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Thread: Quackery In Cooking

  1. #1
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Quackery In Cooking

    I have the TV on most of the day, even though I'm not
    watching most of the time. I'm usually working, and
    just have the TV as sort of background music. And
    of course, I like cooking shows. If Lidia Bastianich
    had a 24 hour channel, that's what would be on my set
    most of the time.

    Sometimes I get desperate. Sometimes I'll tune in the
    Spanish-language cooking shows from V-me. Or an
    infomercial for the Magic Bullet. (I'd rather have
    an infomercial with Ron Popeil in it -- where are
    you, Ron?)

    Rarely, I'll tune in to Cooking Time, the Korean
    language cooking show. The host often uses obscure
    or weird ingrediants, like oligosaccharide or
    slim eel fish paste. But what really gets me is
    the food quackery. She'll say this is food is good
    for the joints, or that food is good for the muscles,
    or this other stuff is good for your brain.

    Yesterday, she was saying that because the salad
    she was making was made with raw vegetables which
    are still alive and have their life force, you
    shouldn't mix the salad dressing into the salad
    with your hands. You should use chopsticks.
    If the vegetables had been cooked, you could go
    ahead and use your hands. She wasn't clear on
    whether the life force from your hands would
    ruin the salad, or whether there was some ill
    effect you'd receive from the salad through your
    hands.

    You learn something about other cultures by
    watching their TV. Koreans are a bit kooky.

  2. #2
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking

    On Feb 1, 7:16*am, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > I have the TV on most of the day, even though I'm not
    > watching most of the time. *I'm usually working, and
    > just have the TV as sort of background music. *And
    > of course, I like cooking shows. *If Lidia Bastianich
    > had a 24 hour channel, that's what would be on my set
    > most of the time.
    >
    > Sometimes I get desperate. *Sometimes I'll tune in the
    > Spanish-language cooking shows from V-me. *Or an
    > infomercial for the Magic Bullet. *(I'd rather have
    > an infomercial with Ron Popeil in it -- where are
    > you, Ron?)
    >
    > Rarely, I'll tune in to Cooking Time, the Korean
    > language cooking show. *The host often uses obscure
    > or weird ingrediants, like oligosaccharide or
    > slim eel fish paste. *But what really gets me is
    > the food quackery. *She'll say this is food is good
    > for the joints, or that food is good for the muscles,
    > or this other stuff is good for your brain.
    >
    > Yesterday, she was saying that because the salad
    > she was making was made with raw vegetables which
    > are still alive and have their life force, you
    > shouldn't mix the salad dressing into the salad
    > with your hands. *You should use chopsticks.
    > If the vegetables had been cooked, you could go
    > ahead and use your hands. *She wasn't clear on
    > whether the life force from your hands would
    > ruin the salad, or whether there was some ill
    > effect you'd receive from the salad through your
    > hands.
    >
    > You learn something about other cultures by
    > watching their TV. *Koreans are a bit kooky.


    I wouldn't use the term quackery.

    There are elements in vegetables and herbs that ARE good for different
    elements of the body. All medicine is basically plant based.

    Ever heard of homeopathy? The same applies for homeopathic medicine,
    use only the glass dropper, never touch the medicine
    with the hands, it changes the chemistry and energy of the medicine.

    In other cultures herbs and plants are more trusted as medicine than
    chemicals.

    It all depends on what you have been indoctrinated with, or taught, or
    believe.

    I, for one, am open to all cultural practices of healing. Some are
    amazingly effective. Some are more placebos.

    The mind-body connection is probably the most important part of
    healing in the end.

    Don't make fun of what you have not educated yourself about.
    Sometimes, if you pay attention or do some research, you
    can learn a lot.


