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Thread: pressure cooker greens

  1. #1
    notbob Guest

    Default pressure cooker greens

    I'm doing a cajun dinner tonight. Gonna try Emeril's simple jambalaya
    recipe and serve with greens and cornbread. Also going to try
    pressure cooking greens for the first time.

    I already pressure cooked the smoked pork shanks for meat and juice.
    Came out perfect with an hour in the PC at 15 lbs. Now, need to do
    the greens and add the other stuff when they're cooked. Anyone ever
    PC'd greens? I usually jes let 'em simmer for 2-3 hrs, but at 8K ft
    elev, it'd take all night. Greens are the one thing not listed my PCs
    cook book. Any suggestions. Remember, I'm at eight thousand feet!

    I'm finally starting to really appreciate and use my PC, it being almost a
    necessity at this altitude.
    nb

  2. #2
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    On Sep 15, 2:53*pm, notbob <not...@nothome.com> wrote:
    > I'm doing a cajun dinner tonight. *Gonna try Emeril's simple jambalaya
    > recipe and serve with greens and cornbread. *Also going to try
    > pressure cooking greens for the first time.
    >
    > I already pressure cooked the smoked pork shanks for meat and juice.
    > Came out perfect with an hour in the PC at 15 lbs. *Now, need to do
    > the greens and add the other stuff when they're cooked. *Anyone ever
    > PC'd greens? *I usually jes let 'em simmer for 2-3 hrs, but at 8K ft
    > elev, it'd take all night. *Greens are the one thing not listed my PCs
    > cook book. *Any suggestions. *Remember, I'm at eight thousand feet! *
    >
    > I'm finally starting to really appreciate and use my PC, it being almost a
    > necessity at this altitude. *
    > nb


    I'd go about 20-30 minutes.....cook quick and you're done.

  3. #3
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    On Sep 15, 3:46*pm, ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > I'd go about 20-30 minutes.....cook quick and you're done.




    check that....on second thought, it may not take as long ....cut the
    time down to 15 minutes.... depending on what kind of greens you are
    doing. If you are doing 'tender' greens they only take 5 minutes or
    so......collards will need longer.


  4. #4
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    On 2010-09-15, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > cook book. Any suggestions. Remember, I'm at eight thousand feet!


    I let 'em go for 15 mins at 15 lbs. Came out jes right. I then added
    onions, garlic, and partially fried bacon and pan cooked for another
    half hour. Looking good!

    nb

  5. #5
    BubbaBob Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm doing a cajun dinner tonight. Gonna try Emeril's simple jambalaya
    > recipe and serve with greens and cornbread. Also going to try
    > pressure cooking greens for the first time.
    >
    > I already pressure cooked the smoked pork shanks for meat and juice.
    > Came out perfect with an hour in the PC at 15 lbs. Now, need to do
    > the greens and add the other stuff when they're cooked. Anyone ever
    > PC'd greens? I usually jes let 'em simmer for 2-3 hrs, but at 8K ft
    > elev, it'd take all night. Greens are the one thing not listed my PCs
    > cook book. Any suggestions. Remember, I'm at eight thousand feet!
    >
    > I'm finally starting to really appreciate and use my PC, it being
    > almost a necessity at this altitude.
    > nb
    >


    I would never cook greens more than 5 minutes. This sounds like my mother's
    cooking. She'd boil sugar snap peas for a hour.

  6. #6
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    On 2010-09-19, BubbaBob <rnorton47@_remove_this_comcast.net> wrote:

    > I would never cook greens more than 5 minutes.


    Which greens? Five mins for collard greens is like eating rags.
    Turnip, spinach, mustard maybe.

    nb

  7. #7
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    notbob replied to BubbaBob:

    >> I would never cook greens more than 5 minutes.

    >
    > Which greens? Five mins for collard greens is like eating rags.
    > Turnip, spinach, mustard maybe.


