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Thread: Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe

  1. #1
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe


    Bacon shortage worldwide 'unavoidable' UK pig group says

    Enjoy all the bacon while you can! Experts are telling consumers to
    expect rising pork prices, since farmers thinned their herds this year
    because of the high cost of feed.

    By Cindy Perman, CNBC.com

    (Updated 4:06 p.m. Eastern) The droughts that ravaged crops across
    North American and Russia have had a huge impact on the food supply,
    livestock and farmers but now it may be time to hit the “panic” button
    – one pig group is predicting a BACON SHORTAGE.

    “A world shortage of pork and bacon next year is now unavoidable,” the
    National Pig Association in the UK said this week.

    The droughts meant less feed to go around and farmers had to take
    drastic measures. One farmer fed his cows candy to survive, while
    others have pared their herds. The NPA warned that he number of
    slaughtered pigs could drop by 10 percent in the second half of next
    year and that could cause the price of pork products to DOUBLE.

    The group is taking the situation so seriously, they have launched a
    “Save Our Bacon” campaign.

    So, what does this mean for bacon lovers in the U.S.?

    “Unfortunately it does seem as though this is an unavoidable event due
    to drought conditions in key pork producing areas,” said Heather
    Lauer, author of the “Bacon Unwrapped” blog and the book “Bacon: A
    Love Story.”

    Twitter was peppered with all sorts of concern about a possible bacon
    crisis. “Our worst fear is coming to pass — global bacon shortage!”
    @allbacon wrote. “Go, scramble the jets! Get me the PM!” @ckk527
    wrote.

    Some of the bacon Twitterati kicked into action mode. “Time to get
    that backyard pig?” @JP_Permaculture asked. And @Agropinion said,
    “Need bigger freezer!”

    “My first reaction to the news was: The Mayans were right. This is how
    it's going down!” Lauer said.

    During this time of potential national crisis, we turned to the
    National Pork Producers Council for guidance and they said — don’t hit
    the panic button just yet.

    U.S. hog farmers have been reducing their herds due to high feed costs
    but the situation isn’t as severe as it is in the UK and other
    European Union nations, where some nations have reduced herds 10
    percent or more.

    “I don’t think we’re too worried about it,” said Dave Warner, a
    spokesman for the NPCC. “We’re seeing a little bit of that [paring
    herds] here but not nearly what you’re seeing there.”

    U.S. hog farmers probably won’t pare their herds more than 3 percent
    in the next 6 to 8 months, which would mean an increase in retail
    prices on bacon and other pork products of about 8 to 10 percent, said
    Steve Meyer, the president of Paragon Economics and a consultant to
    pork industry.

    “Eight to 10 percent isn’t per se a crisis,” Meyer said.

    And, it’s important to draw the line between the two because UK bacon
    is a completely different product than US bacon, he said — it’s more
    like loin there — and the US doesn’t import bacon from other
    countries.

    “A global reduction in supply is almost unavoidable but I don’t think
    we’re going to have lines for bacon the U.S.!” said Meyer, who also
    writes a daily livestock report. “Are we going to have less product in
    the second half of 2013? Yes.”

    Rising meat prices have been a concern to the industry for the last
    five years since the rise of ethanol, which, like feed for livestock,
    comes from corn. The recent drought in the U.S. and Russia piled on to
    that. Meyer said without ethanol as a base strain on the industry, it
    might have weathered the drought better. Though, the drought was even
    a rarity — the last time the U.S. corn belt suffered a drought was
    1988.

    Meyer said the unbelievable attention that the potential shortage has
    received is a testament to America’s sizzling, smokey love affair with
    bacon.

    “I’ve been talking about [rising meat prices] since 2006 but nobody
    would listen until someone said we’re not going to have enough bacon,”
    Meyer said. “If I’d known that I’d have used different words. Don’t
    take away their bacon!”

    To be clear, there isn't necessarily going to be a shortage in the
    U.S., Meyer said, but prices are definitely still a big concern.

