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Thread: quark uses?

  1. #1
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default quark uses?

    A cheese company has a stand at my city's farmers market where they sell
    a very tasty quark. Besides being an alternative to sour cream, how do
    any of you use quark in the kitchen. Also, how is it used in Eastern
    Europe?

    D.M.

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: quark uses?

    On Tue, 06 Apr 2010 17:33:50 -0700, Don Martinich <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > A cheese company has a stand at my city's farmers market where they sell
    > a very tasty quark. Besides being an alternative to sour cream, how do
    > any of you use quark in the kitchen. Also, how is it used in Eastern
    > Europe?
    >

    I don't. I buy it and it expires w/o me doing anything with it.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: quark uses?

    On Tue, 06 Apr 2010 17:33:50 -0700, Don Martinich wrote:

    > Also, how is it used in Eastern Europe?


    Got any dust mites handy?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milbenkäse

    Doesn't that first picture just make your moth water?

    -sw

  4. #4
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: quark uses?

    On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 20:58:36 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

    > On Tue, 06 Apr 2010 17:33:50 -0700, Don Martinich wrote:
    >
    >> Also, how is it used in Eastern Europe?

    >
    > Got any dust mites handy?
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milbenkäse
    >
    > Doesn't that first picture just make your moth water?
    >
    > -sw


    i don't trust quark. it changes on you if you so much as look at it funny.

    your pal,
    heisenberg

  5. #5
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: quark uses?

    Don Martinich <[email protected]> wrote:

    > A cheese company has a stand at my city's farmers market where they sell
    > a very tasty quark. Besides being an alternative to sour cream, how do
    > any of you use quark in the kitchen. Also, how is it used in Eastern
    > Europe?


    It is good for Kräuterquark (Quark with herbs, for example chives) and
    for Liptauer (Liptovsky syr), originally from Slovakia (but Hungarians
    will tell you that Liptó used to be Hungarian), but now an Austrian
    national dish. It is a mix of Quark with spices and herbs and can be
    spread or a dip. In Austria, Quark is called Topfen. Quark is also
    good for Käsekuchen (cheesecake).

    Victor

  6. #6
    Default User Guest

    Default Re: quark uses?


    "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1i5h2k9wetv6w.1mrsk5oqy35tw$.[email protected]. .
    > On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 20:58:36 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 06 Apr 2010 17:33:50 -0700, Don Martinich wrote:
    >>
    >>> Also, how is it used in Eastern Europe?

    >>
    >> Got any dust mites handy?
    >>
    >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milbenkäse
    >>
    >> Doesn't that first picture just make your moth water?
    >>
    >> -sw

    >
    > i don't trust quark. it changes on you if you so much as look at it
    > funny.


    Strange.



    Brian



  7. #7
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: quark uses?

    Victor wrote on Wed, 7 Apr 2010 23:58:01 +0200:

    >> A cheese company has a stand at my city's farmers market
    >> where they sell a very tasty quark. Besides being an
    >> alternative to sour cream, how do any of you use quark in the
    >> kitchen. Also, how is it used in Eastern Europe?


    > It is good for Kräuterquark (Quark with herbs, for example
    > chives) and for Liptauer (Liptovsky syr), originally from
    > Slovakia (but Hungarians will tell you that Liptó used to be
    > Hungarian), but now an Austrian national dish. It is a mix of
    > Quark with spices and herbs and can be spread or a dip. In
    > Austria, Quark is called Topfen. Quark is also good for
    > Käsekuchen (cheesecake).


    Any idea where the different bacteria in the different cultures are
    discussed? I can think of a lot of slightly different cultures like
    quark, the various yoghurts, kefir, ricotta, mascarpone etc.

    I don't want to make the cheeses and I know that I can get an active
    culture by buying unpasteurized forms.
    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  8. #8
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: quark uses?

    On Apr 6, 6:58*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > On Tue, 06 Apr 2010 17:33:50 -0700, Don Martinich wrote:
    > > Also, how is it used in Eastern Europe?

    >
    > Got any dust mites handy?
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milbenkäse
    >
    > Doesn't that first picture just make your moth water?
    >
    > -sw


    um, no.

    Sometimes I wish I didn't know about the bacteria and other organisms
    that it takes to make some of the yummy things
    we eat.................ewwwwwwwwwwwwwwww

  9. #9
    whirled peas Guest

    Default Re: quark uses?

    Default User wrote:
    > "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:1i5h2k9wetv6w.1mrsk5oqy35tw$.[email protected]. .
    >> On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 20:58:36 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Tue, 06 Apr 2010 17:33:50 -0700, Don Martinich wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Also, how is it used in Eastern Europe?
    >>> Got any dust mites handy?
    >>>
    >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milbenkäse
    >>>
    >>> Doesn't that first picture just make your moth water?
    >>>
    >>> -sw

    >> i don't trust quark. it changes on you if you so much as look at it
    >> funny.

    >
    > Strange.
    >
    >
    >
    > Brian
    >
    >

    In a third of a moment I was charmed by your colorful remark. In truth,
    it is beautiful. :-)

  10. #10
    Kris Guest

    Default Re: quark uses?