    I cook collard greens either very quickly (stir-fried in very hot oil) or
    very slowly (simmered for at least 30 minutes). Chard stems cook about 10
    minutes, chard leaves cook about 2 minutes. Turnip greens and mustard greens
    get pot-steamed for about 10 minutes. I've always cooked kale for a long
    time, but I'm learning that it's not necessary; I've seen many recipes
    recently where the kale is only cooked briefly or not cooked at all. I like
    spinach best when it's barely wilted, i.e., only cooked for about 1-2
    minutes.

    Bob


  8. #8
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    On Sep 19, 6:55*pm, "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz>
    wrote:
    > notbob replied to BubbaBob:
    >
    > >> I would never cook greens more than 5 minutes.

    >
    > > Which greens? *Five mins for collard greens is like eating rags.
    > > Turnip, spinach, mustard maybe.

    >
    > I cook collard greens either very quickly (stir-fried in very hot oil) or
    > very slowly (simmered for at least 30 minutes). Chard stems cook about 10
    > minutes, chard leaves cook about 2 minutes. Turnip greens and mustard greens
    > get pot-steamed for about 10 minutes. I've always cooked kale for a long
    > time, but I'm learning that it's not necessary; I've seen many recipes
    > recently where the kale is only cooked briefly or not cooked at all. I like
    > spinach best when it's barely wilted, i.e., only cooked for about 1-2
    > minutes.
    >
    > Bob


    Yes, different greens need different cooking times.....depending on
    what you are going for. Collards traditionally in the South, get a
    long slow cooking time with salt pork to make them tender and silky.
    They take on a different flavor from slow cooking than they have when
    cooked more quickly.

    None of the nutrition is ever lost because the 'pot likker' is usually
    put over cornbread.


  9. #9
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    On Mon, 20 Sep 2010 07:44:25 -0700, ImStillMags wrote:

    > On Sep 19, 6:55*pm, "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz>


    > None of the nutrition is ever lost because the 'pot likker' is usually
    > put over cornbread.


    Bingo!

    nb

  10. #10
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    On Wed, 22 Sep 2010 13:49:08 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mon, 20 Sep 2010 07:44:25 -0700, ImStillMags wrote:
    >
    >> On Sep 19, 6:55*pm, "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz>

    >
    >> None of the nutrition is ever lost because the 'pot likker' is usually
    >> put over cornbread.

    >
    >Bingo!


    Minerals aren't lost (they don't evaporate) but many vitamins are
    destroyed by heat, especially from the excessive heat generated in
    pressure processors... those things save time (for the lazy bastards)
    but they *cannot* cook and they are the least healthful food prep
    method.

  11. #11
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    On 2010-09-22, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > Minerals aren't lost (they don't evaporate) but many vitamins are
    > destroyed by heat, especially from the excessive heat generated in
    > pressure processors... those things save time (for the lazy bastards)
    > but they *cannot* cook and they are the least healthful food prep
    > method.


    Being no food chemist, I'll not argue. OTOH, I've noticed pressure
    cooking helps retain a lot of flavor, SPECIALLY at 8K ft. For
    instance, when I do a corned beef, it's in LESS water for LESS time,
    so LESS flavor is leached out. I always do tough cuts like brisket,
    hocks, and shanks with as little as water as possible, so as not to
    lose flavor.

    I seldom used my pressure cooker when I lived 100ft above sea level.
    Now, I use it much more often. Used properly, it works more as a
    steamer than a stock pot.

    nb

  12. #12
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    On Wed, 22 Sep 2010 15:09:00 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2010-09-22, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    >> Minerals aren't lost (they don't evaporate) but many vitamins are
    >> destroyed by heat, especially from the excessive heat generated in
    >> pressure processors... those things save time (for the lazy bastards)
    >> but they *cannot* cook and they are the least healthful food prep
    >> method.

    >
    >Being no food chemist, I'll not argue. OTOH, I've noticed pressure
    >cooking helps retain a lot of flavor, SPECIALLY at 8K ft. For
    >instance, when I do a corned beef, it's in LESS water for LESS time,
    >so LESS flavor is leached out. I always do tough cuts like brisket,
    >hocks, and shanks with as little as water as possible, so as not to
    >lose flavor.


