Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: question on "molded" pasta dish

  1. #1
    J Guest

    Default question on "molded" pasta dish

    I'm sure someone here will know exactly what I mean.

    I saw this dish in a cookbook in Borders one day, but when I went back
    to decide if I really wanted the book, they'd changed the display and
    so I couldn't find it. As best I can remember, cooked pasta was molded
    in a large casserole dish, then the opening was filled (with ground
    meat?). The whole thing was baked, then turned out to be sliced and
    served.

    Could someone tell me what it's called, and guide me to a recipe?

  2. #2
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: question on "molded" pasta dish

    J wrote:

    > I saw this dish in a cookbook in Borders one day, but when I went back
    > to decide if I really wanted the book, they'd changed the display and
    > so I couldn't find it. As best I can remember, cooked pasta was molded
    > in a large casserole dish, then the opening was filled (with ground
    > meat?). The whole thing was baked, then turned out to be sliced and
    > served.
    >
    > Could someone tell me what it's called, and guide me to a recipe?


    Timpano in general is a kettle-drum-shaped baked pasta dish which gets put
    into a casserole (or springform pan) and unmolded as you describe. I think
    the one you want is Timpano di Maccheroni; google for recipes (and
    pictures).

    Bob


  3. #3
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: question on "molded" pasta dish

    J wrote:
    > I'm sure someone here will know exactly what I mean.
    >
    > I saw this dish in a cookbook in Borders one day, but when I went back
    > to decide if I really wanted the book, they'd changed the display and
    > so I couldn't find it. As best I can remember, cooked pasta was molded
    > in a large casserole dish, then the opening was filled (with ground
    > meat?). The whole thing was baked, then turned out to be sliced and
    > served.
    >
    > Could someone tell me what it's called, and guide me to a recipe?



    If it's molded, throw it out. (sorry, I had to say that)

    Sounds like "Spaghetti Pie", except that's usually served from the pan.

    Bob

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: question on "molded" pasta dish

    On Thu, 20 May 2010 18:34:43 -0700 (PDT), J wrote:

    > I'm sure someone here will know exactly what I mean.
    >
    > I saw this dish in a cookbook in Borders one day, but when I went back
    > to decide if I really wanted the book, they'd changed the display and
    > so I couldn't find it. As best I can remember, cooked pasta was molded
    > in a large casserole dish, then the opening was filled (with ground
    > meat?). The whole thing was baked, then turned out to be sliced and
    > served.
    >
    > Could someone tell me what it's called, and guide me to a recipe?


    Sounds like something from the 60's. It probably went out of print.

    I've seen Greek pastitsio prepared this way. But I think it's an
    inefficient way to prepare/serve that combination. Just mix it all
    together for even distribution.

    -sw

  5. #5
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: question on "molded" pasta dish

    J wrote:

    > I'm sure someone here will know exactly what I mean.
    >
    > I saw this dish in a cookbook in Borders one day, but when I went back
    > to decide if I really wanted the book, they'd changed the display and
    > so I couldn't find it. As best I can remember, cooked pasta was molded
    > in a large casserole dish, then the opening was filled (with ground
    > meat?). The whole thing was baked, then turned out to be sliced and
    > served.
    >
    > Could someone tell me what it's called, and guide me to a recipe?


    It's a timballo.
    http://www.google.it/images?hl=it&q=...ed=0CDYQsAQwAw

    Like many other oven baked pasta dishes, it's based on cooked pasta and a
    sauce, be it a meaty bolognese or a southern italian style tomatoey sauce or
    any other sauce: tomato + peas, tomato + meat + peas, cheese sauce, cheese
    and veggies sauce... Sometimes you find also bechamel sauce along with the
    meatier sauces, to keep the timballo firmer.
    It's all mixed, poured in a mold and oven-baked and then, just as you say,
    turned upside down to be sliced and served.
    One doesn't need a recipe, just pasta and sauce, or sauces if you want more
    than one. Chooese your favorite pasta format, your favorite sauce/s and go.
    --
    Vilco
    No, non mi sono mai allenato, puzzavo di mio




  6. #6
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: question on "molded" pasta dish

    ViLco wrote:

    >> Could someone tell me what it's called, and guide me to a recipe?

    >
    > It's a timballo.
    > http://www.google.it/images?hl=it&q=...ed=0CDYQsAQwAw


    BTW: as some of those pioctures show, you can line the baking dish with
    slices of veggies like eggplant, for a more attractive result.
    --
    Vilco
    No, non mi sono mai allenato, puzzavo di mio




  7. #7
    J Guest

    Default Re: question on "molded" pasta dish

    On May 20, 10:37*pm, zxcvbob <zxcv...@charter.net> wrote:
    >
    > If it's molded, throw it out. (sorry, I had to say that)



    LOL

    "Timballo" seems to be what I was looking for--thanks a lot !!

  8. #8
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: question on "molded" pasta dish


    "ViLco" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio >J wrote:

    cooked pasta was molded
    >> in a large casserole dish, then the opening was filled (with ground>>
    >> meat?). The whole thing was baked, then turned out to be sliced and>>
    >> served.