  3. #3
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > I have the TV on most of the day, even though I'm not
    > watching most of the time. I'm usually working, and
    > just have the TV as sort of background music. And
    > of course, I like cooking shows. If Lidia Bastianich
    > had a 24 hour channel, that's what would be on my set
    > most of the time.
    >
    > Sometimes I get desperate. Sometimes I'll tune in the
    > Spanish-language cooking shows from V-me. Or an
    > infomercial for the Magic Bullet. (I'd rather have
    > an infomercial with Ron Popeil in it -- where are
    > you, Ron?)
    >
    > Rarely, I'll tune in to Cooking Time, the Korean
    > language cooking show. The host often uses obscure
    > or weird ingrediants, like oligosaccharide or
    > slim eel fish paste. But what really gets me is
    > the food quackery. She'll say this is food is good
    > for the joints, or that food is good for the muscles,
    > or this other stuff is good for your brain.
    >
    > Yesterday, she was saying that because the salad
    > she was making was made with raw vegetables which
    > are still alive and have their life force, you
    > shouldn't mix the salad dressing into the salad
    > with your hands. You should use chopsticks.
    > If the vegetables had been cooked, you could go
    > ahead and use your hands. She wasn't clear on
    > whether the life force from your hands would
    > ruin the salad, or whether there was some ill
    > effect you'd receive from the salad through your
    > hands.
    >
    > You learn something about other cultures by
    > watching their TV. Koreans are a bit kooky.


    I dunno that the first things are quackery. The last part seems
    most dubious to me though.

    --
    Jean B.

  4. #4
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking

    On Mon, 1 Feb 2010 07:22:29 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Yesterday, she was saying that because the salad
    >> she was making was made with raw vegetables which
    >> are still alive and have their life force, you
    >> shouldn't mix the salad dressing into the salad
    >> with your hands. *You should use chopsticks.
    >> If the vegetables had been cooked, you could go
    >> ahead and use your hands. *She wasn't clear on
    >> whether the life force from your hands would
    >> ruin the salad, or whether there was some ill
    >> effect you'd receive from the salad through your
    >> hands.
    >>
    >> You learn something about other cultures by
    >> watching their TV. *Koreans are a bit kooky.

    >
    >I wouldn't use the term quackery.
    >
    >There are elements in vegetables and herbs that ARE good for different
    >elements of the body. All medicine is basically plant based.


    No, although there is certainly a lot of it that is.
    >
    >Ever heard of homeopathy? The same applies for homeopathic medicine,
    >use only the glass dropper, never touch the medicine
    >with the hands, it changes the chemistry and energy of the medicine.


    Homeopathy is a crock of ****....something else one should keep one's
    hands out of.
    >
    >In other cultures herbs and plants are more trusted as medicine than
    >chemicals.
    >
    >It all depends on what you have been indoctrinated with, or taught, or
    >believe.
    >
    >I, for one, am open to all cultural practices of healing. Some are
    >amazingly effective. Some are more placebos.
    >
    >The mind-body connection is probably the most important part of
    >healing in the end.


    Nonsense, but if you have some peer-reviewed journal publications
    purporting to prove this, I'd be willing to look at them.
    >
    >Don't make fun of what you have not educated yourself about.
    >Sometimes, if you pay attention or do some research, you
    >can learn a lot.


    No, it is perfectly all right to make fun of saying that salad is
    alive and should only be touched with chopsticks but that cooked
    vegetables can be touched with the hands. It is not cultural, either,
    but pure, unadulterated BS about basic science.

    Boron

  5. #5
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking



    "Boron Elgar" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mon, 1 Feb 2010 07:22:29 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags
    >>Ever heard of homeopathy? The same applies for homeopathic medicine,
    >>use only the glass dropper, never touch the medicine
    >>with the hands, it changes the chemistry and energy of the medicine.

    >
    > Homeopathy is a crock of ****....something else one should keep one's
    > hands out of.


    LOL *applause*


    > Boron



    --
    --
    https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  6. #6
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking



    "Steve B" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > reply: I, personally, have been investigating the practices of
    > sacrificing chickens, moon watching, a reverse osmotic electrolysis food
    > crisper, magnetic butter dishes, and psychokinetic blending of pancake
    > mix. So far, the results are pretty amazing, and I do hope my source of
    > happy mushrooms does not dry up or get apprehended.


