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Thread: Puerto Rican Pique

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Puerto Rican Pique

    I know every cook likely has his / her own version of Pique, but I was
    wondering about the following terms, if there is much difference
    between them or if most of them are synonyms.


    Pique criollo
    Pique boricua
    Pique boricua de botella
    Pique Puertorriqueño
    Pique verde boricua (presumably same as Pique boricua but made with
    green chiles?)

    (I have also seen, in searching rec.food.cooking, one person refer to
    it as "curtido" http://groups.google.com/groups?sour...y+lady+curtido,
    presumably in the sense of something being pickled, but of course very
    different from all other "curtidos" made in Nicaragua, El Salvador,
    Honduras, etc. I wasn't able to find anyone else on the web referring
    to pique as curtido.)


    Many thanks

    Bill

  2. #2
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: Puerto Rican Pique

    On Jan 9, 5:12*am, wlining...@gmail.com wrote:
    > I know every cook likely has his / her own version of Pique, but I was
    > wondering about the following terms, if there is much difference
    > between them or if most of them are synonyms.
    >
    > Pique criollo
    > Pique boricua
    > Pique boricua de botella
    > Pique Puertorriqueño
    > Pique verde boricua (presumably same as Pique boricua but made with
    > green chiles?)
    >
    > (I have also seen, in searching rec.food.cooking, one person refer to
    > it as "curtido"http://groups.google.com/groups?sourceid=mozclient&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&...,
    > presumably in the sense of something being pickled, but of course very
    > different from all other "curtidos" made in Nicaragua, El Salvador,
    > Honduras, etc. I wasn't able to find anyone else on the web referring
    > to pique as curtido.)
    >
    > Many thanks
    >
    > Bill


    What is/are pique and curtido?
    Lynn in Fargo
    Mi espanol is no so bueno, muchas gracias.

  3. #3
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Puerto Rican Pique

    On Fri, 9 Jan 2009 15:44:39 -0800 (PST), Lynn from Fargo wrote:

    > On Jan 9, 5:12*am, wlining...@gmail.com wrote:
    >> I know every cook likely has his / her own version of Pique, but I was
    >> wondering about the following terms, if there is much difference
    >> between them or if most of them are synonyms.
    >>
    >> Pique criollo
    >> Pique boricua
    >> Pique boricua de botella
    >> Pique Puertorriqueño
    >> Pique verde boricua (presumably same as Pique boricua but made with
    >> green chiles?)
    >>
    >> (I have also seen, in searching rec.food.cooking, one person refer to
    >> it as "curtido"http://groups.google.com/groups?sourceid=mozclient&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&...,
    >> presumably in the sense of something being pickled, but of course very
    >> different from all other "curtidos" made in Nicaragua, El Salvador,
    >> Honduras, etc. I wasn't able to find anyone else on the web referring
    >> to pique as curtido.)
    >>
    >> Many thanks
    >>
    >> Bill

    >
    > What is/are pique and curtido?
    > Lynn in Fargo
    > Mi espanol is no so bueno, muchas gracias.


    evidently, 'pique' is vinegar that has been stored with hot peppers in it.
    the vinegar itself is used as a flavoring.

    <http://www.elcolmadito.com/USPiqueDetail.asp?OrderNumber=1299>

    on 'curtido, wikipedia sez:

    Curtido (pronounced coor-tee-tho) is a type of relish. In Salvadoran
    cuisine, it resembles sauerkraut and is usually made with pickled cabbage,
    onions, carrots, and sometimes lemon juice. It is commonly served alongside
    pupusas, the national delicacy. In Mexican cuisine, curtido consists mainly
    of pickled carrots mixed with onions and chile peppers (usually jalapeño).
    It is used to accompany virtually any dish and is commonly found at
    numerous taquerías.

    i have seen curtido in jars at the grocery store, and would be interested
    to know if anyone has tried it.

    your pal,
    blake



  4. #4
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: Puerto Rican Pique

    On Jan 10, 10:47*am, blake murphy <blakepmNOTT...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Fri, 9 Jan 2009 15:44:39 -0800 (PST), Lynn from Fargo wrote:
    > > On Jan 9, 5:12*am, wlining...@gmail.com wrote:
    > >> I know every cook likely has his / her own version of Pique, but I was
    > >> wondering about the following terms, if there is much difference
    > >> between them or if most of them are synonyms.

    >
    > >> Pique criollo
    > >> Pique boricua
    > >> Pique boricua de botella
    > >> Pique Puertorriqueño
    > >> Pique verde boricua (presumably same as Pique boricua but made with
    > >> green chiles?)

    >
    > >> (I have also seen, in searching rec.food.cooking, one person refer to
    > >> it as "curtido"http://groups.google.com/groups?sourceid=mozclient&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&...,
    > >> presumably in the sense of something being pickled, but of course very
    > >> different from all other "curtidos" made in Nicaragua, El Salvador,
    > >> Honduras, etc. I wasn't able to find anyone else on the web referring
    > >> to pique as curtido.)

    >
    > >> Many thanks

    >
    > >> Bill

    >
    > > What is/are *pique and curtido?
    > > Lynn in Fargo
    > > Mi espanol is no so bueno, muchas gracias.

