Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 66

Thread: Rainbow swiss chard

  1. #1
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Rainbow swiss chard

    Not a green I've ever had, and not one I've even considered cooking
    before. But the beauty of it got me curious so I tried it tonight and
    it's definitely interesting. Sort of a spicy bite to it. I sauteed it
    with thin slices of garlic in butter and olive oil and when finished, I
    shredded a little Parmesan cheese over it. A little salt (not the sub
    I've been using) and some fresh ground black pepper.

    Not bad! I'd make it again. Nothing like spinach, which I adore.

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    On Sun, 22 Apr 2012 21:43:35 -0400, Cheryl <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Not a green I've ever had, and not one I've even considered cooking
    > before. But the beauty of it got me curious so I tried it tonight and
    > it's definitely interesting. Sort of a spicy bite to it. I sauteed it
    > with thin slices of garlic in butter and olive oil and when finished, I
    > shredded a little Parmesan cheese over it. A little salt (not the sub
    > I've been using) and some fresh ground black pepper.
    >
    > Not bad! I'd make it again. Nothing like spinach, which I adore.


    It's very good in bean dishes too.

    Have you ever cooked beet greens? They've been my favorite since I
    was a little kid.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  3. #3
    Ad Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:55:06 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 22 Apr 2012 21:43:35 -0400, Cheryl <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >> Not a green I've ever had, and not one I've even considered cooking
    >> before. But the beauty of it got me curious so I tried it tonight and
    >> it's definitely interesting. Sort of a spicy bite to it. I sauteed it
    >> with thin slices of garlic in butter and olive oil and when finished, I
    >> shredded a little Parmesan cheese over it. A little salt (not the sub
    >> I've been using) and some fresh ground black pepper.
    >>
    >> Not bad! I'd make it again. Nothing like spinach, which I adore.

    >
    >It's very good in bean dishes too.
    >
    >Have you ever cooked beet greens? They've been my favorite since I
    >was a little kid.


    Aren't chard and beet greens the same thing (beta vulgaris)?

    --
    VB

  4. #4
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]d
    says...
    >
    > On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:55:06 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On Sun, 22 Apr 2012 21:43:35 -0400, Cheryl <[email protected]>
    > >wrote:
    > >
    > >> Not a green I've ever had, and not one I've even considered cooking
    > >> before. But the beauty of it got me curious so I tried it tonight and
    > >> it's definitely interesting. Sort of a spicy bite to it. I sauteed it
    > >> with thin slices of garlic in butter and olive oil and when finished, I
    > >> shredded a little Parmesan cheese over it. A little salt (not the sub
    > >> I've been using) and some fresh ground black pepper.
    > >>
    > >> Not bad! I'd make it again. Nothing like spinach, which I adore.

    > >
    > >It's very good in bean dishes too.
    > >
    > >Have you ever cooked beet greens? They've been my favorite since I
    > >was a little kid.

    >
    > Aren't chard and beet greens the same thing (beta vulgaris)?


    Not quite. Beet greens are the leaves of beetroot, (beta vulgaris) grown
    mainly for the edible purple root.

    Chard is beta vulgaris var cicla, grown mainly for the stems and greens,
    they dont make that round purple root and people don't generally eat the
    root.

    Rainbow chard is brightly coloured, very ornamental edible in the veg
    garden.
    Janet

  5. #5
    Ad Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 11:04:10 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]d
    >says...
    >>
    >> On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:55:06 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> >On Sun, 22 Apr 2012 21:43:35 -0400, Cheryl <[email protected]>
    >> >wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Not a green I've ever had, and not one I've even considered cooking
    >> >> before. But the beauty of it got me curious so I tried it tonight and
    >> >> it's definitely interesting. Sort of a spicy bite to it. I sauteed it
    >> >> with thin slices of garlic in butter and olive oil and when finished, I
    >> >> shredded a little Parmesan cheese over it. A little salt (not the sub
    >> >> I've been using) and some fresh ground black pepper.
    >> >>
    >> >> Not bad! I'd make it again. Nothing like spinach, which I adore.
    >> >
    >> >It's very good in bean dishes too.
    >> >
    >> >Have you ever cooked beet greens? They've been my favorite since I
    >> >was a little kid.

