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Thread: Pork "country style ribs"

  1. #41
    gregz Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Dave Smith" wrote in message news:I6jas.29645$[email protected]..
    >
    > On 01/10/2012 11:07 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >> Dave Smith wrote:
    >>>
    >>> I have not bought country ribs in years. My experience with that cut is
    >>> that it bone, a lot of fat, more fat, and a bit of meat. IMO it is not
    >>> even worth cooking.

    >>
    >> Then you have a lousy butcher or you need new glasses. I find that
    >> country style pork ribs to be very meaty, they contain no more
    >> fat/bone than pork chops. Spare ribs have more waste, a lot more
    >> waste. And very often there are boneless country style pork ribs, I
    >> prefer those. Anyway most pork cuts are fatty... bacon is almost all
    >> fat and yet people buy it by the ton with no complaints.
    >>

    >
    >
    > This might be another of those cases where cuts of meat are named
    > differently in various places, like London Broils. What you described
    > sounds to me sounds like what is sold as baby back ribs here. The
    > country ribs that I have seen in the past are usually about a 2 pound
    > chunk of pork that has a number of bones, a lot of gristle, serious
    > layers of fat, and maybe 20% of the total is meat. It is tasty meat, but
    > way too much hassle to cook and gnaw at for the amount of edible meat.
    >
    > ***************
    > I believe it is indeed considered a different cut of pork between the
    > U.S. and Canada. The ones I buy a couple of times a year are very meaty.
    > No gristle. No "silverskin" to remove from the back of the ribs before
    > cooking them. Country ribs are not at all the same as spare or baby back ribs.
    >
    > Jill


    It appears what exactly you get, is what the butcher cuts. Mine look like
    perfect square logs, and narrow enough to cook faster.

    http://www.bbq-fyi.com/what-are-country-style-ribs.html

    Greg

  2. #42
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    On Tue, 2 Oct 2012 01:39:54 +0000 (UTC), gregz wrote:

    > Do you really need butter ?? It does make it look pretty.


    Do you really need bacon?

    -sw

  3. #43
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    I cooked them today. Early this morning, I transferred them from the
    package to a gallon ziplock bag, with a BIG squirt of French's yellow
    mustard, and worked it around until they were all covered, then put it
    back in the fridge for about 5 or 6 hours.

    I put them in a glass baking dish with some apple slices and sprinkled
    with just a little salt, and baked at 300 degrees for a couple of hours.
    They turned out great, but would have been better if I hadn't crowded
    them -- the meat on top where it was exposed to the direct oven heat was
    much better than the bottom half that was protected by the sides of the
    pan and the juices that cooked out. I will cook them again this way,
    there's one package in the freezer, but I'll use a bigger pan next time.

    I made some sweet-n-sour brazed red cabbage to go with it, and boiled
    some 'B'-sized red potatoes.

    The "ribs" were /kind of/ fatty, but mostly meat with hardly any bones.
    I went back to the store a few days ago to get more and the had sold
    out. I will have to watch for these again, even if the price is higher.
    (this would be perfect meat for making sausage)

    Bob

  4. #44
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    "gregz" wrote in message
    news:[email protected]org...

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Dave Smith" wrote in message news:I6jas.29645$[email protected]..
    >
    > On 01/10/2012 11:07 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >> Dave Smith wrote:
    >>>
    >>> I have not bought country ribs in years. My experience with that cut is
    >>> that it bone, a lot of fat, more fat, and a bit of meat. IMO it is not
    >>> even worth cooking.

    >>
    >> Then you have a lousy butcher or you need new glasses. I find that
    >> country style pork ribs to be very meaty, they contain no more
    >> fat/bone than pork chops. Spare ribs have more waste, a lot more
    >> waste. And very often there are boneless country style pork ribs, I
    >> prefer those. Anyway most pork cuts are fatty... bacon is almost all
    >> fat and yet people buy it by the ton with no complaints.
    >>

    >
    >
    > This might be another of those cases where cuts of meat are named
    > differently in various places, like London Broils. What you described
    > sounds to me sounds like what is sold as baby back ribs here. The
    > country ribs that I have seen in the past are usually about a 2 pound
    > chunk of pork that has a number of bones, a lot of gristle, serious
    > layers of fat, and maybe 20% of the total is meat. It is tasty meat, but
    > way too much hassle to cook and gnaw at for the amount of edible meat.
    >
    > ***************
    > I believe it is indeed considered a different cut of pork between the
    > U.S. and Canada. The ones I buy a couple of times a year are very meaty.
    > No gristle. No "silverskin" to remove from the back of the ribs before
    > cooking them. Country ribs are not at all the same as spare or baby back
    > ribs.
    >
    > Jill


    It appears what exactly you get, is what the butcher cuts. Mine look like
    perfect square logs, and narrow enough to cook faster.

    http://www.bbq-fyi.com/what-are-country-style-ribs.html

    Greg
    ***************

    From the RFC web site:

    http://www.recfoodcooking.org/sigs/J...ry%20Ribs.html

    Jill


  5. #45
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    On 10/6/2012 6:15 PM, zxcvbob wrote:

    > The "ribs" were /kind of/ fatty, but mostly meat with hardly any bones.
    > I went back to the store a few days ago to get more and the had sold
    > out. I will have to watch for these again, even if the price is higher.
    > (this would be perfect meat for making sausage)


    Your method sounds really good. The reason I finish them on the grill
    is because of the fat you mentioned. The fat can get cooked and tasty.


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