    <g>

    --
    --
    https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  7. #7
    Steve B Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking


    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I have the TV on most of the day, even though I'm not
    > watching most of the time. I'm usually working, and
    > just have the TV as sort of background music. And
    > of course, I like cooking shows. If Lidia Bastianich
    > had a 24 hour channel, that's what would be on my set
    > most of the time.
    >
    > Sometimes I get desperate. Sometimes I'll tune in the
    > Spanish-language cooking shows from V-me. Or an
    > infomercial for the Magic Bullet. (I'd rather have
    > an infomercial with Ron Popeil in it -- where are
    > you, Ron?)
    >
    > Rarely, I'll tune in to Cooking Time, the Korean
    > language cooking show. The host often uses obscure
    > or weird ingrediants, like oligosaccharide or
    > slim eel fish paste. But what really gets me is
    > the food quackery. She'll say this is food is good
    > for the joints, or that food is good for the muscles,
    > or this other stuff is good for your brain.
    >
    > Yesterday, she was saying that because the salad
    > she was making was made with raw vegetables which
    > are still alive and have their life force, you
    > shouldn't mix the salad dressing into the salad
    > with your hands. You should use chopsticks.
    > If the vegetables had been cooked, you could go
    > ahead and use your hands. She wasn't clear on
    > whether the life force from your hands would
    > ruin the salad, or whether there was some ill
    > effect you'd receive from the salad through your
    > hands.
    >
    > You learn something about other cultures by
    > watching their TV. Koreans are a bit kooky.


    Sounds to me she's smoking some of the greens.

    Steve



  8. #8
    Steve B Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking


    "ImStillMags" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Feb 1, 7:16 am, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > I have the TV on most of the day, even though I'm not
    > watching most of the time. I'm usually working, and
    > just have the TV as sort of background music. And
    > of course, I like cooking shows. If Lidia Bastianich
    > had a 24 hour channel, that's what would be on my set
    > most of the time.
    >
    > Sometimes I get desperate. Sometimes I'll tune in the
    > Spanish-language cooking shows from V-me. Or an
    > infomercial for the Magic Bullet. (I'd rather have
    > an infomercial with Ron Popeil in it -- where are
    > you, Ron?)
    >
    > Rarely, I'll tune in to Cooking Time, the Korean
    > language cooking show. The host often uses obscure
    > or weird ingrediants, like oligosaccharide or
    > slim eel fish paste. But what really gets me is
    > the food quackery. She'll say this is food is good
    > for the joints, or that food is good for the muscles,
    > or this other stuff is good for your brain.
    >
    > Yesterday, she was saying that because the salad
    > she was making was made with raw vegetables which
    > are still alive and have their life force, you
    > shouldn't mix the salad dressing into the salad
    > with your hands. You should use chopsticks.
    > If the vegetables had been cooked, you could go
    > ahead and use your hands. She wasn't clear on
    > whether the life force from your hands would
    > ruin the salad, or whether there was some ill
    > effect you'd receive from the salad through your
    > hands.
    >
    > You learn something about other cultures by
    > watching their TV. Koreans are a bit kooky.


    I wouldn't use the term quackery.

    There are elements in vegetables and herbs that ARE good for different
    elements of the body. All medicine is basically plant based.

    Ever heard of homeopathy? The same applies for homeopathic medicine,
    use only the glass dropper, never touch the medicine
    with the hands, it changes the chemistry and energy of the medicine.

    In other cultures herbs and plants are more trusted as medicine than
    chemicals.

    It all depends on what you have been indoctrinated with, or taught, or
    believe.

    I, for one, am open to all cultural practices of healing. Some are
    amazingly effective. Some are more placebos.

    The mind-body connection is probably the most important part of
    healing in the end.

    Don't make fun of what you have not educated yourself about.
    Sometimes, if you pay attention or do some research, you
    can learn a lot.

    reply: I, personally, have been investigating the practices of sacrificing
    chickens, moon watching, a reverse osmotic electrolysis food crisper,
    magnetic butter dishes, and psychokinetic blending of pancake mix. So far,
    the results are pretty amazing, and I do hope my source of happy mushrooms
    does not dry up or get apprehended.

    Steve



  9. #9
    maxine in ri Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking

    On Feb 1, 10:31*am, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    > Mark Thorson wrote:
    > > I have the TV on most of the day, even though I'm not
    > > watching most of the time. *I'm usually working, and
    > > just have the TV as sort of background music. *And
    > > of course, I like cooking shows. *If Lidia Bastianich
    > > had a 24 hour channel, that's what would be on my set
    > > most of the time.

    >
    > > Sometimes I get desperate. *Sometimes I'll tune in the
    > > Spanish-language cooking shows from V-me. *Or an
    > > infomercial for the Magic Bullet. *(I'd rather have
    > > an infomercial with Ron Popeil in it -- where are
    > > you, Ron?)