    >>
    >> Aren't chard and beet greens the same thing (beta vulgaris)?

    >
    > Not quite. Beet greens are the leaves of beetroot, (beta vulgaris) grown
    >mainly for the edible purple root.
    >
    > Chard is beta vulgaris var cicla, grown mainly for the stems and greens,
    >they dont make that round purple root and people don't generally eat the
    >root.
    >
    >Rainbow chard is brightly coloured, very ornamental edible in the veg
    >garden.


    It's still the same plant, directed/selected into a different
    direction: roots (with greens as a side product), or green or
    multi-colored leaves (var cicla).

    --
    Ad


  6. #6
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    On Sun, 22 Apr 2012 21:43:35 -0400, Cheryl <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Not a green I've ever had, and not one I've even considered cooking
    >before. But the beauty of it got me curious so I tried it tonight and
    >it's definitely interesting. Sort of a spicy bite to it. I sauteed it
    >with thin slices of garlic in butter and olive oil and when finished, I
    >shredded a little Parmesan cheese over it. A little salt (not the sub
    >I've been using) and some fresh ground black pepper.
    >
    >Not bad! I'd make it again. Nothing like spinach, which I adore.


    Chard is beets.

  7. #7
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    On Apr 22, 6:43*pm, Cheryl <jlhsha...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > Not a green I've ever had, and not one I've even considered cooking
    > before. *But the beauty of it got me curious so I tried it tonight and
    > it's definitely interesting. *Sort of a spicy bite to it. *I sauteed it
    > with thin slices of garlic in butter and olive oil and when finished, I
    > shredded a little Parmesan cheese over it. A little salt (not the sub
    > I've been using) and some fresh ground black pepper.
    >
    > Not bad! *I'd make it again. *Nothing like spinach, which I adore.


    I like chard. Please try just sauteeing it in a bit of butter and
    olive oil with just salt and pepper. No other flavorings. That is
    when you will get the true flavor of this green. I find it very
    tasty. I think the garlic and parmesan masked it's true flavor for
    you.

    Usually when I try a new vegetable for me, I like to try it 'naked',
    so that I can get a true representation of the vegetable and then
    decide if I want to do other things with it. Chard is one of those
    things that don't need much else, IMHO.




  8. #8
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    On Apr 23, 3:34*am, Ad <a...@ad.invalid> wrote:
    > On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 11:04:10 +0100, Janet <H...@invalid.net> wrote:
    > >In article <pp5ap7pvban9t93l3e5rm4jv6ojqqkr...@4ax.com>, a...@ad.invalid
    > >says...

    >
    > >> On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:55:06 -0700, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:

    >
    > >> >On Sun, 22 Apr 2012 21:43:35 -0400, Cheryl <jlhsha...@hotmail.com>
    > >> >wrote:

    >
    > >> >> Not a green I've ever had, and not one I've even considered cooking
    > >> >> before. *But the beauty of it got me curious so I tried it tonight and
    > >> >> it's definitely interesting. *Sort of a spicy bite to it. *I sauteed it
    > >> >> with thin slices of garlic in butter and olive oil and when finished, I
    > >> >> shredded a little Parmesan cheese over it. A little salt (not the sub
    > >> >> I've been using) and some fresh ground black pepper.

    >
    > >> >> Not bad! *I'd make it again. *Nothing like spinach, which I adore.

    >
    > >> >It's very good in bean dishes too.

    >
    > >> >Have you ever cooked beet greens? *They've been my favorite since I
    > >> >was a little kid.

    >
    > >> Aren't chard and beet greens the same thing (beta vulgaris)?

    >
    > > *Not quite. Beet greens are the leaves of beetroot, (beta vulgaris) grown
    > >mainly for the edible purple root.

