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Thread: Pork roast question

  1. #1
    Nina Guest

    Default Pork roast question

    Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.

    I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. But the
    thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but crispy on the
    outside."

    While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think I've
    made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out right,
    so I'm looking hard for tips. Any help appreciated!

    Nina


  2. #2
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    "Nina" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]..
    > Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >
    > I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    > a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. But the
    > thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but crispy on the
    > outside."
    >
    > While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think I've
    > made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out right,
    > so I'm looking hard for tips. Any help appreciated!
    >
    > Nina
    >

    The trick will be to find a piece of pork without added water and with
    adequate fat. See if you can locate a real butcher who may have some
    non-factory meat. Get a decent sized piece because small ones can dry out.
    Make sure it has a nice layer of fat surrounding it, if it is available even
    ask for skin to remain on it because that makes crackling, and that it is on
    the bone. If you got skin, score it with a very sharp knife. Rub some dry
    spices all over it and then roast slowly, at a low temperature, as low as
    275F, just until a thermometer shows the internal temp at 160 then remove
    it from the oven and let it sit for 15 minutes.

    What spices? Up to you, but I like rosemary, black pepper and salt or thyme
    to replace the rosemary.



  3. #3
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    "Nina" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:[email protected]..
    > Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >
    > I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    > a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. But the
    > thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but crispy on the
    > outside."
    >
    > While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think I've
    > made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out right,
    > so I'm looking hard for tips. Any help appreciated!
    >
    > Nina
    >

    The trick will be to find a piece of pork without added water and with
    adequate fat. See if you can locate a real butcher who may have some
    non-factory meat. Get a decent sized piece because small ones can dry out.
    Make sure it has a nice layer of fat surrounding it, if it is available even
    ask for skin to remain on it because that makes crackling, and that it is on
    the bone. If you got skin, score it with a very sharp knife. Rub some dry
    spices all over it and then roast slowly, at a low temperature, as low as
    275F, just until a thermometer shows the internal temp at 160 then remove
    it from the oven and let it sit for 15 minutes.

    What spices? Up to you, but I like rosemary, black pepper and salt or thyme
    to replace the rosemary.



  4. #4
    Chile Fiend Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    Nina <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >
    > I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    > a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. But the
    > thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but crispy on the
    > outside."
    >
    > While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think I've
    > made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out right,
    > so I'm looking hard for tips. Any help appreciated!
    >
    > Nina
    >


    Haven't done a full roast for a while but if you can't find a cut with
    decent fat that can always be fixed by affixing a couple strips of bacon
    to the roast with toothpicks. I've actually done this once where I
    started with 4 strips of bacon and then swapped in 2 more in the last 30
    minutes of cooking. Mind you I had the meat on a rack so it wasn't
    swimming in grease.

    It's no substitute for the marbled fat present throughout the meat, but
    it does seem to help keep some moisture in and provides a nice finish on
    the outside.

  5. #5
    Chile Fiend Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    Nina <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >
    > I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    > a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. But the
    > thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but crispy on the
    > outside."
    >
    > While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think I've
    > made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out right,
    > so I'm looking hard for tips. Any help appreciated!
    >
    > Nina
    >


    Haven't done a full roast for a while but if you can't find a cut with
    decent fat that can always be fixed by affixing a couple strips of bacon
    to the roast with toothpicks. I've actually done this once where I
    started with 4 strips of bacon and then swapped in 2 more in the last 30
    minutes of cooking. Mind you I had the meat on a rack so it wasn't
    swimming in grease.

    It's no substitute for the marbled fat present throughout the meat, but
    it does seem to help keep some moisture in and provides a nice finish on
    the outside.