    >
    > > Rarely, I'll tune in to Cooking Time, the Korean
    > > language cooking show. *The host often uses obscure
    > > or weird ingrediants, like oligosaccharide or
    > > slim eel fish paste. *But what really gets me is
    > > the food quackery. *She'll say this is food is good
    > > for the joints, or that food is good for the muscles,
    > > or this other stuff is good for your brain.

    >
    > > Yesterday, she was saying that because the salad
    > > she was making was made with raw vegetables which
    > > are still alive and have their life force, you
    > > shouldn't mix the salad dressing into the salad
    > > with your hands. *You should use chopsticks.
    > > If the vegetables had been cooked, you could go
    > > ahead and use your hands. *She wasn't clear on
    > > whether the life force from your hands would
    > > ruin the salad, or whether there was some ill
    > > effect you'd receive from the salad through your
    > > hands.

    >
    > > You learn something about other cultures by
    > > watching their TV. *Koreans are a bit kooky.

    >
    > I dunno that the first things are quackery. *The last part seems
    > most dubious to me though.


    Sounds like folk medicine or animism to me. I would bet it goes back
    to when folks would get sick if the uncooked veggies were handled by
    hand, but not cooked ones.

    maxine in ri

  10. #10
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking

    "Boron Elgar" wrote
    ImStillMags wrote:

    >>Ever heard of homeopathy? The same applies for homeopathic medicine,
    >>use only the glass dropper, never touch the medicine
    >>with the hands, it changes the chemistry and energy of the medicine.

    >
    > Homeopathy is a crock of ****....something else one should keep one's
    > hands out of.


    Much of it is but not all of it. It's based on observation, just like plant
    medicines.

    The terminology used in asian healing by 'eating the right food' comes off
    as quackery but some of it is based in solidly testable results. Like the
    chondritin/glucosamine pills and powders many now take to help control
    arthritis. Back in Japan, our Japanese Doc recommended I start also eating
    the shrimp tails and shells. They are simply a natural source of the same
    thing and the pill form wasnt working as well for me. Also, to use as many
    bone based deep broths (and not so much the canned type but more of a
    consomme sort you make at home that gels). Calcium and other bone
    strengthening things in there, and less salt by far when you make it at
    home.

    Apparently I work better with food sourced calcium, iron, and joint based
    things. That is *not* unusual and totally harmless.

    He's also the one that did the salt tolerance-reactive study which Don and I
    were part of. I'm not sodium reactive in blood pressure, Don is if he goes
    over 2,000mg a day but at 2,000mg a day or less, he has no changes. Doc
    recommended we aim for 1,500mg a day for him after the study but that leaves
    a little leeway for an unaccounted for 'snack'. Basically I seemed to have
    pretty much a Japanese native salt tolerance while Don is more the 'needs to
    keep an eye on it'.

    It isnt uncommon in Asia to find the Doctor is also well schooled in
    nutrition, unlike most of what I have encountered in the USA. If their
    methods are a little different because they tell you to eat more liver and
    fresh leafy greens vice prescribe iron pills, it's harmless. And no, they
    won't tell you silly things like not mixing live veggies with your hands ;-)
    They will tell you to eat a wider variety of fresh foods and not live off
    boxed 'American crap' like hamburger helper.


  11. #11
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking

    "Jean B." wrote
    > Mark Thorson wrote:


    >> Rarely, I'll tune in to Cooking Time, the Korean
    >> language cooking show. The host often uses obscure
    >> or weird ingrediants, like oligosaccharide or
    >> slim eel fish paste.


    Grin, normal stuff you can get in the markets there. Some of what we get
    sounds equally odd to them.

    >> But what really gets me is
    >> the food quackery. She'll say this is food is good
    >> for the joints, or that food is good for the muscles,
    >> or this other stuff is good for your brain.


    > I dunno that the first things are quackery. The last part seems most
    > dubious to me though.


    It is true the last part o touching the veggies is quackery, but at least on
    the stuff good for your bones and joints, they have some pretty good backing
    on what to eat. Not sure on 'good for your brain' but if your eyesight is
    starting to fail, they will often recommend certain vegetables high in the
    things that a lack of can affect eyesight. It's just part of a total
    package, not expected to replace the need for glasses or anything.


