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Thread: Of Pork ribs and Hackberry wood...

  1. #1
    Omelet Guest

    Default Of Pork ribs and Hackberry wood...

    Sorry no pics. Maybe next time.
    I was babysitting while cooking Saturday. <g>

    BBQ'd my first ever rack of pork ribs on Saturday. They were on sale for
    $1.59 for an intact rib rack.

    I don't see the point in trimming them. I just put some home made BBQ
    sauce on the rack and BBQ'd it as is, no trimming. All of the meat is
    good and turned out falling off the bone tender!

    I put it on the far end of the pit away from the offset fire box. The
    temp gauge is near the end just to the left of the chimney and it read
    400 degrees for part of the cook as I added wood but most of the cook,
    it hung out right around 325 degrees.

    I also put a bowl of water in the middle of the pit to provide some
    moisture so they would not dry out.

    I was cooking chicken hindquarters too and having to rotate those at 20
    minute intervals (moving some away from the fire box and the ones
    further back closer to it) so I first turned the ribs over after 40
    minutes, then again at 1 hour and 20 minutes. I'd originally planned to
    cook for 3 hours but when I went to turn them a third time right at 2
    hours, my tongs sank into what was obviously well done, tender pork so I
    pulled them off and let them rest for about 30 minutes.

    Oh. My. Gods!

    They were falling apart tender with still just a little "chew" to them
    if you know what I mean. Totally perfect!

    I shared the rack with Sis' for Dyson's Birthday dinner, then let them
    take home 1/2 of what was left. ;-) I've made 3 more meals out of the
    portion I kept.

    I will be doing this again for sure! A lot less hassle than beef ribs
    that have to be tenderized first. Wow.

    The fire was primarily Hackberry since I have so much of it. I tossed
    on a couple of small pieces of mesquite right before I started the cook.
    Hackberry is milder than oak, kinda neutral. Next time I do a rib rack,
    I will try that wood straight and see what happens. I have about 2
    cords of it since I lost all those large shade branches on the Hackberry
    tree in the front yard.

    I also have plenty of post oak that needs to be cut up out back, but I
    already know that that stuff is good for BBQ. :-)

    The sauce I used was a combination of olive and anchovy marinara that I
    made mixed with some ginger root and apple cider vinegar. Interesting
    flavor but I'll likely not bother making it that fancy again. I was
    trying to use up some leftovers and some cheap canned black olives I
    made the mistake of purchasing. They are tough but were about 1/2 the
    price of the other olives.

    You get what you pay for sometimes and I have two more cans to figure
    out what to do with... I may just take them back to the store. They
    really are awful texture-wise but the flavor is ok.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  2. #2
    Nan Guest

    Default Re: Of Pork ribs and Hackberry wood...

    On Jul 12, 1:09*pm, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Sorry no pics. Maybe next time.
    > I was babysitting while cooking Saturday. <g>
    >
    > BBQ'd my first ever rack of pork ribs on Saturday. They were on sale for
    > $1.59 for an intact rib rack.
    >
    > I don't see the point in trimming them. *I just put some home made BBQ
    > sauce on the rack and BBQ'd it as is, no trimming. *All of the meat is
    > good and turned out falling off the bone tender!
    >
    > I put it on the far end of the pit away from the offset fire box. The
    > temp gauge is near the end just to the left of the chimney and it read
    > 400 degrees for part of the cook as I added wood but most of the cook,
    > it hung out right around 325 degrees.
    >
    > I also put a bowl of water in the middle of the pit to provide some
    > moisture so they would not dry out.
    >
    > I was cooking chicken hindquarters too and having to rotate those at 20
    > minute intervals (moving some away from the fire box and the ones
    > further back closer to it) so I first turned the ribs over after 40
    > minutes, then again at 1 hour and 20 minutes. *I'd originally planned to
    > cook for 3 hours but when I went to turn them a third time right at 2
    > hours, my tongs sank into what was obviously well done, tender pork so I
    > pulled them off and let them rest for about 30 minutes.
    >
    > Oh. *My. *Gods!
    >
    > They were falling apart tender with still just a little "chew" to them
    > if you know what I mean. Totally perfect!
    >
    > I shared the rack with Sis' for Dyson's Birthday dinner, then let them
    > take home 1/2 of what was left. ;-) *I've made 3 more meals out of the
    > portion I kept.
    >
    > I will be doing this again for sure! *A lot less hassle than beef ribs
    > that have to be tenderized first. Wow.
    >
    > The fire was primarily Hackberry since I have so much of it. *I tossed
    > on a couple of small pieces of mesquite right before I started the cook.
    > Hackberry is milder than oak, kinda neutral. *Next time I do a rib rack,
    > I will try that wood straight and see what happens. *I have about 2
    > cords of it since I lost all those large shade branches on the Hackberry
    > tree in the front yard.
    >
    > I also have plenty of post oak that needs to be cut up out back, but I
    > already know that that stuff is good for BBQ. :-)
    >
    > The sauce I used was a combination of olive and anchovy marinara that I
    > made mixed with some ginger root and apple cider vinegar. *Interesting
    > flavor but I'll likely not bother making it that fancy again. *I was
    > trying to use up some leftovers and some cheap canned black olives I
    > made the mistake of purchasing. They are tough but were about 1/2 the
    > price of the other olives.
    >
    > You get what you pay for sometimes and I have two more cans to figure
    > out what to do with... *I may just take them back to the store. They
    > really are awful texture-wise but the flavor is ok.
    > --
    > Peace! Om
    >
    > Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    > *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. *--Alex Levine