    > It's a timballo.
    > http://www.google.it/images?hl=it&q=...ed=0CDYQsAQwAw
    >
    > Like many other oven baked pasta dishes, it's based on cooked pasta and a
    > > sauce, be it a meaty bolognese or a southern italian style tomatoey

    > sauce or any other sauce: tomato + peas, tomato + meat + peas, cheese
    > sauce, cheese > and veggies sauce... Sometimes you find also bechamel
    > sauce along with the meatier sauces, to keep the timballo firmer.
    > It's all mixed, poured in a mold and oven-baked and then, just as you say,
    > > turned upside down to be sliced and served.> One doesn't need a recipe,

    > just pasta and sauce, or sauces if you want more than one. Chooese your
    > favorite pasta format, your favorite sauce/s and go.


    And it is my least favorite primo with all its faults of being too heavy,
    predictable, lacking real distinction. It's a looker, it is, and make
    people goggle when it is carried to the table.

    That said, I'm making a slightly less turgid version Sunday. I will blind
    bake a big shell using pastry draped over a shape. I will unmold it and
    fill it with tortelli/ravioli made from wild foods of the season, half
    sauced alla panna con tartufo and half with a salsa verde made of what's up
    among my herbs at the moment. That's pretty much parsley, rosemary, chives
    and tarragon. This has been a dark and cold spring..



  9. #9
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: question on "molded" pasta dish

    Giusi wrote:

    >> It's a timballo.


    > And it is my least favorite primo with all its faults of being too
    > heavy, predictable, lacking real distinction. It's a looker, it is,
    > and make people goggle when it is carried to the table.


    Exactly, and every pasta al forno is way better than that, being made at
    it's right moistness and not with the toughness that a timballo must have in
    order to be sliced.

    > This has been a dark and cold spring..


    A horrible spring! My GF's wine usually gets bottled at february and is
    fully developed (11.5% alcohol and bubbly) by the second week of April: this
    year it took a month more to complete the re-fermentation in bottle, it got
    ready about a week ago. It's lambrusco made with the traditional method:
    first fermentation in the vats brings it up to circa 8-9% alcohol, then it's
    bottled in late winter and endures the second fermentation in the bottles,
    thus getting another 2-3 % alcohol and the bubbles. It's a goddamn hars
    lambrusco, perfect with fatty foods like cotechino, zampone, cotiche (yum).

    Way too cold and rain, I've had enough for the whole year: I have a grill
    cookout outdoor with colleagues on saturday 29th and the weather forecasts
    all say 30-40% probability of rain, starting the night before. A really
    screwed-up spring...
    --
    Vilco
    No, non mi sono mai allenato, puzzavo di mio




  10. #10
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: question on "molded" pasta dish


    "ViLco" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    It's lambrusco made with the traditional method:
    > first fermentation in the vats brings it up to circa 8-9% alcohol, then
    > it's > bottled in late winter and endures the second fermentation in the
    > bottles, thus getting another 2-3 % alcohol and the bubbles. It's a
    > goddamn hars > lambrusco, perfect with fatty foods like cotechino,
    > zampone, cotiche (yum).


    Sono convinta!

    Good luck on the 29th. They've been wrong right along, so maybe they are
    this time too. We'll hope.



  11. #11
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: question on "molded" pasta dish

    J wrote:

    > I saw this dish in a cookbook in Borders one day, but when I went back
    > to decide if I really wanted the book, they'd changed the display and
    > so I couldn't find it. As best I can remember, cooked pasta was molded
    > in a large casserole dish, then the opening was filled (with ground
    > meat?). The whole thing was baked, then turned out to be sliced and
    > served.
    >
    > Could someone tell me what it's called, and guide me to a recipe?


    See a fairly recent post of mine:
    <http://groups.google.com/group/rec.food.cooking/msg/e497086c7733568f>

    Victor

  12. #12
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: question on "molded" pasta dish

    On May 21, 3:43*am, "ViLco" <villi...@tin.invalid> wrote:
    > J wrote:
    > > I'm sure someone here will know exactly what I mean.

    >
    > > I saw this dish in a cookbook in Borders one day, but when I went back
    > > to decide if I really wanted the book, they'd changed the display and
    > > so I couldn't find it. As best I can remember, cooked pasta was molded
    > > in a large casserole dish, then the opening was filled (with ground
    > > meat?). The whole thing was baked, then turned out to be sliced and
    > > served.

    >
    > > Could someone tell me what it's called, and guide me to a recipe?

    >
    > It's a timballo.http://www.google.it/images?hl=it&q=...F-8&source=uni...
    >
    > Like many other oven baked pasta dishes, it's based on cooked pasta and a
    > sauce, be it a meaty bolognese or a southern italian style tomatoey sauceor
    > any other sauce: tomato + peas, tomato + meat + peas, cheese sauce, cheese
    > and veggies sauce... Sometimes you find also bechamel sauce along with the
    > meatier sauces, to keep the timballo firmer.
    > It's all mixed, poured in a mold and oven-baked and then, just as you say,
    > turned upside down to be sliced and served.
    > One doesn't need a recipe, just pasta and sauce, or sauces if you want more
    > than one. Chooese your favorite pasta format, your favorite sauce/s and go.
    > --
    > * Vilco
    > No, non mi sono mai allenato, puzzavo di mio


    Wasn't that dish the "star" of "Big Night?" (That movie with Stanley
    Tucci....)

    N.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32