    The price of bacon and other pork products hit a record $3.56 a pound
    in 2011 and last month reached $3.53, according to the USDA.

    “I wouldn’t be surprised to see that number go to $3.60 to $3.70 a
    pound,” Meyer said.

    And this is not good news for families who are already grappling with
    unemployment and digging out of the recession.

    “Anytime you drive up retail prices — beef, pork, chicken, turkey,
    eggs, milk … it falls on people with low incomes and fixed incomes,”
    he said. “The people who can’t afford it.”

    Over the summer, the government announced a plan to buy $100 million
    of pork products for schools, the military, etc. It’s a start, but
    Meyer said it’s still probably not enough to make a dent in the
    industry’s problems.

    So, let’s cut to the chase — which presidential candidate would be
    better for bacon?

    Meyer said the industry isn’t favoring either candidate but what
    they’d vote for is less regulation.

    “It’s not a crisis but there will certainly be a reduction in pork
    supplies in 2013 and that means higher prices for consumers,” he said.

    Still, Lauer said, she’s not taking any chances.

    Mulling the reality of a post-apocalyptic, bacon-less Sunday brunch,
    “there is serious potential for a breakdown in our social structure!”
    she quipped. “And who knows what lengths people will go to in order to
    fulfill their basic bacon needs.”

    In an effort to "get ahead of this life-altering event," Brooks
    Reynolds, one of the co-founders of the Blue Ribbon Bacon Festival,
    and other members of the Iowa Bacon Board, traveled to Reykjavik,
    Iceland for the "International Bacon Summit."

    "One of the key resolutions from the Icelandic and Iowa Bacon Boards
    was to build a world with the proverbial pig in every pot, similar to
    Herbert Hoover's 'chicken in every pot' presidential slogan in 1928,"
    Reynolds said. "The first step in accomplishing this lofty goal is to
    encourage bacon lovers to go out and raise their own pigs. If they
    don't have room in their homes for a pig, we recommend building a
    'personal bacon readiness kit' over the next year, which should
    include things like: thick cut, applewood smoked, dry cured,
    Berkshire, etc."

    He's afraid to even think of a possible bacon shortage and what it
    could mean -- social and political unrest, an increased need for swine
    security and a "tidal wave of black market (boar bacon, tofu bacon,
    turkey bacon and beef bacon) bacon hitting the streets," he said.

    And if there were a shortage, what would it mean for the Blue Ribbon
    Bacon Festival?

    "We would most likely need to heighten security and consider using
    identification verification equipment like retinal scans at the door,"
    Reynolds said.

    “Perhaps it’s finally time for our country to address the need for a
    Strategic Bacon Reserve,” Lauer said firmly. “In the meantime, I’m
    going into survival mode and have already started stockpiling. As FEMA
    says, ‘Prepare. Plan. Stay informed.’”

    Well said, Heather. Stay tuned to the Pony blog for all the latest
    bacon and bacon crisis news

  2. #2
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe

    On Tue, 25 Sep 2012 15:14:00 -0600, Janet Bostwick wrote:

    > The group is taking the situation so seriously, they have launched a
    > “Save Our Bacon” campaign.
    >
    > So, what does this mean for bacon lovers in the U.S.?


    More people in St Louis getting murdered over slices of bacon?

    Turkey bacon was on sale BOGO Free this week at H-E-B. They are
    preparing the public to accept lesser products.

    If we would just cut off the exports, there would be plenty of bacon
    for all of us. As it is, we practically have to shove bacon down the
    throats of other countries even though they don't want it.

    -sw

  3. #3
    David Harmon Guest

    Default Re: Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe

    On Tue, 25 Sep 2012 16:43:27 -0500 in rec.food.cooking, Sqwertz
    <[email protected]> wrote,
    >Turkey bacon was on sale BOGO Free this week at H-E-B. They are
    >preparing the public to accept lesser products.


    Turkey bellies cannot be very big. I'm guessing a rasher of turkey
    bacon might be about a quarter of an inch wide and two inches long?