    We just made the best ribs yet this week, also. Used my normal rub,
    but put it on right before cooking due to forgetting to thaw the ribs.
    Cooked them at 250 with cowboy lump for 2 hours, then wrapped them in
    foil and poured a small can of pineapple juice over them in the foil,
    and cooked 2 hours more. They were sooo good and tender you could
    hardly cut them. Most of them never made it to the party table for our
    dau's 38th bday......the guys wandered in and found DH opening the
    foil and that was it. I had to get insistant that the birthday girl
    at least get a taste of them, and my grandson, 10 who LOOOOOVVEESSS
    ribs, had to fight for his. We've been commissioned to cook them
    again, and more than 2 racks next time. Our pulled pork is just about
    as hard to get to the table with this crew.
    It is so nice to have your work appreciated
    So happy for you that a method and flavorings turned out so well.Nan
    in DE

  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Of Pork ribs and Hackberry wood...

    On Mon, 12 Jul 2010 12:09:56 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > You get what you pay for sometimes and I have two more cans to figure
    > out what to do with... I may just take them back to the store. They
    > really are awful texture-wise but the flavor is ok.


    Take them back. I've never considered any olive tough, so they need
    to know that batch was not right.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  4. #4
    PL Guest

    Default Re: Of Pork ribs and Hackberry wood...

    Omelet <[email protected]> wrote in newsmpomelet-651F97.12095612072010
    @news-wc.giganews.com:

    > I was
    > trying to use up some leftovers and some cheap canned black olives I
    > made the mistake of purchasing. They are tough but were about 1/2 the
    > price of the other olives.
    >
    > You get what you pay for sometimes and I have two more cans to figure
    > out what to do with... I may just take them back to the store. They
    > really are awful texture-wise but the flavor is ok.




    Can you post a pic of the cans of olives?? Where're they from?

    I've never met an olive I didn't like.



    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia

    I didn't fight my way to the top of the food chain to be a vegetarian.

  5. #5
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Of Pork ribs and Hackberry wood...

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Nan <[email protected]> wrote:

    > We just made the best ribs yet this week, also. Used my normal rub,
    > but put it on right before cooking due to forgetting to thaw the ribs.


    I may face that some time when I find them on sale. :-) These were
    fresh, vac packed. I did consider a rub rather than a sauce.
    I have plenty of herb/spices on hand!

    > Cooked them at 250 with cowboy lump for 2 hours, then wrapped them in
    > foil and poured a small can of pineapple juice over them in the foil,
    > and cooked 2 hours more.


    Ooh yum! Pineapple has a tenderizing effect on top of it's flavoring.
    That's one reason I love it for beef kebabs.

    > They were sooo good and tender you could
    > hardly cut them. Most of them never made it to the party table for our
    > dau's 38th bday......the guys wandered in and found DH opening the
    > foil and that was it. I had to get insistant that the birthday girl
    > at least get a taste of them, and my grandson, 10 who LOOOOOVVEESSS
    > ribs, had to fight for his.