  12. #12
    Boron Elgar Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking

    On Mon, 1 Feb 2010 12:01:46 -0500, "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"Boron Elgar" wrote
    >ImStillMags wrote:
    >
    >>>Ever heard of homeopathy? The same applies for homeopathic medicine,
    >>>use only the glass dropper, never touch the medicine
    >>>with the hands, it changes the chemistry and energy of the medicine.

    >>
    >> Homeopathy is a crock of ****....something else one should keep one's
    >> hands out of.

    >
    >Much of it is but not all of it. It's based on observation, just like plant
    >medicines.


    No, really. All of it is. It has no basis whatsoever. It is quackery.
    >
    >The terminology used in asian healing by 'eating the right food' comes off
    >as quackery but some of it is based in solidly testable results. Like the
    >chondritin/glucosamine pills and powders many now take to help control
    >arthritis. Back in Japan, our Japanese Doc recommended I start also eating
    >the shrimp tails and shells. They are simply a natural source of the same
    >thing and the pill form wasnt working as well for me. Also, to use as many
    >bone based deep broths (and not so much the canned type but more of a
    >consomme sort you make at home that gels). Calcium and other bone
    >strengthening things in there, and less salt by far when you make it at
    >home.


    I did not say make any argument about what you mention above.
    >
    >Apparently I work better with food sourced calcium, iron, and joint based
    >things. That is *not* unusual and totally harmless.


    That has nothing to do with homeopathy.
    >
    >He's also the one that did the salt tolerance-reactive study which Don and I
    >were part of. I'm not sodium reactive in blood pressure, Don is if he goes
    >over 2,000mg a day but at 2,000mg a day or less, he has no changes. Doc
    >recommended we aim for 1,500mg a day for him after the study but that leaves
    >a little leeway for an unaccounted for 'snack'. Basically I seemed to have
    >pretty much a Japanese native salt tolerance while Don is more the 'needs to
    >keep an eye on it'.


    That is not homeopathy.
    >
    >It isnt uncommon in Asia to find the Doctor is also well schooled in
    >nutrition, unlike most of what I have encountered in the USA. If their
    >methods are a little different because they tell you to eat more liver and
    >fresh leafy greens vice prescribe iron pills, it's harmless.


    But that is not homeopathy.

    > And no, they
    >won't tell you silly things like not mixing live veggies with your hands ;-)
    >They will tell you to eat a wider variety of fresh foods and not live off
    >boxed 'American crap' like hamburger helper.


    And I have not criticized healthy eating, but I reiterate my utter
    disdain for homeopathy.

    Boron


    T

  13. #13
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking

    "maxine in ri" wrote

    > Sounds like folk medicine or animism to me. I would bet it goes back
    > to when folks would get sick if the uncooked veggies were handled by
    > hand, but not cooked ones.


    I'm trying to relate it to personal hygene here but it doesnt fix it if it's
    the person's hands as cooking the veggies first would make no difference
    there.


  14. #14
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking

    On Mon, 01 Feb 2010 10:46:07 -0500, Boron Elgar wrote:

    > On Mon, 1 Feb 2010 07:22:29 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>> Yesterday, she was saying that because the salad
    >>> she was making was made with raw vegetables which
    >>> are still alive and have their life force, you
    >>> shouldn't mix the salad dressing into the salad
    >>> with your hands. *You should use chopsticks.
    >>> If the vegetables had been cooked, you could go
    >>> ahead and use your hands. *She wasn't clear on
    >>> whether the life force from your hands would
    >>> ruin the salad, or whether there was some ill
    >>> effect you'd receive from the salad through your
    >>> hands.
    >>>
    >>> You learn something about other cultures by
    >>> watching their TV. *Koreans are a bit kooky.

    >>
    >>I wouldn't use the term quackery.
    >>
    >>There are elements in vegetables and herbs that ARE good for different
    >>elements of the body. All medicine is basically plant based.

    >
    > No, although there is certainly a lot of it that is.
    >>
    >>Ever heard of homeopathy? The same applies for homeopathic medicine,
    >>use only the glass dropper, never touch the medicine
    >>with the hands, it changes the chemistry and energy of the medicine.

    >
    > Homeopathy is a crock of ****....something else one should keep one's
    > hands out of.