  6. #6
    Nina Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 14:41:38 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >"Nina" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >>
    >> I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    >> a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. But the
    >> thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but crispy on the
    >> outside."
    >>
    >> While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think I've
    >> made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out right,
    >> so I'm looking hard for tips. Any help appreciated!
    >>
    >> Nina
    >>

    >The trick will be to find a piece of pork without added water and with
    >adequate fat. See if you can locate a real butcher who may have some
    >non-factory meat. Get a decent sized piece because small ones can dry out.
    >Make sure it has a nice layer of fat surrounding it, if it is available even
    >ask for skin to remain on it because that makes crackling, and that it is on
    >the bone. If you got skin, score it with a very sharp knife. Rub some dry
    >spices all over it and then roast slowly, at a low temperature, as low as
    >275F, just until a thermometer shows the internal temp at 160 then remove
    >it from the oven and let it sit for 15 minutes.
    >
    >What spices? Up to you, but I like rosemary, black pepper and salt or thyme
    >to replace the rosemary.


    Damn. Real butcher. I was a little exhausted from travel when I was
    shopping last night; I should have thought of that. I found a 7.5 lb.
    bone-in butt roast, which was the fattiest thing I could locate
    (actually about the only thing with any fat on it at all; it is
    getting absurdly hard to find pork that isn't lean). No water added
    though.

    How long do you think per pound at 275?

    I think actually I may freeze this one and have a try at finding a
    real butcher, although I'm in a city I don't know at all well, so this
    may not work.

    I realize I'm investing a lot of magic in one pork roast, but it seems
    to me that if you feel really awful, you should at least have someone
    make you what you really want to eat.

    Thank you for the help!

    Nina



  7. #7
    Nina Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 14:41:38 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >"Nina" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >>
    >> I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    >> a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. But the
    >> thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but crispy on the
    >> outside."
    >>
    >> While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think I've
    >> made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out right,
    >> so I'm looking hard for tips. Any help appreciated!
    >>
    >> Nina
    >>

    >The trick will be to find a piece of pork without added water and with
    >adequate fat. See if you can locate a real butcher who may have some
    >non-factory meat. Get a decent sized piece because small ones can dry out.
    >Make sure it has a nice layer of fat surrounding it, if it is available even
    >ask for skin to remain on it because that makes crackling, and that it is on
    >the bone. If you got skin, score it with a very sharp knife. Rub some dry
    >spices all over it and then roast slowly, at a low temperature, as low as
    >275F, just until a thermometer shows the internal temp at 160 then remove
    >it from the oven and let it sit for 15 minutes.
    >
    >What spices? Up to you, but I like rosemary, black pepper and salt or thyme
    >to replace the rosemary.


    Damn. Real butcher. I was a little exhausted from travel when I was
    shopping last night; I should have thought of that. I found a 7.5 lb.
    bone-in butt roast, which was the fattiest thing I could locate
    (actually about the only thing with any fat on it at all; it is
    getting absurdly hard to find pork that isn't lean). No water added
    though.

    How long do you think per pound at 275?

    I think actually I may freeze this one and have a try at finding a
    real butcher, although I'm in a city I don't know at all well, so this
    may not work.

    I realize I'm investing a lot of magic in one pork roast, but it seems
    to me that if you feel really awful, you should at least have someone
    make you what you really want to eat.

    Thank you for the help!

    Nina



  8. #8
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    "Nina" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>"Nina"


    as low as
    >>275F, just until a thermometer shows the internal temp at 160 then remove
    >>it from the oven and let it sit for 15 minutes.


    > Damn. Real butcher.


    Ask neighbors and at a local gourmet shop if there is one. I don't think
    butt will provide what you asked for, but you could do Kili's kahlua pig!

    ..> How long do you think per pound at 275?
    >

    I don't know, maybe 30 mins? I always go by thermometer. It's too easy to
    get cocky with minutes and wander off and forget to check.

    > I think actually I may freeze this one and have a try at finding a
    > real butcher, although I'm in a city I don't know at all well, so this
    > may not work.
    >

    Ask. Asl everyone. I've met a lot of people in lots of places that way.

    > I realize I'm investing a lot of magic in one pork roast, but it seems
    > to me that if you feel really awful, you should at least have someone
    > make you what you really want to eat.