    By cooking cured meats in as little water as possible what you're not
    losing is salt.... you've obviously developed a very high affinity for
    heavily salted food... salt is indeed a flavor. Pressure processor is
    the least healthful cooking method possible.

  13. #13
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    On 2010-09-22, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > By cooking cured meats in as little water as possible what you're not
    > losing is salt.... you've obviously developed a very high affinity for
    > heavily salted food... salt is indeed a flavor.


    I'll not deny it.

    > Pressure processor is the least healthful cooking method possible.


    How so?

    nb

  14. #14
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    On Wed, 22 Sep 2010 11:31:26 -0400, Brooklyn1 wrote:

    > On Wed, 22 Sep 2010 15:09:00 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On 2010-09-22, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Minerals aren't lost (they don't evaporate) but many vitamins are
    >>> destroyed by heat, especially from the excessive heat generated in
    >>> pressure processors... those things save time (for the lazy bastards)
    >>> but they *cannot* cook and they are the least healthful food prep
    >>> method.

    >>
    >>Being no food chemist, I'll not argue. OTOH, I've noticed pressure
    >>cooking helps retain a lot of flavor, SPECIALLY at 8K ft. For
    >>instance, when I do a corned beef, it's in LESS water for LESS time,
    >>so LESS flavor is leached out. I always do tough cuts like brisket,
    >>hocks, and shanks with as little as water as possible, so as not to
    >>lose flavor.

    >
    > By cooking cured meats in as little water as possible what you're not
    > losing is salt.... you've obviously developed a very high affinity for
    > heavily salted food... salt is indeed a flavor. Pressure processor is
    > the least healthful cooking method possible.


    do you never tire of spouting complete nonsense?

    blake

  15. #15
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    notbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    >> By cooking cured meats in as little water as possible what you're not
    >> losing is salt.... you've obviously developed a very high affinity for
    >> heavily salted food... salt is indeed a flavor.

    >
    >I'll not deny it.
    >
    >> Pressure processor is the least healthful cooking method possible.

    >
    >How so?


    High temperature destroys vitamins, also fiber... cooking at high
    temperature destroys the flavor of the food and enhances the flavor of
    of minerals/metals. Sodium is a metal.

    The sign of an accomplished cook is one who uses the lowest
    temperatures not the highest.

  16. #16
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    blake murphy wrote:

    >On Wed, 22 Sep 2010 11:31:26 -0400, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    >> On Wed, 22 Sep 2010 15:09:00 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On 2010-09-22, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Minerals aren't lost (they don't evaporate) but many vitamins are
    >>>> destroyed by heat, especially from the excessive heat generated in
    >>>> pressure processors... those things save time (for the lazy bastards)
    >>>> but they *cannot* cook and they are the least healthful food prep
    >>>> method.
    >>>
    >>>Being no food chemist, I'll not argue. OTOH, I've noticed pressure
    >>>cooking helps retain a lot of flavor, SPECIALLY at 8K ft. For
    >>>instance, when I do a corned beef, it's in LESS water for LESS time,
    >>>so LESS flavor is leached out. I always do tough cuts like brisket,
    >>>hocks, and shanks with as little as water as possible, so as not to
    >>>lose flavor.

    >>
    >> By cooking cured meats in as little water as possible what you're not
    >> losing is salt.... you've obviously developed a very high affinity for
    >> heavily salted food... salt is indeed a flavor. Pressure processor is
    >> the least healthful cooking method possible.

    >
    >do you never tire of spouting complete nonsense?
    >
    >blake


    Do you never tire of demonstrating your lack of education... lack of
    legs is the least of the dumb micks liabilities.

  17. #17
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    On 2010-09-22, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > High temperature destroys vitamins, also fiber... cooking at high
    > temperature destroys the flavor of the food and enhances the flavor of
    > of minerals/metals. Sodium is a metal.