  4. #4
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe

    Sqwertz wrote:

    > If we would just cut off the exports, there would be plenty of bacon
    > for all of us. As it is, we practically have to shove bacon down the
    > throats of other countries even though they don't want it.


    Which countries are importing bacon from the US?
    --
    Firma predefinita



  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe

    On Tue, 25 Sep 2012 15:14:00 -0600, Janet Bostwick
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Bacon shortage worldwide 'unavoidable' UK pig group says
    >
    > Enjoy all the bacon while you can! Experts are telling consumers to
    > expect rising pork prices, since farmers thinned their herds this year
    > because of the high cost of feed.


    The good part is that hogs are raised to maturity faster than cattle,
    so when the feed crisis is over - they can increase the pig population
    again.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  6. #6
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe

    On Sep 25, 4:43*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > On Tue, 25 Sep 2012 15:14:00 -0600, Janet Bostwick wrote:
    > > The group is taking the situation so seriously, they have launched a
    > > Save Our Bacon campaign.

    >
    > > So, what does this mean for bacon lovers in the U.S.?

    >
    > More people in St Louis getting murdered over slices of bacon?
    >
    > Turkey bacon was on sale BOGO Free this week at H-E-B. *They are
    > preparing the public to accept lesser products.


    Turkey bacon belongs next to Eggbeaters, skim milk, and skinless
    chicken breast. Joyless food for those who are far more interested in
    quantity than quality of life. I met my chicken man this morning.
    13.34 pounds of wings w/o the drummie. Soon he expects to have 800
    tips only for me.
    >
    > If we would just cut off the exports, there would be plenty of bacon
    > for all of us. *As it is, we practically have to shove bacon down the
    > throats of other countries even though they don't want it.


    I picked a bunch of cherry tomatoes this morning and snacked on them
    with bacon.
    >
    > -sw


    --Bryan

  7. #7
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe

    ViLco wrote:
    >
    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > > If we would just cut off the exports, there would be plenty of bacon
    > > for all of us. As it is, we practically have to shove bacon down the
    > > throats of other countries even though they don't want it.

    >
    > Which countries are importing bacon from the US?


    Baconia. Used to be a part of the Soviet Union.

    G.

  8. #8
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe

    Bryan wrote:
    >
    > Turkey bacon belongs next to Eggbeaters, skim milk, and skinless
    > chicken breast. Joyless food for those who are far more interested in
    > quantity than quality of life.


    I tried it once and it wasn't so bad. I still prefer real though. I buy a
    package only 1-3 times a year though.

    > I met my chicken man this morning.
    > 13.34 pounds of wings w/o the drummie. Soon he expects to have 800
    > tips only for me.


    You will be in Brian Heaven with 800 tips. heheheh
    Joke: "Keep the tip," said the leper to the hooker.


    > I picked a bunch of cherry tomatoes this morning and snacked on them
    > with bacon.


    Homegrown cherry tomatoes are good in a pinch but the larger varieties have
    a much better flavor.

    G.

  9. #9
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe

    On Wed, 26 Sep 2012 02:11:29 -0700, David Harmon wrote:

    > On Tue, 25 Sep 2012 16:43:27 -0500 in rec.food.cooking, Sqwertz
    > <[email protected]> wrote,
    >>Turkey bacon was on sale BOGO Free this week at H-E-B. They are
    >>preparing the public to accept lesser products.

    >
    > Turkey bellies cannot be very big. I'm guessing a rasher of turkey
    > bacon might be about a quarter of an inch wide and two inches long?


    Bacon is basically pig breast. So turkeys have proportionately larger
    "bacons" than pigs, just no fat in them.

    Turkey bacon can be any part of the turkey (including skin), but it's
    usually thighs and has to have a more descriptive explanation on how
    it's made on the label (chopped, pressed, formed, mutilated, cured,
    smoked, regurgitated, etc..).