    >
    > > *Chard is beta vulgaris var cicla, grown mainly for the stems and greens,
    > >they dont make that round purple root and people don't generally eat the
    > >root.

    >
    > >Rainbow chard is brightly coloured, very ornamental edible in the veg
    > >garden.

    >
    > It's still the same plant, directed/selected into a different
    > direction: roots (with greens as a side product), or green or
    > multi-colored leaves (var cicla).
    >
    > --
    > Ad


    Yes it is in the same family. But the taste is quite different.


  9. #9
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 07:23:55 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Apr 23, 3:34*am, Ad <a...@ad.invalid> wrote:
    >> On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 11:04:10 +0100, Janet <H...@invalid.net> wrote:
    >> >In article <pp5ap7pvban9t93l3e5rm4jv6ojqqkr...@4ax.com>, a...@ad.invalid
    >> >says...

    >>
    >> >> On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:55:06 -0700, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:

    >>
    >> >> >On Sun, 22 Apr 2012 21:43:35 -0400, Cheryl <jlhsha...@hotmail.com>
    >> >> >wrote:

    >>
    >> >> >> Not a green I've ever had, and not one I've even considered cooking
    >> >> >> before. *But the beauty of it got me curious so I tried it tonight and
    >> >> >> it's definitely interesting. *Sort of a spicy bite to it. *I sauteed it
    >> >> >> with thin slices of garlic in butter and olive oil and when finished, I
    >> >> >> shredded a little Parmesan cheese over it. A little salt (not the sub
    >> >> >> I've been using) and some fresh ground black pepper.

    >>
    >> >> >> Not bad! *I'd make it again. *Nothing like spinach, which I adore.

    >>
    >> >> >It's very good in bean dishes too.

    >>
    >> >> >Have you ever cooked beet greens? *They've been my favorite since I
    >> >> >was a little kid.

    >>
    >> >> Aren't chard and beet greens the same thing (beta vulgaris)?

    >>
    >> > *Not quite. Beet greens are the leaves of beetroot, (beta vulgaris) grown
    >> >mainly for the edible purple root.

    >>
    >> > *Chard is beta vulgaris var cicla, grown mainly for the stems and greens,
    >> >they dont make that round purple root and people don't generally eat the
    >> >root.

    >>
    >> >Rainbow chard is brightly coloured, very ornamental edible in the veg
    >> >garden.

    >>
    >> It's still the same plant, directed/selected into a different
    >> direction: roots (with greens as a side product), or green or
    >> multi-colored leaves (var cicla).

    >
    >Yes it is in the same family. But the taste is quite different.


    Actually beet tops and chard taste the same... you'd not be able to
    tell the difference taste wise or visually... and there are many
    varieties of each but mostly the only differences are in coloration.

  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 18:50:49 +1000, Ad <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 00:55:06 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On Sun, 22 Apr 2012 21:43:35 -0400, Cheryl <[email protected]>
    > >wrote:
    > >
    > >> Not a green I've ever had, and not one I've even considered cooking
    > >> before. But the beauty of it got me curious so I tried it tonight and
    > >> it's definitely interesting. Sort of a spicy bite to it. I sauteed it
    > >> with thin slices of garlic in butter and olive oil and when finished, I
    > >> shredded a little Parmesan cheese over it. A little salt (not the sub
    > >> I've been using) and some fresh ground black pepper.
    > >>
    > >> Not bad! I'd make it again. Nothing like spinach, which I adore.

    > >
    > >It's very good in bean dishes too.
    > >
    > >Have you ever cooked beet greens? They've been my favorite since I
    > >was a little kid.

    >
    > Aren't chard and beet greens the same thing (beta vulgaris)?