    True, but don't be hurt if she can't actually eat a lot of it. You can
    always wrap and freeze portions for future meals when she may have more
    appetite. But I agree with fixing what a person thinks will do it for them.



  9. #9
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    "Nina" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>"Nina"


    as low as
    >>275F, just until a thermometer shows the internal temp at 160 then remove
    >>it from the oven and let it sit for 15 minutes.


    > Damn. Real butcher.


    Ask neighbors and at a local gourmet shop if there is one. I don't think
    butt will provide what you asked for, but you could do Kili's kahlua pig!

    ..> How long do you think per pound at 275?
    >

    I don't know, maybe 30 mins? I always go by thermometer. It's too easy to
    get cocky with minutes and wander off and forget to check.

    > I think actually I may freeze this one and have a try at finding a
    > real butcher, although I'm in a city I don't know at all well, so this
    > may not work.
    >

    Ask. Asl everyone. I've met a lot of people in lots of places that way.

    > I realize I'm investing a lot of magic in one pork roast, but it seems
    > to me that if you feel really awful, you should at least have someone
    > make you what you really want to eat.


    True, but don't be hurt if she can't actually eat a lot of it. You can
    always wrap and freeze portions for future meals when she may have more
    appetite. But I agree with fixing what a person thinks will do it for them.



  10. #10
    Virginia Tadrzynski Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question


    "Nina" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 14:41:38 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>"Nina" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >>news:[email protected] ..
    >>> Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >>>
    >>> I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    >>> a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. But the
    >>> thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but crispy on the
    >>> outside."
    >>>
    >>> While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think I've
    >>> made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out right,
    >>> so I'm looking hard for tips. Any help appreciated!
    >>>
    >>> Nina
    >>>

    >>The trick will be to find a piece of pork without added water and with
    >>adequate fat. See if you can locate a real butcher who may have some
    >>non-factory meat. Get a decent sized piece because small ones can dry
    >>out.
    >>Make sure it has a nice layer of fat surrounding it, if it is available
    >>even
    >>ask for skin to remain on it because that makes crackling, and that it is
    >>on
    >>the bone. If you got skin, score it with a very sharp knife. Rub some
    >>dry
    >>spices all over it and then roast slowly, at a low temperature, as low as
    >>275F, just until a thermometer shows the internal temp at 160 then remove
    >>it from the oven and let it sit for 15 minutes.
    >>
    >>What spices? Up to you, but I like rosemary, black pepper and salt or
    >>thyme
    >>to replace the rosemary.

    >
    > Damn. Real butcher. I was a little exhausted from travel when I was
    > shopping last night; I should have thought of that. I found a 7.5 lb.
    > bone-in butt roast, which was the fattiest thing I could locate
    > (actually about the only thing with any fat on it at all; it is
    > getting absurdly hard to find pork that isn't lean). No water added
    > though.
    >
    > How long do you think per pound at 275?
    >
    > I think actually I may freeze this one and have a try at finding a
    > real butcher, although I'm in a city I don't know at all well, so this
    > may not work.
    >
    > I realize I'm investing a lot of magic in one pork roast, but it seems
    > to me that if you feel really awful, you should at least have someone
    > make you what you really want to eat.
    >
    > Thank you for the help!
    >
    > Nina
    >
    >


    Grab the phone book and look up a butcher....ask if he carries porchetta (a
    boneless roast with an outer layer of fat, sometimes skin, they roast up
    lovely cripy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside, just the way
    you want it....explain WHY you want it and he just may give you his personal
    tip for making it the best roast you ever made.
    -ginny



  11. #11
    Virginia Tadrzynski Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question


    "Nina" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 14:41:38 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>"Nina" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >>news:[email protected] ..
    >>> Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >>>
    >>> I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    >>> a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. But the
    >>> thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but crispy on the
    >>> outside."
    >>>
    >>> While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think I've
    >>> made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out right,
    >>> so I'm looking hard for tips. Any help appreciated!
    >>>
    >>> Nina
    >>>