    >
    > evidently, 'pique' is vinegar that has been stored with hot peppers in it..
    > the vinegar itself is used as a flavoring.
    >
    > <http://www.elcolmadito.com/USPiqueDetail.asp?OrderNumber=1299>
    >
    > on 'curtido, wikipedia sez:
    >
    > Curtido (pronounced coor-tee-tho) is a type of relish. In Salvadoran
    > cuisine, it resembles sauerkraut and is usually made with pickled cabbage,
    > onions, carrots, and sometimes lemon juice. It is commonly served alongside
    > pupusas, the national delicacy. In Mexican cuisine, curtido consists mainly
    > of pickled carrots mixed with onions and chile peppers (usually jalapeño).
    > It is used to accompany virtually any dish and is commonly found at
    > numerous taquerías.
    >
    > i have seen curtido in jars at the grocery store, and would be interested
    > to know if anyone has tried it.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    Aha! Salvadorian Kim Chi.
    Lynn in Fargo
    "One man's ravioli is another man's kreplach, or wonton, or gyoza,
    or . . . "

  5. #5
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Puerto Rican Pique

    On Sat, 10 Jan 2009 11:50:28 -0800 (PST), Lynn from Fargo wrote:

    > On Jan 10, 10:47*am, blake murphy <blakepmNOTT...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >> On Fri, 9 Jan 2009 15:44:39 -0800 (PST), Lynn from Fargo wrote:
    >>> On Jan 9, 5:12*am, wlining...@gmail.com wrote:
    >>>> I know every cook likely has his / her own version of Pique, but I was
    >>>> wondering about the following terms, if there is much difference
    >>>> between them or if most of them are synonyms.

    >>
    >>>> Pique criollo
    >>>> Pique boricua
    >>>> Pique boricua de botella
    >>>> Pique Puertorriqueño
    >>>> Pique verde boricua (presumably same as Pique boricua but made with
    >>>> green chiles?)

    >>
    >>>> (I have also seen, in searching rec.food.cooking, one person refer to
    >>>> it as "curtido"http://groups.google.com/groups?sourceid=mozclient&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&...,
    >>>> presumably in the sense of something being pickled, but of course very
    >>>> different from all other "curtidos" made in Nicaragua, El Salvador,
    >>>> Honduras, etc. I wasn't able to find anyone else on the web referring
    >>>> to pique as curtido.)

    >>
    >>>> Many thanks

    >>
    >>>> Bill

    >>
    >>> What is/are *pique and curtido?
    >>> Lynn in Fargo
    >>> Mi espanol is no so bueno, muchas gracias.

    >>
    >> evidently, 'pique' is vinegar that has been stored with hot peppers in it.
    >> the vinegar itself is used as a flavoring.
    >>
    >> <http://www.elcolmadito.com/USPiqueDetail.asp?OrderNumber=1299>
    >>
    >> on 'curtido, wikipedia sez:
    >>
    >> Curtido (pronounced coor-tee-tho) is a type of relish. In Salvadoran
    >> cuisine, it resembles sauerkraut and is usually made with pickled cabbage,
    >> onions, carrots, and sometimes lemon juice. It is commonly served alongside
    >> pupusas, the national delicacy. In Mexican cuisine, curtido consists mainly
    >> of pickled carrots mixed with onions and chile peppers (usually jalapeño).
    >> It is used to accompany virtually any dish and is commonly found at
    >> numerous taquerías.
    >>
    >> i have seen curtido in jars at the grocery store, and would be interested
    >> to know if anyone has tried it.
    >>
    >> your pal,
    >> blake

    >
    > Aha! Salvadorian Kim Chi.
    > Lynn in Fargo
    > "One man's ravioli is another man's kreplach, or wonton, or gyoza,
    > or . . . "


    i don't think it's nearly as pungent, more like a cabbage slaw or mild
    sauerkraut.

    your pal,
    blake

  6. #6
    sueb Guest

    Default Re: Puerto Rican Pique

    On Jan 10, 8:47*am, blake murphy <blakepmNOTT...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Fri, 9 Jan 2009 15:44:39 -0800 (PST), Lynn from Fargo wrote:
    > > On Jan 9, 5:12*am, wlining...@gmail.com wrote:
    > >> I know every cook likely has his / her own version of Pique, but I was
    > >> wondering about the following terms, if there is much difference
    > >> between them or if most of them are synonyms.

    >
    > >> Pique criollo
    > >> Pique boricua
    > >> Pique boricua de botella
    > >> Pique Puertorriqueño
    > >> Pique verde boricua (presumably same as Pique boricua but made with
    > >> green chiles?)

    >
    > >> (I have also seen, in searching rec.food.cooking, one person refer to
    > >> it as "curtido"http://groups.google.com/groups?sourceid=mozclient&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&...,
    > >> presumably in the sense of something being pickled, but of course very
    > >> different from all other "curtidos" made in Nicaragua, El Salvador,
    > >> Honduras, etc. I wasn't able to find anyone else on the web referring
    > >> to pique as curtido.)

    >
    > >> Many thanks

    >
    > >> Bill

    >
    > > What is/are *pique and curtido?
    > > Lynn in Fargo
    > > Mi espanol is no so bueno, muchas gracias.

    >
    > evidently, 'pique' is vinegar that has been stored with hot peppers in it..
    > the vinegar itself is used as a flavoring.
    >
    > <http://www.elcolmadito.com/USPiqueDetail.asp?OrderNumber=1299>
    >
    > on 'curtido, wikipedia sez:
    >
    > Curtido (pronounced coor-tee-tho) is a type of relish. In Salvadoran
    > cuisine, it resembles sauerkraut and is usually made with pickled cabbage,
    > onions, carrots, and sometimes lemon juice. It is commonly served alongside
    > pupusas, the national delicacy. In Mexican cuisine, curtido consists mainly
    > of pickled carrots mixed with onions and chile peppers (usually jalapeño).
    > It is used to accompany virtually any dish and is commonly found at
    > numerous taquerías.
    >
    > i have seen curtido in jars at the grocery store, and would be interested
    > to know if anyone has tried it.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    I have not purchased it at the grocery store, but have had it many
    times with pupusas at restaurants. It tastes like a vinegery cole
    slaw. It's really good.

    Susan B.

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