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Thread: Quail eggs, nu?

  1. #1
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Quail eggs, nu?

    OK, to all you old time r.f.c denizens.

    Made my monthly pilgramage to the great city of
    (Metro) Houston, and hit my oriental store. Heh!
    On a lark, I picked up a can of salted quail eggs.
    Made/laid/packed in Thailand. (Steve can you
    help me out on this? Hello? (sound of crickets...))

    So what do I do with them? I found I can deep fry them,
    put them in wonton skins and fry them, serve with a
    variety of sauces. Other than that?

    Alex, morphing into SOUPERMAN!

  2. #2
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?



    Chemiker wrote:
    >
    > OK, to all you old time r.f.c denizens.
    >
    > Made my monthly pilgramage to the great city of
    > (Metro) Houston, and hit my oriental store. Heh!
    > On a lark, I picked up a can of salted quail eggs.
    > Made/laid/packed in Thailand. (Steve can you
    > help me out on this? Hello? (sound of crickets...))
    >
    > So what do I do with them? I found I can deep fry them,
    > put them in wonton skins and fry them, serve with a
    > variety of sauces. Other than that?
    >
    > Alex, morphing into SOUPERMAN!



    Cook them and use them atop rice porridge or a bowl of soup noodles.
    Make mooncakes and put a quail egg yolk in there instead of the usual
    duck egg yolk
    Put them atop fried rice.
    Add to a salad.

  3. #3
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    Chemiker wrote:
    >
    > OK, to all you old time r.f.c denizens.


    In my experience, all bird eggs are the same,
    differing only in size, shell coloration, and
    yolk coloration.

    Being canned, yours are probably not so good,
    as compared to a freshly boiled egg.

    It's main appeal would be decorative.

  4. #4
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    Mark wrote:

    > In my experience, all bird eggs are the same,
    > differing only in size, shell coloration, and
    > yolk coloration.


    You've obviously never had a gull egg!

    I've found that the whites of duck eggs have more flavor than the whites of
    chicken eggs. And the eggs we buy from the farmers' market have a markedly
    better flavor than supermarket eggs.

    Try this: Make simple scrambled eggs from supermarket eggs, adding a tiny
    bit of yellow food coloring. At the same time, make simple scrambled eggs
    using eggs from hens which have been raised on a farm where they were free
    to roam around and scratch for food all day.

    Serve both to an objective person and see if he or she can tell which eggs
    came from the free-range hen. I know that Lin and I could.

    Bob


  5. #5
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    In article <[email protected]>, Arri London <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Chemiker wrote:
    > >
    > > OK, to all you old time r.f.c denizens.
    > >
    > > Made my monthly pilgramage to the great city of
    > > (Metro) Houston, and hit my oriental store. Heh!
    > > On a lark, I picked up a can of salted quail eggs.
    > > Made/laid/packed in Thailand. (Steve can you
    > > help me out on this? Hello? (sound of crickets...))
    > >
    > > So what do I do with them? I found I can deep fry them,
    > > put them in wonton skins and fry them, serve with a
    > > variety of sauces. Other than that?
    > >
    > > Alex, morphing into SOUPERMAN!

    >
    >
    > Cook them and use them atop rice porridge or a bowl of soup noodles.
    > Make mooncakes and put a quail egg yolk in there instead of the usual
    > duck egg yolk
    > Put them atop fried rice.
    > Add to a salad.


    Quail eggs are served as Sashimi at Japanese restaurants.

    They are quite good that way... But, I happen to LIKE raw eggs.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

  6. #6
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Chemiker wrote:
    > >
    > > OK, to all you old time r.f.c denizens.

    >
    > In my experience, all bird eggs are the same,
    > differing only in size, shell coloration, and
    > yolk coloration.
    >
    > Being canned, yours are probably not so good,
    > as compared to a freshly boiled egg.
    >
    > It's main appeal would be decorative.


    Oops! Ok, I came in late on this thread so did not realize he was
    talking about canned quail eggs, sorry!