    >>The trick will be to find a piece of pork without added water and with
    >>adequate fat. See if you can locate a real butcher who may have some
    >>non-factory meat. Get a decent sized piece because small ones can dry
    >>out.
    >>Make sure it has a nice layer of fat surrounding it, if it is available
    >>even
    >>ask for skin to remain on it because that makes crackling, and that it is
    >>on
    >>the bone. If you got skin, score it with a very sharp knife. Rub some
    >>dry
    >>spices all over it and then roast slowly, at a low temperature, as low as
    >>275F, just until a thermometer shows the internal temp at 160 then remove
    >>it from the oven and let it sit for 15 minutes.
    >>
    >>What spices? Up to you, but I like rosemary, black pepper and salt or
    >>thyme
    >>to replace the rosemary.

    >
    > Damn. Real butcher. I was a little exhausted from travel when I was
    > shopping last night; I should have thought of that. I found a 7.5 lb.
    > bone-in butt roast, which was the fattiest thing I could locate
    > (actually about the only thing with any fat on it at all; it is
    > getting absurdly hard to find pork that isn't lean). No water added
    > though.
    >
    > How long do you think per pound at 275?
    >
    > I think actually I may freeze this one and have a try at finding a
    > real butcher, although I'm in a city I don't know at all well, so this
    > may not work.
    >
    > I realize I'm investing a lot of magic in one pork roast, but it seems
    > to me that if you feel really awful, you should at least have someone
    > make you what you really want to eat.
    >
    > Thank you for the help!
    >
    > Nina
    >
    >


    Grab the phone book and look up a butcher....ask if he carries porchetta (a
    boneless roast with an outer layer of fat, sometimes skin, they roast up
    lovely cripy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside, just the way
    you want it....explain WHY you want it and he just may give you his personal
    tip for making it the best roast you ever made.
    -ginny



  12. #12
    kilikini Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    Nina wrote:
    > On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 14:41:38 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> "Nina" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >>>
    >>> I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going
    >>> through a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue.
    >>> But the thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but
    >>> crispy on the outside."
    >>>
    >>> While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think
    >>> I've made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out
    >>> right, so I'm looking hard for tips. Any help appreciated!
    >>>
    >>> Nina
    >>>

    >> The trick will be to find a piece of pork without added water and
    >> with adequate fat. See if you can locate a real butcher who may
    >> have some non-factory meat. Get a decent sized piece because small
    >> ones can dry out. Make sure it has a nice layer of fat surrounding
    >> it, if it is available even ask for skin to remain on it because
    >> that makes crackling, and that it is on the bone. If you got skin,
    >> score it with a very sharp knife. Rub some dry spices all over it
    >> and then roast slowly, at a low temperature, as low as 275F, just
    >> until a thermometer shows the internal temp at 160 then remove it
    >> from the oven and let it sit for 15 minutes.
    >>
    >> What spices? Up to you, but I like rosemary, black pepper and salt
    >> or thyme to replace the rosemary.

    >
    > Damn. Real butcher. I was a little exhausted from travel when I was
    > shopping last night; I should have thought of that. I found a 7.5 lb.
    > bone-in butt roast, which was the fattiest thing I could locate
    > (actually about the only thing with any fat on it at all; it is
    > getting absurdly hard to find pork that isn't lean). No water added
    > though.
    >
    > How long do you think per pound at 275?
    >
    > I think actually I may freeze this one and have a try at finding a
    > real butcher, although I'm in a city I don't know at all well, so this
    > may not work.
    >
    > I realize I'm investing a lot of magic in one pork roast, but it seems
    > to me that if you feel really awful, you should at least have someone
    > make you what you really want to eat.
    >
    > Thank you for the help!
    >
    > Nina


    (purposely not snipped)

    I agree with Guisi on the preparation of the pork. Thing is, it's done when
    it's done. Every piece is different. Are you looking to slice the pork or
    to shred the pork? If you want it shredded, the internal temperature needs
    to reach 195 degrees F. If you want to slice it, it doesn't have to go
    quite that high. Do you have a probe or instant-read thermometer?

