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Thread: pot-au-feu

  1. #1
    sf Guest

    Default pot-au-feu


    The recipes I'm finding call for rump, shank and marrow bone.... but I
    was intrigued by what steve said about it including all sorts of
    meats, including sausage.

    Does anyone have a recipe (or method) for pot-au-feu with more variety
    than just hunks of beef?

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  2. #2
    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. Guest

    Default Re: pot-au-feu



    sf wrote:
    > The recipes I'm finding call for rump, shank and marrow bone.... but I
    > was intrigued by what steve said about it including all sorts of
    > meats, including sausage.
    >
    > Does anyone have a recipe (or method) for pot-au-feu with more variety
    > than just hunks of beef?
    >


    From the Larousse Gastronomique:

    "The classical pot au feu is made of beef and chicken, when available
    (or chicken giblets). In certain regions of France, however, it is
    customary to add veal, pork and sometimes mutton as well.

    Tee chicken is sometimes replaced by duck or turkey.

    Whatever meat is used for the dish, the method is the same. It is
    important only to make sure that these various meats are given long
    enough time to cook."

    Variations include pot au feu a l'abigoise, pot au few a la bearnaise
    also called poule a pot au feu and pot au feu a la languedocienne.
    --

    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.
    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: pot-au-feu

    On Sun, 06 Dec 2009 21:16:38 -0800, "Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq."
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >pot au feu


    Joseph, nb and I are in chat now.... please come in and tell me more
    about pot au feu!

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  4. #4
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: pot-au-feu

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The recipes I'm finding call for rump, shank and marrow bone.... but I
    > was intrigued by what steve said about it including all sorts of
    > meats, including sausage.
    >
    > Does anyone have a recipe (or method) for pot-au-feu with more variety
    > than just hunks of beef?


    Pot roast?

    Consider Barbacoa... (beef cheeks). :-d
    I can also get sliced beef knee bones locally and they have LOTS of
    marrow.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  5. #5
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: pot-au-feu


    "sf" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > The recipes I'm finding call for rump, shank and marrow bone.... but I>
    > was intrigued by what steve said about it including all sorts of> meats,
    > including sausage.
    >
    > Does anyone have a recipe (or method) for pot-au-feu with more variety>
    > than just hunks of beef?


    Of course. It's a great French-American family dinner. It's on my blog the
    way I make it, which is a several day project. Ours is from Brittany, so
    the last thimng cooked is a cheesecloth bag full of bread stuffing. You'll
    like that.
    http://www.judithgreenwood.com/think...th-sam-and-me/
    My grandmother and mother had solid fuel stoves and left the huge pot
    cooking continuously, adding a new meat each day, but I cook and
    refrigerate, repeat, repeat, repeat. By the end the broth is incredible.

    It's a narrative style account, sorry about that. Fotos are missing since
    the redesign, but it's darned good pot au feu!



  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: pot-au-feu

    On Mon, 7 Dec 2009 11:43:08 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >http://www.judithgreenwood.com/think...th-sam-and-me/


    thanks, Giusi!

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  7. #7
    garden-variety dick Guest

    Default Re: pot-au-feu

    On Dec 7, 3:57*am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > In article <82voh51a0302qv4qsng4fa97kb5gbk1...@4ax.com>,
    > *sf *<s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > The recipes I'm finding call for rump, shank and marrow bone.... but I
    > > was intrigued by what steve said about it including all sorts of
    > > meats, including sausage. *

    >
    > > Does anyone have a recipe (or method) for pot-au-feu with more variety
    > > than just hunks of beef?

    >
    > Pot roast?
    >


    A pot-au-feu is a french beef stew. Where do you get the 'pot roast'
    idea from? Chunks of beef? Use beef shank.

    > Consider Barbacoa... (beef cheeks). :-d
    > I can also get sliced beef knee bones locally and they have LOTS of
    > marrow.
    > --
    > Peace! Om
    >
    > "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down." *
    > --Steve Rothstein
    >
    > Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    > recfoodreci...@yahoogroups.com
    > Subscribe: recfoodrecipes-subscr...@yahoogroups.com



  8. #8
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: pot-au-feu

    garden-variety dick <[email protected]> wrote:

    >A pot-au-feu is a french beef stew. Where do you get the 'pot roast'
    >idea from?


    Some people use pot roast and stew as almost synonymous terms.

    To me, it's a stew if you serve the whole thing including the
    liquid and vegetables as is out of the pot. It's a pot roast if
    you're serving (at least primarily) the meat ingredient.

    Steve

  9. #9
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: pot-au-feu

    In article <hfji8k$50n$[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote:

    > garden-variety dick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >A pot-au-feu is a french beef stew. Where do you get the 'pot roast'
    > >idea from?

    >
    > Some people use pot roast and stew as almost synonymous terms.
    >
    > To me, it's a stew if you serve the whole thing including the
    > liquid and vegetables as is out of the pot. It's a pot roast if
    > you're serving (at least primarily) the meat ingredient.
    >
    > Steve


    After googling pot-au-feu, it sure looked like pot roast to me. :-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: recfoodrecipes-subscri[email protected]

  10. #10
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: pot-au-feu

    Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote:


    >> garden-variety dick <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> >A pot-au-feu is a french beef stew. Where do you get the 'pot roast'
    >> >idea from?