    I purchase them at the asian market from time to time and just toss them
    whole into stir fry's and sometimes asian soups.

    The yolk is usually very creamy and the whites a bit rubbery, but I like
    them and dad considers them to be a special treat when I do use them.

    They also work well tossed whole into salads.

    Sometimes I'll just snack on them straight out of the can.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

  7. #7
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    In article <004ee34d$0$14665$[email protected]>,
    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > Mark wrote:
    >
    > > In my experience, all bird eggs are the same,
    > > differing only in size, shell coloration, and
    > > yolk coloration.

    >
    > You've obviously never had a gull egg!
    >
    > I've found that the whites of duck eggs have more flavor than the whites of
    > chicken eggs. And the eggs we buy from the farmers' market have a markedly
    > better flavor than supermarket eggs.
    >
    > Try this: Make simple scrambled eggs from supermarket eggs, adding a tiny
    > bit of yellow food coloring. At the same time, make simple scrambled eggs
    > using eggs from hens which have been raised on a farm where they were free
    > to roam around and scratch for food all day.
    >
    > Serve both to an objective person and see if he or she can tell which eggs
    > came from the free-range hen. I know that Lin and I could.
    >
    > Bob


    So could I.

    I miss eating emu eggs. They are totally different. :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

  8. #8
    sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    On Sat, 09 May 2009 19:14:31 -0500, Chemiker wrote:

    > OK, to all you old time r.f.c denizens.
    >
    > Made my monthly pilgramage to the great city of
    > (Metro) Houston, and hit my oriental store. Heh!
    > On a lark, I picked up a can of salted quail eggs.
    > Made/laid/packed in Thailand. (Steve can you
    > help me out on this? Hello? (sound of crickets...))


    I have a can of them that I bought last mnonth. I was goint o
    pickle them.

    They're really used a a ganish and for presentation, mostly. If you
    have a lot of patience and wantr to go for presentation: Devlied
    eggs.

    I'm curiuous about your "salted" qualifier. In asian food, this
    could mean anything. Pickled, brined, and more often: fermented.
    Mine have salt in them, but they don't say "salted". Hopefully they
    just beanm thaat they're poacked in vrine, but not too salty. Ever
    try a salted duck egg? They taste like a salt lick.

    They're much harder than your averge chicken egg, so keep that in
    mind whatever you do tiwht them. I don't think they taste much
    different than a canned chcken would. I've bought them fresh before
    and all the yolk busted when I tried to do some sunny-side up's.
    Boiling and peeling the rest were a PITA.

    -sw

  9. #9
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    On Sat, 09 May 2009 19:14:31 -0500, Chemiker
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >OK, to all you old time r.f.c denizens.
    >
    >Made my monthly pilgramage to the great city of
    >(Metro) Houston, and hit my oriental store. Heh!
    >On a lark, I picked up a can of salted quail eggs.
    >Made/laid/packed in Thailand. (Steve can you
    >help me out on this? Hello? (sound of crickets...))
    >
    >So what do I do with them? I found I can deep fry them,
    >put them in wonton skins and fry them, serve with a
    >variety of sauces. Other than that?


    Thanks for all the advice. I haven't opened the can yet,
    but I think I'll divide them, and try the quail egg dim sum
    plus the fried rice. Maybe pickle a couple in with my
    jardiniera or the marinated daikon I'm going to do today..

    Thanks again.

    Alex

  10. #10
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    sqwertz wrote:
    > On Sat, 09 May 2009 19:14:31 -0500, Chemiker wrote:
    >
    >> OK, to all you old time r.f.c denizens.
    >>
    >> Made my monthly pilgramage to the great city of
    >> (Metro) Houston, and hit my oriental store. Heh!
    >> On a lark, I picked up a can of salted quail eggs.
    >> Made/laid/packed in Thailand. (Steve can you
    >> help me out on this? Hello? (sound of crickets...))

