back in time and visit that
    > restaurant again knowing about and appreciating food as much as I do
    > know. I was probably only 14 years old the last time I ate there ~1980
    > or so.
    >
    > Any other Pittsbuggers remember they place? There was at least 3 of
    > them "Johnny Garneau's Golden Spike": Monreoville, North Hills, 6th
    > Street Downtown.


    Well, I've lived in Pittsburgh most of my life. Unfortunately I don't
    remember Johnny Garneau's. And I was often in the Monroeville area as
    my aunt lived out that way and I lived with her for a number of years
    and then visited often. Anyway, one place I do remember is The Flame
    Steakhouse, at the corner of Fifth and Liberty downtown. I went there
    often. They grilled steaks "Pittsburgh rare". I loved that place.

    So, now you've got me all nostalgic for and craving the baron of beef
    from Johnny Garneau's even though I've never been there. Damn you! ;-)

    BTW, "Pittsbuggers"?

    Kate


    --
    Kate Connally
    If I were as old as I feel, Id be dead already.
    Goldfish: The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    Kate Connally wrote:

    > Well, I've lived in Pittsburgh most of my life. Unfortunately I don't
    > remember Johnny Garneau's. And I was often in the Monroeville area as
    > my aunt lived out that way and I lived with her for a number of years
    > and then visited often.


    I had only eaten at the JG in North Hills. It was in the corner of the
    parking lot of Northway Mall at McKnight and Peebles, across from what
    used to be the children's shelter and Kaufmann's back then but is now a
    Giant Eagle last time I visited.

    > BTW, "Pittsbuggers"?


    The Ebonic pronunciation. <ducking>

    -sw

  5. #5
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    In article <gtukcn$pts$[email protected]>,
    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Dimitri wrote:
    >
    > > In England, a large cut of beef (50 to 100 pounds, depending on the size
    > > of the animal) usually consisting of a double SIRLOIN. A baron of beef
    > > is generally roasted only for traditional or ceremonial occasions. In
    > > France, a baron refers to the saddle and two legs of lamb or mutton.
    > >
    > > Copyright Barron's Educational Services

    >
    > In Pittsburgh, PA back in the 60-70's we had a restaurant called Johnny
    > Garneau's that had a baron of beef on the smorgasbord every night.


    > The chef at the carving station used what appeared to be at least 20"
    > granton slicer and cut to order rare, medium, or well done any thickness
    > and quantity you wanted.


    When my wife went to college, she lived in the dorms the first three
    years. The third year she got into the fanciest dorm, and they had the
    best food. I ate there occasionally. It was all you could eat. A
    couple of times they had baron of beef. There was a carving station
    (maybe two) set out in the dining room. I still remember how huge those
    pieces of beef were.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  6. #6
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]


    "Dan Abel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <gtukcn$pts$[email protected]>,
    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Dimitri wrote:
    >>
    >> > In England, a large cut of beef (50 to 100 pounds, depending on the
    >> > size
    >> > of the animal) usually consisting of a double SIRLOIN. A baron of beef
    >> > is generally roasted only for traditional or ceremonial occasions. In
    >> > France, a baron refers to the saddle and two legs of lamb or mutton.
    >> >
    >> > Copyright Barron's Educational Services

    >>
    >> In Pittsburgh, PA back in the 60-70's we had a restaurant called Johnny
    >> Garneau's that had a baron of beef on the smorgasbord every night.

    >
    >> The chef at the carving station used what appeared to be at least 20"
    >> granton slicer and cut to order rare, medium, or well done any thickness
    >> and quantity you wanted.

    >
    > When my wife went to college, she lived in the dorms the first three
    > years. The third year she got into the fanciest dorm, and they had the
    > best food. I ate there occasionally. It was all you could eat. A
    > couple of times they had baron of beef. There was a carving station
    > (maybe two) set out in the dining room. I still remember how huge those
    > pieces of beef were.
    >
    >

    The baron of beef is huge and makes for a fomidable presentation but it
    doesn't consist of very choice cuts, it's the Sirloin; top sirloin, middle
    sirloin, bottom sirloin. And typically restaurants cheat, they withold the
    front part of the Sirloin (which is more tender) and move into the Round.
    At a buffet most folks generally don't come back for seconds of the "big
    beef" because even rare it can be dry/chewy and strongly flavored, but
    instead rather satisfy their appetite with other items.