    <lol> Next year I need to get the elder nephew to participate in the
    cook!

    > We've been commissioned to cook them
    > again, and more than 2 racks next time. Our pulled pork is just about
    > as hard to get to the table with this crew.


    I've not tried pulled pork yet. It's on my list of things to do.

    > It is so nice to have your work appreciated
    > So happy for you that a method and flavorings turned out so well.Nan
    > in DE


    Thanks much! I use more wood than I do charcoal for BBQ as it's free
    due to dropped tree branches. My yard has post oak, elm, mesquite,
    hackberry, privet and cedar. All but the cedar is useful for BBQ. :-)
    The elms are more hardy and don't drop many branches. Same for the
    privet.

    I had to take down a very old, huge mesquite this year. Great sadness.
    :-( It was a good 30 ft. tall and nearly 24" at the base. Part of it's
    root system rotted out and it was falling over. <sigh>

    The small grove of post oaks out back have been a reliable source of
    annual dropped branches. It'd be a pita if it were not for their
    usefulness in the pit. <g>
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

  6. #6
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Of Pork ribs and Hackberry wood...

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 12 Jul 2010 12:09:56 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > You get what you pay for sometimes and I have two more cans to figure
    > > out what to do with... I may just take them back to the store. They
    > > really are awful texture-wise but the flavor is ok.

    >
    > Take them back. I've never considered any olive tough, so they need
    > to know that batch was not right.


    Probably my best bet. Even the store brand is good! These were terrible.
    But less than 1 dollar per can. It was a new brand I'd never seen
    before.

    I'll settle for store credit as I did not keep the receipt.
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    Only Irish coffee provides in a single glass all four essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar and fat. --Alex Levine

  7. #7
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Of Pork ribs and Hackberry wood...

    In article <[email protected]> ,
    PL <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet <[email protected]> wrote in newsmpomelet-651F97.12095612072010
    > @news-wc.giganews.com:
    >
    > > I was
    > > trying to use up some leftovers and some cheap canned black olives I
    > > made the mistake of purchasing. They are tough but were about 1/2 the
    > > price of the other olives.
    > >
    > > You get what you pay for sometimes and I have two more cans to figure
    > > out what to do with... I may just take them back to the store. They
    > > really are awful texture-wise but the flavor is ok.

    >
    > Can you post a pic of the cans of olives?? Where're they from?
    >
    > I've never met an olive I didn't like.


    No pic at the moment... but the label is red. 6 oz. can of "PampA" brand
    (yes, they capitalized the A at the end of the name) Medium ripe olives.

    Back of the can says "Packed for Transnational foods, inc., Miami, Fl.
    33131"

    www.transnationalfoods.com

    Product of Spain
    RSI 21756/CO
    FCE 08075

    Says:

    "Refrigerate after opening, may contain pits or pit fragments".

    I did not read the entire label prior to purchasing... obviously. <g>

    Like I said, the flavor really is ok. The texture is hard and leaves a
    lot to be desired.

    Worked ok for the BBQ sauce tho' after pureeing with the hand blender.
    ;-) I was originally going to serve them as appetizers until I tried
    them.

    This was a new brand that I'd never seen before. Far cheaper than the
    others including the store brand but I likely won't mess with them again
    unless I plan to puree them.

    My sister is pickier than I am and did not complain about the rib sauce
    but did comment she was trying to place the flavor. She is like mom was
    that way and likes to dissect recipes by flavor. An admirable trait
    imho. :-)

    This recipes was less than traditional! How many people use olives and
    anchovies in BBQ sauce?

    Sis' happily took home the leftovers offered. She'd have passed if she
    found it inedible and I also enjoyed it. She does not hesitate to
    critique my cooking by refusing leftovers. And I'm ok with that.

    The brat likes to tempt me too with her own cooking which is exceptional
    as is the brother in law's. She brought some of her strawberry cake
    over in the form of cupcakes. I kept and ate two of them last night.
    <sigh>

    I think the olives will have their uses, just not in the "eat as they
    are" sense like I normally find canned black olives to be...
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Only Irish *coffee provides in a single glass all four *essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar *and fat. --Alex Levine

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