    No, they're cousins - from the same family but not the same.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 07:23:13 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Apr 22, 6:43*pm, Cheryl <jlhsha...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > > Not a green I've ever had, and not one I've even considered cooking
    > > before. *But the beauty of it got me curious so I tried it tonight and
    > > it's definitely interesting. *Sort of a spicy bite to it. *I sauteed it
    > > with thin slices of garlic in butter and olive oil and when finished, I
    > > shredded a little Parmesan cheese over it. A little salt (not the sub
    > > I've been using) and some fresh ground black pepper.
    > >
    > > Not bad! *I'd make it again. *Nothing like spinach, which I adore.

    >
    > I like chard. Please try just sauteeing it in a bit of butter and
    > olive oil with just salt and pepper. No other flavorings. That is
    > when you will get the true flavor of this green. I find it very
    > tasty. I think the garlic and parmesan masked it's true flavor for
    > you.
    >
    > Usually when I try a new vegetable for me, I like to try it 'naked',
    > so that I can get a true representation of the vegetable and then
    > decide if I want to do other things with it. Chard is one of those
    > things that don't need much else, IMHO.
    >
    >

    My grandfather tried that with me - his reasoning was "you love beet
    greens, so you'll probably like chard too". He grew red chard and he
    was convinced I'd love it. NOPE. Huge flavor difference and I hated
    it. After Gramps died, I didn't try chard again until just a few
    years ago. My taste buds have gotten dull in their old age, so I
    don't dislike it the way I used to but I'd never ever equate it with
    beet greens, nor would I mistake spinach for beet greens or chard.
    They might be genetically related, but their flavors are far far
    different to me.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  12. #12
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    Ad <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 11:04:10 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> [email protected]d says...


    >>> Aren't chard and beet greens the same thing (beta vulgaris)?

    >>
    >> Not quite. Beet greens are the leaves of beetroot, (beta vulgaris)
    >> grown mainly for the edible purple root.
    >>
    >> Chard is beta vulgaris var cicla, grown mainly for the stems and
    >> greens, they dont make that round purple root and people don't
    >> generally eat the root.
    >>
    >> Rainbow chard is brightly coloured, very ornamental edible in the veg
    >> garden.

    >
    > It's still the same plant, directed/selected into a different
    > direction: roots (with greens as a side product), or green or
    > multi-colored leaves (var cicla).


    So you're saying they all start from the exact same seed and somewhere along
    the line there is a process applied, depending on the result desired, which
    changes the way the plant grows? This is incorrect.

    It is not the same plant. If it was, then chard would not have a different
    binomial (scientific) name than beetroot or sugar beet. Cultivated beetroot,
    or red beet is beta vulgaris (technically, beta vulgaris subspecies
    vulgaris). Cultivated chard is beta vulgaris var cicla, a different plant.

    However rainbow chard is not a distinct species. There are several cultivars
    within "var cicla" of different colors, and rainbow chard is simply a mix.

    When you see "var" in the formal name of a plant, it is a cultivated variety
    or subspecies of the plant directly above it in the hierarchy. They are
    closely related, yes, but are not the same plant.

    Wiki articles on beets are well cited if you want to dig deeper:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beet
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chard
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beetroot

    MartyB



  13. #13
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    > On Sun, 22 Apr 2012 21:43:35 -0400, Cheryl <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Not a green I've ever had, and not one I've even considered cooking
    >> before. But the beauty of it got me curious so I tried it tonight
    >> and it's definitely interesting. Sort of a spicy bite to it. I
    >> sauteed it with thin slices of garlic in butter and olive oil and
    >> when finished, I shredded a little Parmesan cheese over it. A little
    >> salt (not the sub I've been using) and some fresh ground black
    >> pepper.
    >>
    >> Not bad! I'd make it again. Nothing like spinach, which I adore.

    >
    > Chard is beets.


    So is beetroot, and sugar beet. Culinarily speaking, it's a correct but
    useless fact, like something you would find in the help for Microsoft
    software. Jalapenos are peppers. So are habaneros and sweet bells. Bite into
    all three of them and tell me they are the same thing. Or let's see you grow
    a habanero pepper on a jalapeno plant, or a big fat sweet red taproot from
    chard seeds. Ain't happenin'.