  7. #7
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    brooklyn1 wrote:

    > The baron of beef is huge and makes for a fomidable presentation but it
    > doesn't consist of very choice cuts, it's the Sirloin; top sirloin, middle
    > sirloin, bottom sirloin. And typically restaurants cheat, they withold the
    > front part of the Sirloin (which is more tender) and move into the Round.
    > At a buffet most folks generally don't come back for seconds of the "big
    > beef" because even rare it can be dry/chewy and strongly flavored, but
    > instead rather satisfy their appetite with other items.


    More of the infamous Sheldon-style paranoia.

    Every baron of beef I've sampled has been excellent. If there was any
    part of the round in there, it would be very noticeable.

    -sw

  8. #8
    Mack A. Damia Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    On Thu, 07 May 2009 07:32:24 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Dimitri wrote:
    >
    >> In England, a large cut of beef (50 to 100 pounds, depending on the size
    >> of the animal) usually consisting of a double SIRLOIN. A baron of beef
    >> is generally roasted only for traditional or ceremonial occasions. In
    >> France, a baron refers to the saddle and two legs of lamb or mutton.
    >>
    >> Copyright Barron's Educational Services

    >
    >In Pittsburgh, PA back in the 60-70's we had a restaurant called Johnny
    >Garneau's that had a baron of beef on the smorgasbord every night. (For
    >those paying attention, yes - that's an English cut of beef on a Sweedish
    >buffet in a French-sounding restaurant)
    >
    >The chef at the carving station used what appeared to be at least 20"
    >granton slicer and cut to order rare, medium, or well done any thickness
    >and quantity you wanted. I'd bet they went through at least two of these
    >on weekend nights. They also had a whole ham at the carving station, and
    >plenty of other hot entrees.
    >
    >It was the best buffet I can remember. I must have eaten there at least
    >25 times over the years. I would love to go back in time and visit that
    >restaurant again knowing about and appreciating food as much as I do know.
    > I was probably only 14 years old the last time I ate there ~1980 or so.
    >
    >Any other Pittsbuggers remember they place? There was at least 3 of them
    >"Johnny Garneau's Golden Spike": Monreoville, North Hills, 6th Street
    >Downtown.
    >
    >(crossposted from AFB)
    >
    >-sw


    I was there in the 80s and early 90s. Don't recall that name.

    How about he Oyster House in Market Square. Are they still there?

    I used to love getting a fish sandwich and buttermilk along with fresh
    oysters on-the-half-shell.
    --
    mad

  9. #9
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    In article <gtvif0$9j9$[email protected]>,
    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    > > The baron of beef is huge and makes for a fomidable presentation but it
    > > doesn't consist of very choice cuts, it's the Sirloin;


    > More of the infamous Sheldon-style paranoia.
    >
    > Every baron of beef I've sampled has been excellent. If there was any
    > part of the round in there, it would be very noticeable.


    Does get a bit tiring, doesn't it? Sheldon advocates roasting chuck,
    says it's perfectly tender. But sirloin isn't?

    Gotta grind your hamburger yourself, otherwise you don't know what's in
    it. But he buys the very cheapest sausage, hot dogs and sausage in a
    can, but that's OK because "everybody does that".

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  10. #10
    BD Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]


    "Mack A. Damia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Thu, 07 May 2009 07:32:24 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Dimitri wrote:
    >>
    >>> In England, a large cut of beef (50 to 100 pounds, depending on the size
    >>> of the animal) usually consisting of a double SIRLOIN. A baron of beef
    >>> is generally roasted only for traditional or ceremonial occasions. In
    >>> France, a baron refers to the saddle and two legs of lamb or mutton.
    >>>
    >>> Copyright Barron's Educational Services

    >>
    >>In Pittsburgh, PA back in the 60-70's we had a restaurant called Johnny
    >>Garneau's that had a baron of beef on the smorgasbord every night. (For
    >>those paying attention, yes - that's an English cut of beef on a Sweedish
    >>buffet in a French-sounding restaurant)
    >>
    >>The chef at the carving station used what appeared to be at least 20"
    >>granton slicer and cut to order rare, medium, or well done any thickness
    >>and quantity you wanted. I'd bet they went through at least two of these
    >>on weekend nights. They also had a whole ham at the carving station, and
    >>plenty of other hot entrees.
    >>
    >>It was the best buffet I can remember. I must have eaten there at least
    >>25 times over the years. I would love to go back in time and visit that
    >>restaurant again knowing about and appreciating food as much as I do know.
    >> I was probably only 14 years old the last time I ate there ~1980 or so.
    >>
    >>Any other Pittsbuggers remember they place? There was at least 3 of them
    >>"Johnny Garneau's Golden Spike": Monreoville, North Hills, 6th Street
    >>Downtown.
    >>
    >>(crossposted from AFB)
    >>
    >>-sw

    >
    > I was there in the 80s and early 90s. Don't recall that name.
    >
    > How about he Oyster House in Market Square. Are they still there?
    >
    > I used to love getting a fish sandwich and buttermilk along with fresh
    > oysters on-the-half-shell.
    > --
    > mad


    Oyster House is still in the Square.