    <snort>

    your pal,
    blake

  15. #15
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking

    On Feb 1, 10:22*am, ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> wrote:

    > There are elements in vegetables and herbs that ARE good for different
    > elements of the body. *All medicine is basically plant based.


    Insulin?

    > Ever heard of homeopathy? *The same applies for homeopathic medicine,
    > use only the glass dropper, never touch the medicine
    > with the hands, it changes the chemistry and energy of the medicine.
    >
    > In other cultures herbs and plants are more trusted as medicine than
    > chemicals.


    That doesn't prevent it from being complete bull****. Gullible fools
    are
    everywhere.

    Cindy Hamilton

  16. #16
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking

    On Mon, 1 Feb 2010 12:01:46 -0500, cshenk wrote:

    > "Boron Elgar" wrote
    > ImStillMags wrote:
    >
    >>>Ever heard of homeopathy? The same applies for homeopathic medicine,
    >>>use only the glass dropper, never touch the medicine
    >>>with the hands, it changes the chemistry and energy of the medicine.

    >>
    >> Homeopathy is a crock of ****....something else one should keep one's
    >> hands out of.

    >
    > Much of it is but not all of it. It's based on observation, just like plant
    > medicines.
    >
    > The terminology used in asian healing by 'eating the right food' comes off
    > as quackery but some of it is based in solidly testable results. Like the
    > chondritin/glucosamine pills and powders many now take to help control
    > arthritis. Back in Japan, our Japanese Doc recommended I start also eating
    > the shrimp tails and shells. They are simply a natural source of the same
    > thing and the pill form wasnt working as well for me. Also, to use as many
    > bone based deep broths (and not so much the canned type but more of a
    > consomme sort you make at home that gels). Calcium and other bone
    > strengthening things in there, and less salt by far when you make it at
    > home.


    none of that has anything to do with homeopathy:

    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeopathy>

    some homeopathic doctors might recommend such, which keeps them from being
    total quacks. barely.

    your pal,
    blake

  17. #17
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking

    On Mon, 01 Feb 2010 12:11:45 -0500, Boron Elgar wrote:

    > On Mon, 1 Feb 2010 12:01:46 -0500, "cshenk" <csh[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>"Boron Elgar" wrote
    >>ImStillMags wrote:
    >>
    >>>>Ever heard of homeopathy? The same applies for homeopathic medicine,
    >>>>use only the glass dropper, never touch the medicine
    >>>>with the hands, it changes the chemistry and energy of the medicine.
    >>>
    >>> Homeopathy is a crock of ****....something else one should keep one's
    >>> hands out of.

    >>
    >>Much of it is but not all of it. It's based on observation, just like plant
    >>medicines.

    >
    > No, really. All of it is. It has no basis whatsoever. It is quackery.
    >>
    >>The terminology used in asian healing by 'eating the right food' comes off
    >>as quackery but some of it is based in solidly testable results. Like the
    >>chondritin/glucosamine pills and powders many now take to help control
    >>arthritis. Back in Japan, our Japanese Doc recommended I start also eating
    >>the shrimp tails and shells. They are simply a natural source of the same
    >>thing and the pill form wasnt working as well for me. Also, to use as many
    >>bone based deep broths (and not so much the canned type but more of a
    >>consomme sort you make at home that gels). Calcium and other bone
    >>strengthening things in there, and less salt by far when you make it at
    >>home.

    >
    > I did not say make any argument about what you mention above.
    >>
    >>Apparently I work better with food sourced calcium, iron, and joint based
    >>things. That is *not* unusual and totally harmless.

    >
    > That has nothing to do with homeopathy.
    >>
    >>He's also the one that did the salt tolerance-reactive study which Don and I
    >>were part of. I'm not sodium reactive in blood pressure, Don is if he goes
    >>over 2,000mg a day but at 2,000mg a day or less, he has no changes. Doc
    >>recommended we aim for 1,500mg a day for him after the study but that leaves
    >>a little leeway for an unaccounted for 'snack'. Basically I seemed to have
    >>pretty much a Japanese native salt tolerance while Don is more the 'needs to
    >>keep an eye on it'.

    >
    > That is not homeopathy.
    >>
    >>It isnt uncommon in Asia to find the Doctor is also well schooled in
    >>nutrition, unlike most of what I have encountered in the USA. If their
    >>methods are a little different because they tell you to eat more liver and
    >>fresh leafy greens vice prescribe iron pills, it's harmless.