    We've done some butts and shoulders at the same time and one will be done in
    4 hours and the other will take about 8. (We're usually smoking the pork
    with oak wood in order for the meat to be shreddred, though.)

    In any case, liberally rub the pork with salt, whatever herbs and spices you
    may like, and let it go. Good luck!

    kili



  13. #13
    kilikini Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    Nina wrote:
    > On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 14:41:38 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> "Nina" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >>>
    >>> I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going
    >>> through a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue.
    >>> But the thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but
    >>> crispy on the outside."
    >>>
    >>> While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think
    >>> I've made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out
    >>> right, so I'm looking hard for tips. Any help appreciated!
    >>>
    >>> Nina
    >>>

    >> The trick will be to find a piece of pork without added water and
    >> with adequate fat. See if you can locate a real butcher who may
    >> have some non-factory meat. Get a decent sized piece because small
    >> ones can dry out. Make sure it has a nice layer of fat surrounding
    >> it, if it is available even ask for skin to remain on it because
    >> that makes crackling, and that it is on the bone. If you got skin,
    >> score it with a very sharp knife. Rub some dry spices all over it
    >> and then roast slowly, at a low temperature, as low as 275F, just
    >> until a thermometer shows the internal temp at 160 then remove it
    >> from the oven and let it sit for 15 minutes.
    >>
    >> What spices? Up to you, but I like rosemary, black pepper and salt
    >> or thyme to replace the rosemary.

    >
    > Damn. Real butcher. I was a little exhausted from travel when I was
    > shopping last night; I should have thought of that. I found a 7.5 lb.
    > bone-in butt roast, which was the fattiest thing I could locate
    > (actually about the only thing with any fat on it at all; it is
    > getting absurdly hard to find pork that isn't lean). No water added
    > though.
    >
    > How long do you think per pound at 275?
    >
    > I think actually I may freeze this one and have a try at finding a
    > real butcher, although I'm in a city I don't know at all well, so this
    > may not work.
    >
    > I realize I'm investing a lot of magic in one pork roast, but it seems
    > to me that if you feel really awful, you should at least have someone
    > make you what you really want to eat.
    >
    > Thank you for the help!
    >
    > Nina


    (purposely not snipped)

    I agree with Guisi on the preparation of the pork. Thing is, it's done when
    it's done. Every piece is different. Are you looking to slice the pork or
    to shred the pork? If you want it shredded, the internal temperature needs
    to reach 195 degrees F. If you want to slice it, it doesn't have to go
    quite that high. Do you have a probe or instant-read thermometer?

    We've done some butts and shoulders at the same time and one will be done in
    4 hours and the other will take about 8. (We're usually smoking the pork
    with oak wood in order for the meat to be shreddred, though.)

    In any case, liberally rub the pork with salt, whatever herbs and spices you
    may like, and let it go. Good luck!

    kili



  14. #14
    Steve Y Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    If she wants a crispy outside then you will need to find meat with the
    rind on. Bring it out of fridge and up to room temperature and then dry
    the skin, score it in a criss cross pattern and then rub with salt and
    any spices you like with pork. I would then blast in a hot oven for
    25/30 mins at 210C and then finish off at 170C for 15mins/lb. If you
    don't have a period at a hot temperature you are unlikley to crisp the skin

    Steve

    Nina wrote:
    > Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >
    > I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    > a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. But the
    > thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but crispy on the
    > outside."
    >
    > While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think I've
    > made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out right,
    > so I'm looking hard for tips. Any help appreciated!
    >
    > Nina
    >


  15. #15
    Steve Y Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    If she wants a crispy outside then you will need to find meat with the
    rind on. Bring it out of fridge and up to room temperature and then dry
    the skin, score it in a criss cross pattern and then rub with salt and
    any spices you like with pork. I would then blast in a hot oven for
    25/30 mins at 210C and then finish off at 170C for 15mins/lb. If you
    don't have a period at a hot temperature you are unlikley to crisp the skin

