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Thread: potato skins galore!

  1. #1
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default potato skins galore!

    Over the Xmas holiday I made several things
    that called for mashed potatoes. I decided that
    from now on instead of peeling potatoes and then
    boiling them and mashing them I am going to do it
    a different way.

    Okay, I know people who say leave the skins on, and
    I would, except that I prefer russets for almost all
    my potato needs and for mashed the skin is too tough.

    Now I love the skin. And when I make baked potatoes,
    that is my favorite part! But I don't like the skins
    in mashed potatoes. I do like thinner-skinned potatoes
    mashed in certain cases and the skin is fine on them, but
    *not* on russets.

    So, from now on I am going to bake the potatoes. Remove
    the insides for mashing and save the skins for another
    purpose.

    I did that over Xmas and it was wonderful. I took the
    skins and filled them with grated cheese and chopped up
    sausage patties (which were leftover from my Egg and Grits
    Casserole). Then I bake them at 350 for about 20 minutes
    and then topped them with salsa and sour cream. Yum!

    It's usually too much trouble to make potato skins but
    this way you can kill two birds with one potato! You
    can get your mashed potato pulp (for whatever purpose)
    and put the skins in the freezer and then pop some into
    the oven for a great snack with almost no work! I am
    so brilliant! ;-)

    Kate
    --
    Kate Connally
    “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.”
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  2. #2
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: potato skins galore!

    On Jan 7, 11:10*am, Kate Connally <conna...@pitt.edu> wrote:
    > Over the Xmas holiday I made several things
    > that called for mashed potatoes. *I decided that
    > from now on instead of peeling potatoes and then
    > boiling them and mashing them I am going to do it
    > a different way.
    >
    > Okay, I know people who say leave the skins on, and
    > I would, except that I prefer russets for almost all
    > my potato needs and for mashed the skin is too tough.
    >
    > Now I love the skin. *And when I make baked potatoes,
    > that is my favorite part! *But I don't like the skins
    > in mashed potatoes. *I do like thinner-skinned potatoes
    > mashed in certain cases and the skin is fine on them, but
    > *not* on russets.
    >
    > So, from now on I am going to bake the potatoes. *Remove
    > the insides for mashing and save the skins for another
    > purpose.
    >
    > I did that over Xmas and it was wonderful. *I took the
    > skins and filled them with grated cheese and chopped up
    > sausage patties (which were leftover from my Egg and Grits
    > Casserole). *Then I bake them at 350 for about 20 minutes
    > and then topped them with salsa and sour cream. *Yum!
    >
    > It's usually too much trouble to make potato skins but
    > this way you can kill two birds with one potato! *You
    > can get your mashed potato pulp (for whatever purpose)
    > and put the skins in the freezer and then pop some into
    > the oven for a great snack with almost no work! *I am
    > so brilliant! *;-)
    >
    > Kate
    > --
    > Kate Connally
    > “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    > Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    > Until you bite their heads off.”
    > What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    > mailto:conna...@pitt.edu


    I prefer Yukon Golds for mashed and reds for everything else. I don't
    think russets have much flavor.

  3. #3
    --Bryan Guest

    Default Re: potato skins galore!

    On Jan 7, 1:33*pm, Chemo the Clown <an...@peak.org> wrote:
    >
    > I prefer Yukon Golds for mashed and reds for everything else. I don't
    > think russets have much flavor.


    I agree, but russet skins are good.

    --Bryan








  4. #4
    Tracy Guest

    Default Re: potato skins galore!



    --Bryan wrote:
    > On Jan 7, 1:33 pm, Chemo the Clown <an...@peak.org> wrote:
    >> I prefer Yukon Golds for mashed and reds for everything else. I don't
    >> think russets have much flavor.

    >
    > I agree, but russet skins are good.
    >
    > --Bryan
    >


    and French fries.

    Tracy

  5. #5
    aem Guest

    Default Re: potato skins galore!

    On Jan 7, 11:10 am, Kate Connally <conna...@pitt.edu> wrote:
    [snip]
    > So, from now on I am going to bake the potatoes. Remove
    > the insides for mashing and save the skins for another
    > purpose.
    >

    Sounds very doable. Do you leave the skins dry or butter/oil them
    before baking? -aem



  6. #6
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Re: potato skins galore!

    aem wrote:
    > On Jan 7, 11:10 am, Kate Connally <conna...@pitt.edu> wrote:
    > [snip]
    >> So, from now on I am going to bake the potatoes. Remove
    >> the insides for mashing and save the skins for another
    >> purpose.
    >>

    > Sounds very doable. Do you leave the skins dry or butter/oil them
    > before baking? -aem


    I always butter the skins when making baked potatoes.

    Kate


    --
    Kate Connally
    “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.”
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  7. #7
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: potato skins galore!