    I remember Johnny G's on Rt 51. There is a "pan -asian" place in that
    location now. In typical 'burgh speak, it's across the street from where
    the Elephant Bar used to be.

    Barb



  11. #11
    Bill Ghrist Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    BD wrote:
    > "Mack A. Damia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Thu, 07 May 2009 07:32:24 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:




    >>
    >> How about he Oyster House in Market Square. Are they still there?
    >>
    >> I used to love getting a fish sandwich and buttermilk along with fresh
    >> oysters on-the-half-shell.
    >> --
    >> mad

    >
    > Oyster House is still in the Square.
    >


    And still has one of the best fish sandwiches around (IMHO).

    > I remember Johnny G's on Rt 51. There is a "pan -asian" place in that
    > location now. In typical 'burgh speak, it's across the street from where
    > the Elephant Bar used to be.
    >
    > Barb
    >
    >

    Well of course we give directions with reference to places that aren't
    there anymore--everybody knows them better than the places that are
    there now.

  12. #12
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    Dan Abel wrote:
    > In article <gtvif0$9j9$[email protected]>,
    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> brooklyn1 wrote:
    >>
    >>> The baron of beef is huge and makes for a fomidable presentation but it
    >>> doesn't consist of very choice cuts, it's the Sirloin;

    >
    >> More of the infamous Sheldon-style paranoia.
    >>
    >> Every baron of beef I've sampled has been excellent. If there was any
    >> part of the round in there, it would be very noticeable.

    >
    > Does get a bit tiring, doesn't it? Sheldon advocates roasting chuck,
    > says it's perfectly tender. But sirloin isn't?


    Heh. Yeah - I missed that gem of irony. So which is it, Sheldon?
    >
    > Gotta grind your hamburger yourself, otherwise you don't know what's in
    > it. But he buys the very cheapest sausage, hot dogs and sausage in a
    > can, but that's OK because "everybody does that".


    Don't forget SPAM; He eats a can of that a week. SPAM takes first place
    in the "Mystery Meat" category. And that Hillshire Farms sausage - which
    he claims is as good as it gets .... ugh!

    -sw

  13. #13
    Arthur Evans Jr Guest

    Default Kleins (was: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA])

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mack A. Damia <[email protected]> wrote:

    > How about he Oyster House in Market Square. Are they still there?


    Well, while we are talking about long gone restaurants, how many here
    are old enough to remember Kleins, on 4th Avenue down town? In its time
    it was probably the best sea food restaurant in Pittsburgh, my parents
    used to tell me. Maybe in the 40s it was the only one.

    They had a circular mirror mounted on the ceiling, and when I was little
    I was fascinated by the people up there who were somehow eating upside
    down.

    The Heinz History Center has a neon sign from Kleins, or at least a sign
    that looks like the old one as best I remember.

    Art Evans

  14. #14
    Arthur Evans Jr Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    In article <gu077f$8h9$[email protected]>,
    Bill Ghrist <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Well of course we give directions with reference to places that aren't
    > there anymore--everybody knows them better than the places that are
    > there now.


    Tourist in Pittsburgh: How do I get to XXX?

    Local: Well, go down this road till you pass the Giant Eagle and then
    turn left.


    That's what the local says, but what the tourist hears is

    Local: Well, go down this road till you pass the giant eagle and then
    turn left.

    The poor tourist has no way to know know that Giant Eagle is a major
    grocery chain in the Pittsburgh area and goes happily down the road
    looking for a statue of a big bird...

    Art Evans
    long-time Pittsburgh resident

  15. #15
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    On May 8, 7:10*am, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compst> wrote:
    >
    >
    > Don't forget SPAM; *[Sheldon] eats a can of that a week. *SPAM takes first place
    > in the "Mystery Meat" category.


    Not quite. there is Chorizo bought from the Mexican butcher. Never
    again. I wondered why that stuff tasted so off and the stuff inside
    looked weird. No wonder it was so cheap. Goddamned lymph glands:

    "Mexican chorizo comes in two varieties fresh and dried, the fresh
    being much more common. Chorizo can be made from a variety of meat
    cuts, including lips, lymph nodes, and salivary glands"
    source-- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chorizo
    >
    > -sw


    --Bryan
    Visit Bobo Bonobo's Mortuary and Sausage Emporium
    On the web @ http://MySpace.com/BoboBonobo

  16. #16
    Mack A. Damia Guest

    Default Re: Kleins (was: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA])

    On Fri, 08 May 2009 09:01:48 -0400, Arthur Evans Jr
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Mack A. Damia <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> How about he Oyster House in Market Square. Are they still there?