    -sw

  10. #10
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe

    On Wed, 26 Sep 2012 13:02:45 +0200, ViLco wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> If we would just cut off the exports, there would be plenty of bacon
    >> for all of us. As it is, we practically have to shove bacon down the
    >> throats of other countries even though they don't want it.

    >
    > Which countries are importing bacon from the US?


    It changes due to political climate. Many countries were/are not
    accepting U.S. pork due to our use of Ractopine in pigs - banned in
    other countries. But I think we've finally strong-armed most of them,
    like China, into accepting our pig meat.

    I doubt we actually export much processed/smoked bacon. But we export
    all cuts of pork, including the bellies. Asians love fatty pork.

    -sw

  11. #11
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe

    Sqwertz <swertz@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > On Wed, 26 Sep 2012 13:02:45 +0200, ViLco wrote:
    >
    >> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >>> If we would just cut off the exports, there would be plenty of bacon
    >>> for all of us. As it is, we practically have to shove bacon down
    >>> the throats of other countries even though they don't want it.

    >>
    >> Which countries are importing bacon from the US?

    >
    > It changes due to political climate. Many countries were/are not
    > accepting U.S. pork due to our use of Ractopine in pigs - banned in
    > other countries. But I think we've finally strong-armed most of them,
    > like China, into accepting our pig meat.


    Relative to poisoning children with bad milk and toxic toys, and killing
    beloved pets worldwide with contaminated pet food, that hardly seems like an
    issue.

    Just sayin'.

    MartyB



  12. #12
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe

    On Wed, 26 Sep 2012 12:02:40 -0500, Nunya Bidnits wrote:

    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Wed, 26 Sep 2012 13:02:45 +0200, ViLco wrote:
    >>
    >>> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> If we would just cut off the exports, there would be plenty of bacon
    >>>> for all of us. As it is, we practically have to shove bacon down
    >>>> the throats of other countries even though they don't want it.
    >>>
    >>> Which countries are importing bacon from the US?

    >>
    >> It changes due to political climate. Many countries were/are not
    >> accepting U.S. pork due to our use of Ractopine in pigs - banned in
    >> other countries. But I think we've finally strong-armed most of them,
    >> like China, into accepting our pig meat.

    >
    > Relative to poisoning children with bad milk and toxic toys, and killing
    > beloved pets worldwide with contaminated pet food, that hardly seems like an
    > issue.


    China is using underground-produced Ractopine in their own pigs (which
    is really pissing off the makers of "genuine" Ractopine). So just
    like melamine in milk and pet foods... just because it's illegal
    doesn't mean they're not doing it.

    Correction: It's "Ractopamine". And it looks like Brazil and Taiwan
    have just caved in and are now importing at least beef treated with
    Ractopamine.

    -sw

  13. #13
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe

    David Harmon wrote:

    > >Turkey bacon was on sale BOGO Free this week at H-E-B. They are
    > >preparing the public to accept lesser products.

    >
    > Turkey bellies cannot be very big. I'm guessing a rasher of turkey
    > bacon might be about a quarter of an inch wide and two inches long?


    Julie? Is that you?

    Read the label. No "bellies" are sacrificed in making turkey bacon.



  14. #14
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe

    Gary wrote:

    > > > As it is, we practically have to shove bacon down the
    > > > throats of other countries even though they don't want it.

    > >
    > > Which countries are importing bacon from the US?

    >
    > Baconia. Used to be a part of the Soviet Union.


    Wrong. Baconia is a small Basque region. You're thinking of
    Bakonistan.



  15. #15
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Pork shortage not so severe in US as Europe

    "George M. Middius" wrote:
    >
    > Gary wrote:
    >
    > > > > As it is, we practically have to shove bacon down the
    > > > > throats of other countries even though they don't want it.
    > > >
    > > > Which countries are importing bacon from the US?

    > >
    > > Baconia. Used to be a part of the Soviet Union.

    >
    > Wrong. Baconia is a small Basque region. You're thinking of
    > Bakonistan.



    sorry. You are correct, sir. I always get those two countries mixed up.

    G.

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