    Kate wrote:

    > Over the Xmas holiday I made several things
    > that called for mashed potatoes. I decided that
    > from now on instead of peeling potatoes and then
    > boiling them and mashing them I am going to do it
    > a different way.
    >
    > Okay, I know people who say leave the skins on, and
    > I would, except that I prefer russets for almost all
    > my potato needs and for mashed the skin is too tough.
    >
    > Now I love the skin. And when I make baked potatoes,
    > that is my favorite part! But I don't like the skins
    > in mashed potatoes. I do like thinner-skinned potatoes
    > mashed in certain cases and the skin is fine on them, but
    > *not* on russets.
    >
    > So, from now on I am going to bake the potatoes. Remove
    > the insides for mashing and save the skins for another
    > purpose.
    >
    > I did that over Xmas and it was wonderful. I took the
    > skins and filled them with grated cheese and chopped up
    > sausage patties (which were leftover from my Egg and Grits
    > Casserole). Then I bake them at 350 for about 20 minutes
    > and then topped them with salsa and sour cream. Yum!
    >
    > It's usually too much trouble to make potato skins but
    > this way you can kill two birds with one potato! You
    > can get your mashed potato pulp (for whatever purpose)
    > and put the skins in the freezer and then pop some into
    > the oven for a great snack with almost no work! I am
    > so brilliant! ;-)


    About a week ago I read about someone's dinner at El Bulli, regarded as
    possibly the best restaurant in the world. One of the courses was a consommé
    made from roasted potato skins with butter-filled ravioli and potato
    gnocchi. (The skin of the ravioli was not pasta; it was a seawater-flavored
    gelatin. I'd guess it would melt in the hot liquid if it sat there for any
    length of time.)

    While I don't see myself replicating that dish, the potato-skin consommé
    sounds like a good idea. It's echoed in the Vegetarian Epicure series, where
    vegetable stock made from potato peels is a kitchen staple.

    Bob

    Bob




  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: potato skins galore!

    On Fri, 8 Jan 2010 22:40:51 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >About a week ago I read about someone's dinner at El Bulli, regarded as
    >possibly the best restaurant in the world. One of the courses was a consommé
    >made from roasted potato skins with butter-filled ravioli and potato
    >gnocchi. (The skin of the ravioli was not pasta; it was a seawater-flavored
    >gelatin. I'd guess it would melt in the hot liquid if it sat there for any
    >length of time.)
    >
    >While I don't see myself replicating that dish, the potato-skin consommé
    >sounds like a good idea. It's echoed in the Vegetarian Epicure series, where
    >vegetable stock made from potato peels is a kitchen staple.
    >
    >Bob


    I've looked at more than one El Buli menu over the years and I'll tell
    you the truth. They suck. There is no way I'll go to all that
    trouble for what sounds like barf to me.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  9. #9
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: potato skins galore!

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 8 Jan 2010 22:40:51 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"


    >>About a week ago I read about someone's dinner at El Bulli, regarded as
    >>possibly the best restaurant in the world. One of the courses was a consommé
    >>made from roasted potato skins with butter-filled ravioli and potato
    >>gnocchi. (The skin of the ravioli was not pasta; it was a seawater-flavored
    >>gelatin. I'd guess it would melt in the hot liquid if it sat there for any
    >>length of time.)
    >>
    >>While I don't see myself replicating that dish, the potato-skin consommé
    >>sounds like a good idea. It's echoed in the Vegetarian Epicure series, where
    >>vegetable stock made from potato peels is a kitchen staple.


    >>Bob


    >I've looked at more than one El Buli menu over the years and I'll tell
    >you the truth. They suck. There is no way I'll go to all that
    >trouble for what sounds like barf to me.


    I really want to go.

    Speaking of things molecular, Orson, a foam-leaning restaurant
    in S.F., had a Caesar salad with dressing formed into liquid balls
    that rolled around like mercury -- I guess they had surface tension.
    They were hard to keep on a fork or romaine leaf, but once in your
    mouth they would explode in a burst of anchovy flavor. Quite nice.


    Steve

  10. #10
    Mort Guest

    Default Re: potato skins galore!

    Steve Pope wrote:


    > Speaking of things molecular, Orson, a foam-leaning restaurant
    > in S.F., had a Caesar salad with dressing formed into liquid balls
    > that rolled around like mercury -- I guess they had surface tension.
    > They were hard to keep on a fork or romaine leaf, but once in your
    > mouth they would explode in a burst of anchovy flavor. Quite nice.


    If you want to see the ins and outs of how they do
    that check out "The Fat Duck Cookbook".

    It's a hoot if nothing else.

    --
    Mort

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: potato skins galore!

    On Sat, 9 Jan 2010 07:36:53 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve
    Pope) wrote:

    >sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Fri, 8 Jan 2010 22:40:51 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"

    >
    >>>About a week ago I read about someone's dinner at El Bulli, regarded as
    >>>possibly the best restaurant in the world. One of the courses was a consommé
    >>>made from roasted potato skins with butter-filled ravioli and potato
    >>>gnocchi. (The skin of the ravioli was not pasta; it was a seawater-flavored
    >>>gelatin. I'd guess it would melt in the hot liquid if it sat there for any
    >>>length of time.)
    >>>
    >>>While I don't see myself replicating that dish, the potato-skin consommé
    >>>sounds like a good idea. It's echoed in the Vegetarian Epicure series, where
    >>>vegetable stock made from potato peels is a kitchen staple.

    >
    >>>Bob

    >
    >>I've looked at more than one El Buli menu over the years and I'll tell
    >>you the truth. They suck. There is no way I'll go to all that
    >>trouble for what sounds like barf to me.

    >
    >I really want to go.
    >
    >Speaking of things molecular, Orson, a foam-leaning restaurant
    >in S.F., had a Caesar salad with dressing formed into liquid balls
    >that rolled around like mercury -- I guess they had surface tension.
    >They were hard to keep on a fork or romaine leaf, but once in your
    >mouth they would explode in a burst of anchovy flavor. Quite nice.
    >

    Eeeew. Haven't heard of "Orson" and <thank gawd> have never
    encountered "foam".

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

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