    Steve

    Nina wrote:
    > Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >
    > I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    > a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. But the
    > thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but crispy on the
    > outside."
    >
    > While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think I've
    > made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out right,
    > so I'm looking hard for tips. Any help appreciated!
    >
    > Nina
    >


  16. #16
    George Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:
    > "Nina" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 14:41:38 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Nina" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >>> news:a4af541v2ui2ggq5pjq625lc[email protected]..
    >>>> Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    >>>> a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. But the
    >>>> thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but crispy on the
    >>>> outside."
    >>>>
    >>>> While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think I've
    >>>> made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out right,
    >>>> so I'm looking hard for tips. Any help appreciated!
    >>>>
    >>>> Nina
    >>>>
    >>> The trick will be to find a piece of pork without added water and with
    >>> adequate fat. See if you can locate a real butcher who may have some
    >>> non-factory meat. Get a decent sized piece because small ones can dry
    >>> out.
    >>> Make sure it has a nice layer of fat surrounding it, if it is available
    >>> even
    >>> ask for skin to remain on it because that makes crackling, and that it is
    >>> on
    >>> the bone. If you got skin, score it with a very sharp knife. Rub some
    >>> dry
    >>> spices all over it and then roast slowly, at a low temperature, as low as
    >>> 275F, just until a thermometer shows the internal temp at 160 then remove
    >>> it from the oven and let it sit for 15 minutes.
    >>>
    >>> What spices? Up to you, but I like rosemary, black pepper and salt or
    >>> thyme
    >>> to replace the rosemary.

    >> Damn. Real butcher. I was a little exhausted from travel when I was
    >> shopping last night; I should have thought of that. I found a 7.5 lb.
    >> bone-in butt roast, which was the fattiest thing I could locate
    >> (actually about the only thing with any fat on it at all; it is
    >> getting absurdly hard to find pork that isn't lean). No water added
    >> though.
    >>
    >> How long do you think per pound at 275?
    >>
    >> I think actually I may freeze this one and have a try at finding a
    >> real butcher, although I'm in a city I don't know at all well, so this
    >> may not work.
    >>
    >> I realize I'm investing a lot of magic in one pork roast, but it seems
    >> to me that if you feel really awful, you should at least have someone
    >> make you what you really want to eat.
    >>
    >> Thank you for the help!
    >>
    >> Nina
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Grab the phone book and look up a butcher....ask if he carries porchetta (a
    > boneless roast with an outer layer of fat, sometimes skin, they roast up
    > lovely cripy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside, just the way
    > you want it....explain WHY you want it and he just may give you his personal
    > tip for making it the best roast you ever made.
    > -ginny
    >
    >

    I vote for porketta too. I buy it at the local Italian market where they
    sell real pork. I buy a large one because it is hard to beat a sandwich
    of sliced leftover porketta on a crispy Italian roll the next day.

  17. #17
    George Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    Virginia Tadrzynski wrote:
    > "Nina" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 14:41:38 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Nina" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >>> news:[email protected]..
    >>>> Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    >>>> a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. But the
    >>>> thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but crispy on the
    >>>> outside."
    >>>>
    >>>> While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think I've
    >>>> made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out right,
    >>>> so I'm looking hard for tips. Any help appreciated!
    >>>>
    >>>> Nina
    >>>>
    >>> The trick will be to find a piece of pork without added water and with
    >>> adequate fat. See if you can locate a real butcher who may have some
    >>> non-factory meat. Get a decent sized piece because small ones can dry
    >>> out.
    >>> Make sure it has a nice layer of fat surrounding it, if it is available
    >>> even
    >>> ask for skin to remain on it because that makes crackling, and that it is
    >>> on
    >>> the bone. If you got skin, score it with a very sharp knife. Rub some
    >>> dry
    >>> spices all over it and then roast slowly, at a low temperature, as low as
    >>> 275F, just until a thermometer shows the internal temp at 160 then remove
    >>> it from the oven and let it sit for 15 minutes.
    >>>
    >>> What spices? Up to you, but I like rosemary, black pepper and salt or
    >>> thyme
    >>> to replace the rosemary.