    >> Some people use pot roast and stew as almost synonymous terms.


    >> To me, it's a stew if you serve the whole thing including the
    >> liquid and vegetables as is out of the pot. It's a pot roast if
    >> you're serving (at least primarily) the meat ingredient.


    >> Steve


    >After googling pot-au-feu, it sure looked like pot roast to me. :-)


    I looked it up in Larousse, and it's more of a stew, if the
    distinction I stated above holds. The definition there
    is pretty broad, but it seems it must contain water, vegetables,
    and more than one type of meat (but other than that, the meat
    ingredients are unspecified). Marrow bones are very typical
    but it was not made clear they're mandatory.

    Pot-au-feu would seem to exclude concepts where the braising liquid
    is either discarded, or transformed into a reduction or sauce.
    The concept is you serve it up straight out of the pot, although
    Larousse seems to suggest picking out the marrow and having
    it on toast is cool.

    Steve



  11. #11
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: pot-au-feu

    In article <hfjm32$7ui$[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote:

    > Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > [email protected] (Steve Pope) wrote:

    >
    > >> garden-variety dick <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > >> >A pot-au-feu is a french beef stew. Where do you get the 'pot roast'
    > >> >idea from?

    >
    > >> Some people use pot roast and stew as almost synonymous terms.

    >
    > >> To me, it's a stew if you serve the whole thing including the
    > >> liquid and vegetables as is out of the pot. It's a pot roast if
    > >> you're serving (at least primarily) the meat ingredient.

    >
    > >> Steve

    >
    > >After googling pot-au-feu, it sure looked like pot roast to me. :-)

    >
    > I looked it up in Larousse, and it's more of a stew, if the
    > distinction I stated above holds. The definition there
    > is pretty broad, but it seems it must contain water, vegetables,
    > and more than one type of meat (but other than that, the meat
    > ingredients are unspecified). Marrow bones are very typical
    > but it was not made clear they're mandatory.
    >
    > Pot-au-feu would seem to exclude concepts where the braising liquid
    > is either discarded, or transformed into a reduction or sauce.
    > The concept is you serve it up straight out of the pot, although
    > Larousse seems to suggest picking out the marrow and having
    > it on toast is cool.
    >
    > Steve


    I am rather fond of marrow. <g>
    And that is a good point. I DO remove the meat and veggies from the pot
    roast pot and reduce the liquid into a sauce...

    Let's see [rummages thru the food pic files];
    <http://i50.tinypic.com/21cy29v.jpg>
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  12. #12
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: pot-au-feu

    Steve Pope wrote:

    >> After googling pot-au-feu, it sure looked like pot roast to me. :-)

    >
    > I looked it up in Larousse, and it's more of a stew, if the
    > distinction I stated above holds. The definition there
    > is pretty broad, but it seems it must contain water, vegetables,
    > and more than one type of meat (but other than that, the meat
    > ingredients are unspecified). Marrow bones are very typical
    > but it was not made clear they're mandatory.
    >
    > Pot-au-feu would seem to exclude concepts where the braising liquid
    > is either discarded, or transformed into a reduction or sauce.
    > The concept is you serve it up straight out of the pot, although
    > Larousse seems to suggest picking out the marrow and having
    > it on toast is cool.


    The broth in pot-au-feu is thin, which to my way of thinking means it's not
    a stew. We consumed the broth separately in cups and also used it as a kind
    of jus poured over the meats and vegetables, which had been fished out of
    the pot and presented on a platter.

    We did have marrow bones, but Lin didn't realize that they were supposed to
    be served as part of the meal. (Fortunately, the dog only got ONE of the
    three marrow bones.)

    Bob


  13. #13
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: pot-au-feu


    "Omelet" ha scritto nel messaggio
    (Steve Pope) wrote:
    >> >A pot-au-feu is a french beef stew. Where do you get the 'pot roast'>>
    >> > >idea from?

    >>
    >> Some people use pot roast and stew as almost synonymous terms.
    >>
    >> To me, it's a stew if you serve the whole thing including the>> liquid
    >> and vegetables as is out of the pot. It's a pot roast if >> you're
    >> serving (at least primarily) the meat ingredient.
    >>
    >> Steve

    >
    > After googling pot-au-feu, it sure looked like pot roast to me. :-)


    It is not stew nor pot roast. It's much closer to soup with grand benefits.



  14. #14
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: pot-au-feu

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > The broth in pot-au-feu is thin, which to my way of thinking means
    > it's not
    > a stew. We consumed the broth separately in cups and also used it as a
    > kind
    > of jus poured over the meats and vegetables, which had been fished out of
    > the pot and presented on a platter.
    >
    > We did have marrow bones, but Lin didn't realize that they were
    > supposed to
    > be served as part of the meal. (Fortunately, the dog only got ONE of the
    > three marrow bones.)
    >
    > Bob


    One of my favorite dishes when I grew up was seafood pot-au-feu. My
    mother would make this for my birthday. Some of the ingredients were
    leeks, shrimp, crab, oysters and artichoke hearts. After I grew up, I
    made it a couple of times, but it just wasn't the same.


    Becca

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