    MartyB



  14. #14
    Roy Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    On Sunday, April 22, 2012 7:43:35 PM UTC-6, Cheryl wrote:
    > Not a green I've ever had, and not one I've even considered cooking
    > before. But the beauty of it got me curious so I tried it tonight and
    > it's definitely interesting. Sort of a spicy bite to it. I sauteed it
    > with thin slices of garlic in butter and olive oil and when finished, I
    > shredded a little Parmesan cheese over it. A little salt (not the sub
    > I've been using) and some fresh ground black pepper.
    >
    > Not bad! I'd make it again. Nothing like spinach, which I adore.


    I have grown Swiss Chard for fifty years. I love it and the deer love it too.

    I boil it for 15 minutes or so, drain off the water. While still hot
    butter with real butter (no crappy margarine), season with salt and
    pepper and sprinkle with white vinegar to taste.

    It matters not whether you have rainbow, red or green chard it is
    the same plant...just a different variety.

    ==


  15. #15
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 07:23:13 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Apr 22, 6:43*pm, Cheryl <jlhsha...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >> Not a green I've ever had, and not one I've even considered cooking
    >> before. *But the beauty of it got me curious so I tried it tonight and
    >> it's definitely interesting. *Sort of a spicy bite to it. *I sauteed it
    >> with thin slices of garlic in butter and olive oil and when finished, I
    >> shredded a little Parmesan cheese over it. A little salt (not the sub
    >> I've been using) and some fresh ground black pepper.
    >>
    >> Not bad! *I'd make it again. *Nothing like spinach, which I adore.

    >
    >I like chard. Please try just sauteeing it in a bit of butter and
    >olive oil with just salt and pepper. No other flavorings. That is
    >when you will get the true flavor of this green. I find it very
    >tasty. I think the garlic and parmesan masked it's true flavor for
    >you.
    >
    >Usually when I try a new vegetable for me, I like to try it 'naked',
    >so that I can get a true representation of the vegetable and then
    >decide if I want to do other things with it. Chard is one of those
    >things that don't need much else, IMHO.
    >
    >

    Don't throw away the stems, please. Begin cooking them before the
    leaves so that all is done at the same time. Serve with a bacon and
    onion warm dressing.
    Janet US

  16. #16
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > Ad <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> [email protected]d says...

    >
    >>>> Aren't chard and beet greens the same thing (beta vulgaris)?

    >
    >>> Chard is beta vulgaris var cicla, grown mainly for the stems and
    >>> greens, they dont make that round purple root and people don't
    >>> generally eat the root.

    >
    >> It's still the same plant, directed/selected into a different
    >> direction: roots (with greens as a side product), or green or
    >> multi-colored leaves (var cicla).

    >
    > So you're saying they all start from the exact same seed and somewhere along
    > the line there is a process applied, depending on the result desired, which
    > changes the way the plant grows? This is incorrect.


    There is a difference between selected and directed.

    > It is not the same plant. If it was, then chard would not have a different
    > binomial (scientific) name than beetroot or sugar beet. Cultivated beetroot,
    > or red beet is beta vulgaris (technically, beta vulgaris subspecies
    > vulgaris). Cultivated chard is beta vulgaris var cicla, a different plant.
    >
    > However rainbow chard is not a distinct species. There are several cultivars
    > within "var cicla" of different colors, and rainbow chard is simply a mix.
    >
    > When you see "var" in the formal name of a plant, it is a cultivated variety
    > or subspecies of the plant directly above it in the hierarchy. They are
    > closely related, yes, but are not the same plant.


    Like the many varieties of cabbage. Cauliflower, kohlrabi, brussel
    sprout, kale and so on. Their is a huge variety but they are all
    interfertile when cross polinatied.

  17. #17
    Ad Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 18:58:59 +0000 (UTC), Doug Freyburger
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >> Ad <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>> [email protected]d says...

    >>
    >>>>> Aren't chard and beet greens the same thing (beta vulgaris)?