    Any referrences you can provide would be appreciated.

    > The sign of an accomplished cook is one who uses the lowest
    > temperatures not the highest.


    C'mon shel! That's jes absurd. Without higher temps, some flavor
    components would not even occur. Carmelization is one example.

    nb

  18. #18
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    In article <g_omo.64164$[email protected]>,
    notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2010-09-22, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    > > Minerals aren't lost (they don't evaporate) but many vitamins are
    > > destroyed by heat, especially from the excessive heat generated in
    > > pressure processors... those things save time (for the lazy bastards)
    > > but they *cannot* cook and they are the least healthful food prep
    > > method.

    >
    > Being no food chemist, I'll not argue. OTOH, I've noticed pressure
    > cooking helps retain a lot of flavor, SPECIALLY at 8K ft. For
    > instance, when I do a corned beef, it's in LESS water for LESS time,
    > so LESS flavor is leached out. I always do tough cuts like brisket,
    > hocks, and shanks with as little as water as possible, so as not to
    > lose flavor.
    >
    > I seldom used my pressure cooker when I lived 100ft above sea level.
    > Now, I use it much more often. Used properly, it works more as a
    > steamer than a stock pot.


    Unlike Sheldon, I don't know absolutely *everything* about *everything*,
    but it seems to me that the shorter cooking time might possibly offset
    the higher temperature as far as how many vitamins get destroyed in the
    cooking process. Also, note that sometimes uncooked foods have some of
    the nutrients locked up inside the indigestible parts, and the cooking
    actually releases nutrients so the body can access them.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  19. #19
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    On Wed, 22 Sep 2010 16:26:09 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2010-09-22, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    >> High temperature destroys vitamins, also fiber... cooking at high
    >> temperature destroys the flavor of the food and enhances the flavor of
    >> of minerals/metals. Sodium is a metal.

    >
    >Any referrences you can provide would be appreciated.


    You can search <vitamins and heat>, you'll find plenty. Vitamin C and
    many B Vitamins are destroyed by heat. With most foods ordinary
    cooking temperature over ordinary cooking times doesn't totally
    destroy the vitiamins but the excessively high temperatures achieved
    when heating under pressure will pretty much destroy all of certain
    vitamins and also of those that are more heat stable. Also many
    vitamins are water soluable (the higher the temperature the more
    soluable), if you toss the cooking liquid you lose not only the
    dissolved minerals but you lose the vitamins too. People generally
    discard the water from cooking vegetables under pressure. The best
    way to maintain nutrition is to stir fry.

    >> The sign of an accomplished cook is one who uses the lowest
    >> temperatures not the highest.

    >
    >C'mon shel! That's jes absurd. Without higher temps, some flavor
    >components would not even occur. Carmelization is one example.


    Not true... just try to caramelize onions (or any sugary food) with
    high heat..... you'll accomplish carbonizing (burn), not caramelizing.
    The best way to caramelize is to cook low and slow. Meat doesn't
    caramelize (only sugar caramelizes), blackened meat is burnt (carbon),
    meat (and other foods) shouldn't be cooked past brown, not only is it
    TIAD it's a carcinogen.

  20. #20
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: pressure cooker greens

    On 2010-09-22, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > discard the water from cooking vegetables under pressure. The best
    > way to maintain nutrition is to stir fry.


    Does not compute, shel.

    Even at the accepted max press of 15 psi, we're looking at an approx
    temp of 250F, a much lower temp than typical frying, baking,
    stir-frying, grilling, etc.


    > caramelize (only sugar caramelizes)


    diff sugar carmelize at diff temps, from 230-350F.

    > blackened meat is burnt (carbon), meat (and other foods) shouldn't
    > be cooked past brown, not only is it TIAD it's a carcinogen.


    In your opinion!! Carbon IS definitely a flavor component. Don't
    think so? Ask
    CCathy to do a poll. (never mind, I jes did)

    nb

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