    >
    > I have a can of them that I bought last mnonth. I was goint o
    > pickle them.
    >
    > They're really used a a ganish and for presentation, mostly. If you
    > have a lot of patience and wantr to go for presentation: Devlied
    > eggs.
    >
    > I'm curiuous about your "salted" qualifier. In asian food, this
    > could mean anything. Pickled, brined, and more often: fermented.
    > Mine have salt in them, but they don't say "salted". Hopefully they
    > just beanm thaat they're poacked in vrine, but not too salty. Ever
    > try a salted duck egg? They taste like a salt lick.
    >
    > They're much harder than your averge chicken egg, so keep that in
    > mind whatever you do tiwht them. I don't think they taste much
    > different than a canned chcken would. I've bought them fresh before
    > and all the yolk busted when I tried to do some sunny-side up's.
    > Boiling and peeling the rest were a PITA.


    And tio think I'd been sober for two days when I wrote that. I just
    installed a new OS and apparently forgot to turn my spell-checker on.
    And my eyesight.

    -sw

  11. #11
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    Chemiker wrote:
    > OK, to all you old time r.f.c denizens.
    >
    > Made my monthly pilgramage to the great city of
    > (Metro) Houston, and hit my oriental store. Heh!
    > On a lark, I picked up a can of salted quail eggs.
    > Made/laid/packed in Thailand. (Steve can you
    > help me out on this? Hello? (sound of crickets...))


    I saw this the other day and it looked a little gross to me, but maybe
    it'll do ya:

    http://www.tastespotting.com/detail/631

    Serene
    --
    42 Magazine, celebrating life with meaning. Inaugural issue is here!
    http://42magazine.com

    "But here's a handy hint: if your fabulous theory for ending war and
    all other human conflict will not survive an online argument with
    humourless feminists who are not afraid to throw rape around as an
    example, your theory needs work." -- Aqua, alt.polyamory

  12. #12
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    On Mon, 11 May 2009 12:25:33 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

    > sqwertz wrote:
    >> On Sat, 09 May 2009 19:14:31 -0500, Chemiker wrote:
    >>
    >>> OK, to all you old time r.f.c denizens.
    >>>
    >>> Made my monthly pilgramage to the great city of
    >>> (Metro) Houston, and hit my oriental store. Heh!
    >>> On a lark, I picked up a can of salted quail eggs.
    >>> Made/laid/packed in Thailand. (Steve can you
    >>> help me out on this? Hello? (sound of crickets...))

    >>
    >> I have a can of them that I bought last mnonth. I was goint o
    >> pickle them.
    >>
    >> They're really used a a ganish and for presentation, mostly. If you
    >> have a lot of patience and wantr to go for presentation: Devlied
    >> eggs.
    >>
    >> I'm curiuous about your "salted" qualifier. In asian food, this
    >> could mean anything. Pickled, brined, and more often: fermented.
    >> Mine have salt in them, but they don't say "salted". Hopefully they
    >> just beanm thaat they're poacked in vrine, but not too salty. Ever
    >> try a salted duck egg? They taste like a salt lick.
    >>
    >> They're much harder than your averge chicken egg, so keep that in
    >> mind whatever you do tiwht them. I don't think they taste much
    >> different than a canned chcken would. I've bought them fresh before
    >> and all the yolk busted when I tried to do some sunny-side up's.
    >> Boiling and peeling the rest were a PITA.

    >
    > And tio think I'd been sober for two days when I wrote that. I just
    > installed a new OS and apparently forgot to turn my spell-checker on.
    > And my eyesight.
    >
    > -sw


    i was wondering, steve. the 'poacked in vrine' looked at first blush like
    'poached in urine.' i don't even think the chinese are doing that.

    your pal,
    blake

  13. #13
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    On Tue, 12 May 2009 16:15:06 GMT, blake murphy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mon, 11 May 2009 12:25:33 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> sqwertz wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 09 May 2009 19:14:31 -0500, Chemiker wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> OK, to all you old time r.f.c denizens.


    >
    >i was wondering, steve. the 'poacked in vrine' looked at first blush like
    >'poached in urine.' i don't even think the chinese are doing that.
    >


    Y'know blake, I sometimes don't care much for your posts.
    At the same time, you have a certain wry humor (may I say,
    Twisted?) that tickles my fancy.