    >> Damn. Real butcher. I was a little exhausted from travel when I was
    >> shopping last night; I should have thought of that. I found a 7.5 lb.
    >> bone-in butt roast, which was the fattiest thing I could locate
    >> (actually about the only thing with any fat on it at all; it is
    >> getting absurdly hard to find pork that isn't lean). No water added
    >> though.
    >>
    >> How long do you think per pound at 275?
    >>
    >> I think actually I may freeze this one and have a try at finding a
    >> real butcher, although I'm in a city I don't know at all well, so this
    >> may not work.
    >>
    >> I realize I'm investing a lot of magic in one pork roast, but it seems
    >> to me that if you feel really awful, you should at least have someone
    >> make you what you really want to eat.
    >>
    >> Thank you for the help!
    >>
    >> Nina
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Grab the phone book and look up a butcher....ask if he carries porchetta (a
    > boneless roast with an outer layer of fat, sometimes skin, they roast up
    > lovely cripy on the outside, tender and juicy on the inside, just the way
    > you want it....explain WHY you want it and he just may give you his personal
    > tip for making it the best roast you ever made.
    > -ginny
    >
    >

    I vote for porketta too. I buy it at the local Italian market where they
    sell real pork. I buy a large one because it is hard to beat a sandwich
    of sliced leftover porketta on a crispy Italian roll the next day.

  18. #18
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    On Jun 17, 5:09*am, Nina <ninaNOS...@economika.net> wrote:
    > Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >
    > I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    > a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. *But the
    > thing that she craves is roast pork... *"very tender but crispy on the
    > outside."
    >
    > While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think I've
    > made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out right,
    > so I'm looking hard for tips. *Any help appreciated!
    >
    > Nina


    I like to make a couple of deep gashes and insert garlic cloves in
    them, and then S & P on the outside. Make sure that there is fat on
    the outside like others have suggested. I also like to peel a couple
    of spuds, boil for about 10 minutes, and then adding them to the
    roast, turning occasionally to brown the outside. Delicious & easy!

  19. #19
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    On Jun 17, 5:09*am, Nina <ninaNOS...@economika.net> wrote:
    > Hey, everyone... I'm just looking for ideas here.
    >
    > I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    > a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. *But the
    > thing that she craves is roast pork... *"very tender but crispy on the
    > outside."
    >
    > While I'm great at souvlaki and pork on the grill, I don't think I've
    > made a pork roast in a decade, and I want this one to come out right,
    > so I'm looking hard for tips. *Any help appreciated!
    >
    > Nina


    I like to make a couple of deep gashes and insert garlic cloves in
    them, and then S & P on the outside. Make sure that there is fat on
    the outside like others have suggested. I also like to peel a couple
    of spuds, boil for about 10 minutes, and then adding them to the
    roast, turning occasionally to brown the outside. Delicious & easy!

  20. #20
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: Pork roast question

    "Nina" wrote

    > I'm at my mother's for a few days, and she is very ill, going through
    > a second round of chemotherapy, so food is really an issue. But the
    > thing that she craves is roast pork... "very tender but crispy on the
    > outside."


    Hi Nina! The first of these 2 is a possible. You may want to shift the
    spices if it seems too spicy or odd to you or your Mom's cookery but the
    method is solid and has the timing you asked Guisi for. The second one is
    just for fun ;-)


    MMMMM----- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.05

    Title: Xxcarol's Pork Roast (with crockpot variation)
    Categories: Xxcarol, Pork, Diabetic, Crockpot
    Yield: 8 Servings

    5 lb Pork Roast (shoulder/butt)
    1 ts Chinese 5 spice
    1 ts Ground ginger
    1 ts Black pepper
    1 ts Salt

    Pre-heat oven to 400 degrees. Sprinkle seasonings all over roast
    (may wish more black pepper, add to taste). Place roast in a roasting
    pan, preferably one with a V shaped rack to hold the roast out of the
    dripping pan.