    >
    > But that is not homeopathy.
    >
    >> And no, they
    >>won't tell you silly things like not mixing live veggies with your hands ;-)
    >>They will tell you to eat a wider variety of fresh foods and not live off
    >>boxed 'American crap' like hamburger helper.

    >
    > And I have not criticized healthy eating, but I reiterate my utter
    > disdain for homeopathy.


    homeopathic doctors are the people chiropractors snicker at.

    your pal,
    blake

  18. #18
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking

    On Mon, 1 Feb 2010 08:34:46 -0800, Steve B wrote:
    >
    > reply: I, personally, have been investigating the practices of sacrificing
    > chickens, moon watching, a reverse osmotic electrolysis food crisper,
    > magnetic butter dishes, and psychokinetic blending of pancake mix. So far,
    > the results are pretty amazing, and I do hope my source of happy mushrooms
    > does not dry up or get apprehended.
    >
    > Steve


    Your ideas are intriguing to me and I wish to subscribe to your newsletter.

    your pal,
    homer

  19. #19
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking

    On Mon, 1 Feb 2010 08:57:39 -0800 (PST), maxine in ri wrote:

    > On Feb 1, 10:31*am, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    >> Mark Thorson wrote:
    >>> I have the TV on most of the day, even though I'm not
    >>> watching most of the time. *I'm usually working, and
    >>> just have the TV as sort of background music. *And
    >>> of course, I like cooking shows. *If Lidia Bastianich
    >>> had a 24 hour channel, that's what would be on my set
    >>> most of the time.

    >>
    >>> Sometimes I get desperate. *Sometimes I'll tune in the
    >>> Spanish-language cooking shows from V-me. *Or an
    >>> infomercial for the Magic Bullet. *(I'd rather have
    >>> an infomercial with Ron Popeil in it -- where are
    >>> you, Ron?)

    >>
    >>> Rarely, I'll tune in to Cooking Time, the Korean
    >>> language cooking show. *The host often uses obscure
    >>> or weird ingrediants, like oligosaccharide or
    >>> slim eel fish paste. *But what really gets me is
    >>> the food quackery. *She'll say this is food is good
    >>> for the joints, or that food is good for the muscles,
    >>> or this other stuff is good for your brain.

    >>
    >>> Yesterday, she was saying that because the salad
    >>> she was making was made with raw vegetables which
    >>> are still alive and have their life force, you
    >>> shouldn't mix the salad dressing into the salad
    >>> with your hands. *You should use chopsticks.
    >>> If the vegetables had been cooked, you could go
    >>> ahead and use your hands. *She wasn't clear on
    >>> whether the life force from your hands would
    >>> ruin the salad, or whether there was some ill
    >>> effect you'd receive from the salad through your
    >>> hands.

    >>
    >>> You learn something about other cultures by
    >>> watching their TV. *Koreans are a bit kooky.

    >>
    >> I dunno that the first things are quackery. *The last part seems
    >> most dubious to me though.

    >
    > Sounds like folk medicine or animism to me. I would bet it goes back
    > to when folks would get sick if the uncooked veggies were handled by
    > hand, but not cooked ones.
    >
    > maxine in ri


    animism or pantheism, sure. it colors your outlook on everything.

    your pal,
    blake

  20. #20
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Quackery In Cooking

    On Mon, 01 Feb 2010 07:16:25 -0800, Mark Thorson wrote:

    > I have the TV on most of the day, even though I'm not
    > watching most of the time. I'm usually working, and
    > just have the TV as sort of background music. And
    > of course, I like cooking shows. If Lidia Bastianich
    > had a 24 hour channel, that's what would be on my set
    > most of the time.
    >
    > Sometimes I get desperate. Sometimes I'll tune in the
    > Spanish-language cooking shows from V-me. Or an
    > infomercial for the Magic Bullet. (I'd rather have
    > an infomercial with Ron Popeil in it -- where are
    > you, Ron?)


    wait - they got infomercials for the magic bullet now?

    <http://www.lovehoney.co.uk/product.cfm?p=8258>

    not sure i want to see ron popeil doing the demo, though.

    your pal,
    blake

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