    >
    >Well, while we are talking about long gone restaurants, how many here
    >are old enough to remember Kleins, on 4th Avenue down town? In its time
    >it was probably the best sea food restaurant in Pittsburgh, my parents
    >used to tell me. Maybe in the 40s it was the only one.
    >
    >They had a circular mirror mounted on the ceiling, and when I was little
    >I was fascinated by the people up there who were somehow eating upside
    >down.
    >
    >The Heinz History Center has a neon sign from Kleins, or at least a sign
    >that looks like the old one as best I remember.


    I was there on-and-of over a ten year period.

    There was a bar in Troy Hill that served great sandwiches, and quite a
    few decent eating places on the "gentrified" East Ohio Street, near
    where I stayed.

    I ate at the Oyster Bar frequently and we used to love to go to the
    Samurai Japanese Steak House - I think it was south of the city.

    Never did much food hunting on the Strip - much to my regret.

    I lived in an apartment with a view of the construction of the massive
    Interstates in the 1980s. What changes!
    --
    mad

  17. #17
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    On Thu, 07 May 2009 14:14:11 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

    > Kate Connally wrote:
    >
    >> Well, I've lived in Pittsburgh most of my life. Unfortunately I don't
    >> remember Johnny Garneau's. And I was often in the Monroeville area as
    >> my aunt lived out that way and I lived with her for a number of years
    >> and then visited often.

    >
    > I had only eaten at the JG in North Hills. It was in the corner of the
    > parking lot of Northway Mall at McKnight and Peebles, across from what
    > used to be the children's shelter and Kaufmann's back then but is now a
    > Giant Eagle last time I visited.
    >
    >> BTW, "Pittsbuggers"?

    >
    > The Ebonic pronunciation. <ducking>
    >
    > -sw


    better than 'pittsboogers.'

    your pal,
    blake


  18. #18
    George Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    Arthur Evans Jr wrote:
    > In article <gu077f$8h9$[email protected]>,
    > Bill Ghrist <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Well of course we give directions with reference to places that aren't
    >> there anymore--everybody knows them better than the places that are
    >> there now.

    >
    > Tourist in Pittsburgh: How do I get to XXX?
    >
    > Local: Well, go down this road till you pass the Giant Eagle and then
    > turn left.
    >
    >
    > That's what the local says, but what the tourist hears is
    >
    > Local: Well, go down this road till you pass the giant eagle and then
    > turn left.
    >
    > The poor tourist has no way to know know that Giant Eagle is a major
    > grocery chain in the Pittsburgh area and goes happily down the road
    > looking for a statue of a big bird...
    >
    > Art Evans
    > long-time Pittsburgh resident


    Heck, I can't even begin to remember how many times an out of towner
    pulled up to in a car and said...
    "Excuse me but can you tell me how to get to the DoKwezknee bridge?"
    To which I'd always say....
    " Sure, but, if you take the Docain bridge, you'll get there much
    faster...."

    BTW,

    DoKwezknee = Docain = Duquesene (which is the name of the bridge)


    AH, the sheer joy of being a 'burgher....

  19. #19
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    blake murphy wrote:
    > On Thu, 07 May 2009 14:14:11 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> Kate Connally wrote:
    >>
    >>> BTW, "Pittsbuggers"?

    >> The Ebonic pronunciation. <ducking>

    >
    > better than 'pittsboogers.'


    The way it sounds to me, the accent is placed on the TT's making it sound
    like a "K". (Picksboogers)

    I've taken Greyhound into Pittsburgh a few times and as soon as you exit
    the Fort Pitt Tunnel, a panoramic Pittsburgh is staring at you as if you
    just exited a cave into another world. There are always cheers from
    riders exclaiming, "PICKSBUGG!"

    ObPghFood: Now I have a craving for thinly sliced fried zucchini, sliced
    on the horizontal, La Cite and Klines - style.

    -sw

  20. #20
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Baron of Beef [in Pittsburgh PA]

    Arthur Evans Jr wrote:

    > The poor tourist has no way to know know that Giant Eagle is a major
    > grocery chain in the Pittsburgh area and goes happily down the road
    > looking for a statue of a big bird...


    In Austin we give directions relative to butts (H.E.Butts Grocery Store).

    -sw

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