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Thread: A quick meal when the wife is gone

  1. #1
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default A quick meal when the wife is gone

    My wife is at Disneyland with the GKs. They're driving home tomorrow.
    I'm knocking back a few and want something easy to pop in the oven when
    I knock back my last.
    So I thought enchiladas. DW doesn't like them that much. I found some
    five month old pulled pork in the freezer and combined it with a small
    can of green chiles, a small can of tomato sauce, a little red onion,
    salt, cumin and chili powder. Then I added quite a bit of water and let
    it all reduce to proper thickness. Tasted good. I softened eight corn
    tortillas and dredged them in red enchilada sauce (canned). Then I
    stuffed the tortillas with the pulled pork mixture, laid them in a
    casserole to just fit, poured more enchilada sauce on top, covered with
    shredded cheese and the rest of the chopped red onion. I would have
    preferred green onions. The dish is in the fridge waiting for me to take
    a half hour to heat it.
    I'll serve it to myself with macaroni salad since I have a boatload of
    that stuff made and because I'm so into fusion. Hic!

    leo

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: A quick meal when the wife is gone

    On Fri, 06 Aug 2010 19:53:25 -0700, Leonard Blaisdell
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I found some five month old pulled pork in the freezer


    How did you know, did you label the package? I found something in the
    freezer today that I thought was a split ham hock and planned dinner
    around it. Much to my surprise, it turned out to be a thick piece of
    beef steak (which had a good smell of smoke). So much for that dinner
    plan. Thankfully the meat turned out to be rare, so hubby heated it
    up in a cast iron pan for his dinner. He thinks it was a tri-tip that
    we must have taken home from a party (because we don't cook tri-tip).

    I have a huge potato in the oven now....

    --

    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  3. #3
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: A quick meal when the wife is gone

    In article <o2kp56170hcpc[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Fri, 06 Aug 2010 19:53:25 -0700, Leonard Blaisdell
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I found some five month old pulled pork in the freezer

    >
    > How did you know, did you label the package?


    Yes. I'm careful about labeling and dating anything that goes in the
    freezer. Oddly, I'm comfortable eating very old food in the freezer if
    it looks OK.
    I don't label stuff that will stink up the garbage can if put in too
    early. If it ain't got no writin', chuck it on Thursday.

    leo

  4. #4
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Leftover barbecued tri-tip

    sf wrote:

    > I found something in the freezer today that I thought was a split ham hock
    > and planned dinner around it. Much to my surprise, it turned out to be a
    > thick piece of beef steak (which had a good smell of smoke). So much for
    > that dinner plan. Thankfully the meat turned out to be rare, so hubby
    > heated it up in a cast iron pan for his dinner. He thinks it was a
    > tri-tip that we must have taken home from a party (because we don't cook
    > tri-tip).
    >
    > I have a huge potato in the oven now....


    Sounds good for where YOU live, because it isn't all that hot outside!

    When the temperature soars and we have leftover barbecued tri-tip, I like to
    put it into a main-dish cabbage salad. The flavors can be varied however,
    you like. I like it with coconut vinegar, fish sauce, a touch of sugar,
    cilantro, garlic, and sliced medium-hot chiles. Another good combination is
    lime juice, cilantro, cumin, ground coriander, tangerine zest, and adobo
    seasoning.

    Bob




  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Leftover barbecued tri-tip

    On Fri, 6 Aug 2010 23:06:07 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > When the temperature soars and we have leftover barbecued tri-tip, I like to
    > put it into a main-dish cabbage salad. The flavors can be varied however,
    > you like. I like it with coconut vinegar, fish sauce, a touch of sugar,
    > cilantro, garlic, and sliced medium-hot chiles. Another good combination is
    > lime juice, cilantro, cumin, ground coriander, tangerine zest, and adobo
    > seasoning.


    I've been intrigued by harissa ever since I heard about it, but
    haven't tried it yet. The guy who lost to Melissa d'Arabian slathered
    it on a steak, but I plan to try it on a barbecued boneless leg of
    lamb someday. One of my finds at Rainbow grocery was harissa... not
    the paste, a powder. I'm stoked.

    --

    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  6. #6
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Leftover barbecued tri-tip

    sf wrote:

    > I've been intrigued by harissa ever since I heard about it, but
    > haven't tried it yet. The guy who lost to Melissa d'Arabian slathered
    > it on a steak, but I plan to try it on a barbecued boneless leg of
    > lamb someday. One of my finds at Rainbow grocery was harissa... not
    > the paste, a powder. I'm stoked.


    Harissa is pretty easy to make, and doesn't contain any hard-to-find spices.
    Unfortunately for me, one of the essential flavors of harissa is caraway,
    which I can't stand.

    Bob




  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Leftover barbecued tri-tip

    On Sat, 7 Aug 2010 12:40:08 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > sf wrote:
    >
    > > I've been intrigued by harissa ever since I heard about it, but
    > > haven't tried it yet. The guy who lost to Melissa d'Arabian slathered
    > > it on a steak, but I plan to try it on a barbecued boneless leg of
    > > lamb someday. One of my finds at Rainbow grocery was harissa... not
    > > the paste, a powder. I'm stoked.

    >
    > Harissa is pretty easy to make, and doesn't contain any hard-to-find spices.
    > Unfortunately for me, one of the essential flavors of harissa is caraway,
    > which I can't stand.
    >

    I like caraway, but for me it was more of a taste trial. I've never
    had it before and I didn't want to make a big commitment before I knew
    if I liked it or not.

    --

    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  8. #8
    Gorio Guest

    Default Re: A quick meal when the wife is gone


    'Bob Terwilliger[_1_ Wrote:
    > ;1515744']sf wrote:
    > -
    > I've been intrigued by harissa ever since I heard about it, but
    > haven't tried it yet. The guy who lost to Melissa d'Arabian slathered
    > it on a steak, but I plan to try it on a barbecued boneless leg of
    > lamb someday. One of my finds at Rainbow grocery was harissa... not
    > the paste, a powder. I'm stoked.-
    >
    > Harissa is pretty easy to make, and doesn't contain any hard-to-find
    > spices.
    > Unfortunately for me, one of the essential flavors of harissa is
    > caraway,
    > which I can't stand.
    >
    > Bob


    Amen to that, Bob. It's one of the very few ingredients that triggers
    the gag reflex. I love the rueben sandwhich; but, if the pab/restaurant
    doesn't have caraway-free rye, I have to pass.

    My favorite Polish restaurant (Polonez) puts them into the kraut. YUCK!!
    Great czarnina, though. The real deal, with Muscovy duck blood. Never
    use pig blood for czarnina; anyone can tell the difference.

    Hope you enjoy(ed) the free time, SF. It's precious stuff. What sort of
    beer/drink you knockin' back?




    --
    Gorio

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