    Cook for 30 mins at 400 degress, then reduce temperature to 250 and
    cook an additional 6.5 hours. The lower heat takes longer but will
    yield a tender product out of a cheap pork shoulder or other cut. The
    V-shaped rack will cause the fat to drip out, resulting in a reduced
    fat product without losing any of the flavor (thats why the longer
    cooking at the lower temp is needed).

    If you like a highly spiced exterior, you can increase the Chinese 5
    spice, black pepper, and ground ginger to 1 TB.

    Alternative spices version: Omit the Chinese 5 spice and ginger.
    Substitute dry mustard powder and finely grated horseradish (or dry
    wasabi powder used sparingly for the horseradish).

    Alternative cooking version: Roast as above but use no spices other
    than salt. When it is time to reduce the temperature to 250, remove
    from the oven and place in a wide low crockpot (must be able to turn
    the roast over during cooking to keep it coated with the sauce).
    Sauce: 1.5 to 2 cups of either hoisin, char su, or hot-spicy barbacue
    (with 1 TB vinigar added if barbacue). Turn roast to coat. Place
    crockpot on medium if you have that setting, low if no medium. Turn
    every hour for 3 hours then reduce to low setting. When it's falling
    off the bones, it's done. (time will depend on the amount of bone and
    size of cut, usually about 2 more hours). Note, this is one meat that
    will get 'tough' if overcooked. It's better removed at this point,
    eating what you need that night then the leftovers can be rewarmed as
    needed or turned into 'shredded pork' on a bun (or a DimSum filling).

    From the kitchen of: xxcarol From: Carol Shenkenberger Date: 16 Jan
    00 From: Greg Mayman Date: 08-10-00 Cooking

    MMMMM

    MMMMM----- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.05

    Title: Xxcarol's porky butt
    Categories: Xxcarol, Crockpot, Diabetic
    Yield: 12 Servings

    2 lb Pork butt, whole frozen
    1 lb Pork cutlets, frozen
    1/2 ea Head cabbage, torn up bits
    1 lg White onion, chopped big
    10 ea Peeled garlic cloves, whole
    2 ea Cans (16 oz) sliced tomatoes
    1 c Tomato juice
    5 c Water (estimated)
    2 ts Patis (alt 1 TB soy sauce)
    2 ts Sesame oil (alt olive oil)
    1 ts Black pepper
    1 ts Salt

    This is a sort of 'trash cooking for the crockpot' born of a day when
    I wanted to cook but didnt want to stir out of the house. I have
    this extra freezer than could hold a whole hog so I always have
    'stuff' about even if frozen. This time, it was markdown pork bits
    and I clobbered 2 types together to make about 3 lbs of meat.

    I added 1/2 head of cabbage and tore it by hand up to big chunks, then
    sliced a large white onion up in about 8 pieces. Toss in 10 cloves of
    garlic (ours is a bit milder, you may want to use 6 cloves with
    regular USA types) then add the rest. The tomato cans are contadina
    brand. The patis is Tiparos brand (lower sodium than all others I
    have seen). The tomato juice is actually a local vegetable juice,
    close to a can of spicy V-8 so you can use that if you have it handy.

    You will see soy sauce as an alternate to patis and it will work but
    change the dish. Same for the olive oil in place of a good sesame
    oil (highly suggest stick with the sesame oil if you can! Very
    distinctive difference).

    Optional additions: Carrots would be a natural. The tougher woody
    parts of asparagus would work well and cook to soft in the crockpot.
    Mushrooms, dried or fresh would be a nice touch (leave them whole).

    Serving suggestions: With rice at the side or as a bed you place the
    'stew' on. This one cries for fresh fruit at the side, such as
    cantalope or honeydew. Oranges or sliced pears would work. Most
    berry types would be too 'tart' to match well but muskdine 'grapes'
    would be perfect. Deep red wine will match this dish but make it a
    table wine, not a dry one.

    From the Sasebo Japan kitchen of: xxcarol 17MAR2007

    MMMMM




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