    On Apr 6, 8:33*pm, Don Martinich <dmartin...@att.net> wrote:
    > A cheese company has a stand at my city's farmers market where they sell
    > a very tasty quark. Besides being an alternative to sour cream, how do
    > any of you use quark in the kitchen. Also, how is it used in Eastern
    > Europe?
    >
    > D.M.


    You can use it to make Swedish saffrron buns, a la Santa Lucia.

    Kris

  11. #11
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: quark uses?

    On Wed, 7 Apr 2010 17:25:39 -0500, Default User wrote:

    > "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:1i5h2k9wetv6w.1mrsk5oqy35tw$.[email protected]. .
    >> On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 20:58:36 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Tue, 06 Apr 2010 17:33:50 -0700, Don Martinich wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Also, how is it used in Eastern Europe?
    >>>
    >>> Got any dust mites handy?
    >>>
    >>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milbenkäse
    >>>
    >>> Doesn't that first picture just make your moth water?
    >>>
    >>> -sw

    >>
    >> i don't trust quark. it changes on you if you so much as look at it
    >> funny.

    >
    > Strange.
    >
    > Brian


    <snort>

    your pal,
    blake

  12. #12
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: quark uses?

    On Wed, 07 Apr 2010 17:29:06 -0700, whirled peas wrote:

    > Default User wrote:
    >> "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:1i5h2k9wetv6w.1mrsk5oqy35tw$.[email protected]. .
    >>> On Tue, 6 Apr 2010 20:58:36 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Tue, 06 Apr 2010 17:33:50 -0700, Don Martinich wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Also, how is it used in Eastern Europe?
    >>>> Got any dust mites handy?
    >>>>
    >>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milbenkäse
    >>>>
    >>>> Doesn't that first picture just make your moth water?
    >>>>
    >>>> -sw
    >>> i don't trust quark. it changes on you if you so much as look at it
    >>> funny.

    >>
    >> Strange.
    >>
    >> Brian
    >>

    > In a third of a moment I was charmed by your colorful remark. In truth,
    > it is beautiful. :-)


    from top to bottom.

    your pal,
    blake

  13. #13
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: quark uses?

    James Silverton <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Any idea where the different bacteria in the different cultures are
    > discussed? I can think of a lot of slightly different cultures like
    > quark, the various yoghurts, kefir, ricotta, mascarpone etc.


    Here are some links:

    <http://nsdl.niscair.res.in/bitstream/123456789/117/1/dairymicrobiology.pdf>
    (from page 16 on)

    <http://www.danisco-genencor.com/wps/wcm/connect/danisco/corporate/products%20and%20services/product%20range/cultures/dairy%20cultures/dairy_cultures_en.htm>

    <http://www.cargilltexturizing.com/products/cultures/cts_prod_cult_app_lactic.shtml>

    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermented_milk_products>

    <http://textbookofbacteriology.net/lactics_5.html>

    <http://www.saunalahti.fi/~marian1/gourmet/i_milk.htm>

    <http://www.germancorner.com/recipes/hints/cheesemk.html>

    Victor


  14. #14
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: quark uses?

    Victor wrote on Thu, 8 Apr 2010 23:24:25 +0200:

    >> Any idea where the different bacteria in the different
    >> cultures are discussed? I can think of a lot of slightly
    >> different cultures like quark, the various yoghurts, kefir,
    >> ricotta, mascarpone etc.


    > Here are some links:


    > <http://nsdl.niscair.res.in/bitstream...117/1/dairymic
    > robiology.pdf> (from page 16 on)


    > <http://www.danisco-genencor.com/wps/.../danisco/corpo
    > rate/products%20and%20services/product%20range/cultures/dairy%
    > 20cultures/dairy_cultures_en.htm>


    > <http://www.cargilltexturizing.com/pr...ures/cts_prod_
    > cult_app_lactic.shtml>


    > <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermented_milk_products>


    > <http://textbookofbacteriology.net/lactics_5.html>


    > <http://www.saunalahti.fi/~marian1/gourmet/i_milk.htm>


    > <http://www.germancorner.com/recipes/hints/cheesemk.html>


    Thanks Victor!

    I'll store those references for a little while until I have time to look
    at them.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  15. #15
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: quark uses?


    "Don Martinich" schrieb :
    >A cheese company has a stand at my city's farmers market where they sell
    > a very tasty quark. Besides being an alternative to sour cream, how do


    No, it isn't. Topfen (quark) isn't sour.

    > any of you use quark in the kitchen.


    Topfenstrudel, Topfenpalatschinken, Topfengolatschen, Topfennockerln,
    Topfenschmarrn, Topfentascherln, .......

    > Also, how is it used in Eastern Europe?
    >

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner


  16. #16
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: quark uses?

    In article <hpsa6m$61n$[email protected]>,
    "Michael Kuettner" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Don Martinich" schrieb :
    > >A cheese company has a stand at my city's farmers market where they sell
    > > a very tasty quark. Besides being an alternative to sour cream, how do

    >
    > No, it isn't. Topfen (quark) isn't sour.
    >


    Here in the U.S. what we call sour cream isn't really what you would
    describe as sour. It's kind of sweetish with a tang. I'm talking about
    the common commercial dairy product. I use it to make paprikash. Next
    time I get some quark I'm going to mix it half and half with some feta
    and add some carraway seed.

    D.M.

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