    I appreciate your comments, however acidic.

    Alex

  14. #14
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    On Tue, 12 May 2009 16:15:06 GMT, blake murphy wrote:

    > i was wondering, steve. the 'poacked in vrine' looked at first blush like
    > 'poached in urine.' i don't even think the chinese are doing that.


    Japanese.

    -sw

  15. #15
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    On Mon, 11 May 2009 18:01:42 -0700, Serene Vannoy wrote:

    > I saw this the other day and it looked a little gross to me, but maybe
    > it'll do ya:
    >
    > http://www.tastespotting.com/detail/631


    That's pretty bad. But the basic scotch egg idea is pretty good.
    It would be hard to wrap sausage worund those tiny eggs evenly, but
    worth a shot.

    -sw

  16. #16
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    On Tue, 12 May 2009 15:07:13 -0500, Chemiker wrote:

    > On Tue, 12 May 2009 16:15:06 GMT, blake murphy
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 11 May 2009 12:25:33 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >>> sqwertz wrote:
    >>>> On Sat, 09 May 2009 19:14:31 -0500, Chemiker wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> OK, to all you old time r.f.c denizens.

    >
    >>
    >>i was wondering, steve. the 'poacked in vrine' looked at first blush like
    >>'poached in urine.' i don't even think the chinese are doing that.
    >>

    >
    > Y'know blake, I sometimes don't care much for your posts.
    > At the same time, you have a certain wry humor (may I say,
    > Twisted?) that tickles my fancy.
    >
    > I appreciate your comments, however acidic.
    >
    > Alex


    glad to hear i'm semi-appealing.

    your pal,
    blake

  17. #17
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    On Tue, 12 May 2009 19:40:08 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

    > On Mon, 11 May 2009 18:01:42 -0700, Serene Vannoy wrote:
    >
    >> I saw this the other day and it looked a little gross to me, but maybe
    >> it'll do ya:
    >>
    >> http://www.tastespotting.com/detail/631

    >
    > That's pretty bad. But the basic scotch egg idea is pretty good.
    > It would be hard to wrap sausage worund those tiny eggs evenly, but
    > worth a shot.
    >
    > -sw


    i've thought about that, too. it must be hard to get the things to hold
    together in deep-frying - you'd thing the sausage would give up too much
    fat for the breadcrumbs to handle. but evidently lots of people have the
    technique down.

    your pal,
    blake

  18. #18
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    blake murphy wrote:

    > i've thought about that, too. it must be hard to get the things to hold
    > together in deep-frying - you'd thing the sausage would give up too much
    > fat for the breadcrumbs to handle. but evidently lots of people have the
    > technique down.


    On a traditional scotch egg using the chub sausage (think Jimmy Dean), the
    bread crumbs (Progresso in the blue cans) show no sign of fat at all when
    baked. It's amazing how much oil those bread crumbs will repel. There is
    no grease under the tray on which I cooked them either.

    I don't deep fry my scotch eggs. No reason to, really. Baking on a rack
    is fine.

    -sw

  19. #19
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Quail eggs, nu?

    On Wed, 13 May 2009 14:18:31 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

    > blake murphy wrote:
    >
    >> i've thought about that, too. it must be hard to get the things to hold
    >> together in deep-frying - you'd thing the sausage would give up too much
    >> fat for the breadcrumbs to handle. but evidently lots of people have the
    >> technique down.

    >
    > On a traditional scotch egg using the chub sausage (think Jimmy Dean), the
    > bread crumbs (Progresso in the blue cans) show no sign of fat at all when
    > baked. It's amazing how much oil those bread crumbs will repel. There is
    > no grease under the tray on which I cooked them either.
    >
    > I don't deep fry my scotch eggs. No reason to, really. Baking on a rack
    > is fine.
    >
    > -sw


    i guess it's one of life's sweet mysteries.

    your pal,
    blake

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