    >>
    >>>> Chard is beta vulgaris var cicla, grown mainly for the stems and
    >>>> greens, they dont make that round purple root and people don't
    >>>> generally eat the root.


    >>> It's still the same plant, directed/selected into a different
    >>> direction: roots (with greens as a side product), or green or
    >>> multi-colored leaves (var cicla).

    >>
    >> So you're saying they all start from the exact same seed and somewhere along
    >> the line there is a process applied, depending on the result desired, which
    >> changes the way the plant grows? This is incorrect.

    >
    >There is a difference between selected and directed.


    I guess 'selected' in this case.

    --
    Ad

  18. #18
    Ad Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 11:17:15 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Ad <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 11:04:10 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <[email protected]>,
    >>> [email protected]d says...

    >
    >>>> Aren't chard and beet greens the same thing (beta vulgaris)?
    >>>
    >>> Not quite. Beet greens are the leaves of beetroot, (beta vulgaris)
    >>> grown mainly for the edible purple root.
    >>>
    >>> Chard is beta vulgaris var cicla, grown mainly for the stems and
    >>> greens, they dont make that round purple root and people don't
    >>> generally eat the root.
    >>>
    >>> Rainbow chard is brightly coloured, very ornamental edible in the veg
    >>> garden.

    >>
    >> It's still the same plant, directed/selected into a different
    >> direction: roots (with greens as a side product), or green or
    >> multi-colored leaves (var cicla).

    >
    >So you're saying they all start from the exact same seed and somewhere along
    >the line there is a process applied, depending on the result desired, which
    >changes the way the plant grows? This is incorrect.


    Not within one plant/generation.

    --
    Ad

  19. #19
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    Ad <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 18:58:59 +0000 (UTC), Doug Freyburger
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >>> Ad <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>> Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>> [email protected]d says...
    >>>
    >>>>>> Aren't chard and beet greens the same thing (beta vulgaris)?
    >>>
    >>>>> Chard is beta vulgaris var cicla, grown mainly for the stems and
    >>>>> greens, they dont make that round purple root and people don't
    >>>>> generally eat the root.

    >
    >>>> It's still the same plant, directed/selected into a different
    >>>> direction: roots (with greens as a side product), or green or
    >>>> multi-colored leaves (var cicla).
    >>>
    >>> So you're saying they all start from the exact same seed and
    >>> somewhere along the line there is a process applied, depending on
    >>> the result desired, which changes the way the plant grows? This is
    >>> incorrect.

    >>
    >> There is a difference between selected and directed.

    >
    > I guess 'selected' in this case.


    Neither, and that's not a guess. They are not the same plant. I won't
    re-explain for the fourth or fifth time.



  20. #20
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Rainbow swiss chard

    Ad <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 11:17:15 -0500, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Ad <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> On Mon, 23 Apr 2012 11:04:10 +0100, Janet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>> [email protected]d says...

    >>
    >>>>> Aren't chard and beet greens the same thing (beta vulgaris)?
    >>>>
    >>>> Not quite. Beet greens are the leaves of beetroot, (beta vulgaris)
    >>>> grown mainly for the edible purple root.
    >>>>
    >>>> Chard is beta vulgaris var cicla, grown mainly for the stems and
    >>>> greens, they dont make that round purple root and people don't
    >>>> generally eat the root.
    >>>>
    >>>> Rainbow chard is brightly coloured, very ornamental edible in the
    >>>> veg garden.
    >>>
    >>> It's still the same plant, directed/selected into a different
    >>> direction: roots (with greens as a side product), or green or
    >>> multi-colored leaves (var cicla).

    >>
    >> So you're saying they all start from the exact same seed and
    >> somewhere along the line there is a process applied, depending on
    >> the result desired, which changes the way the plant grows? This is
    >> incorrect.

    >
    > Not within one plant/generation.


    I see you are determined to believe what you want to believe. I guess that
    simplifies life inasmuch as you aren't burdened by pesky facts.



Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32