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Thread: Pork "country style ribs"

  1. #21
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    Dave Smith wrote:
    >
    > I have not bought country ribs in years. My experience with that cut is
    > that it bone, a lot of fat, more fat, and a bit of meat. IMO it is not
    > even worth cooking.


    Then you have a lousy butcher or you need new glasses. I find that
    country style pork ribs to be very meaty, they contain no more
    fat/bone than pork chops. Spare ribs have more waste, a lot more
    waste. And very often there are boneless country style pork ribs, I
    prefer those. Anyway most pork cuts are fatty... bacon is almost all
    fat and yet people buy it by the ton with no complaints.

  2. #22
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    Mike Mouth wrote:
    >> On Sep 30, 3:58 pm, zxcvbob <zxcv...@charter.net> wrote:
    >> (I know they are not ribs)
    >>
    >> Bought some today for 99¢ per pound. How best to prepare them to go
    >> with sweet-n-sour braised red cabbage and spätzle or boiled new
    >> potatoes? (something Germanic, it's that time of the year)
    >>
    >> Just roast them with a little S&P? Mike Muth, do you have any recipes?
    >> I could line them all up in a pan and tie them, and pretend they are a
    >> small roast.

    >
    > I'm afraid I don't have any rib recipes. We generally don't eat them
    > in our family.


    Then WTF did you bother replying to this post?!?!? DUH

  3. #23
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sep 30, 5:20*pm, Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    >>
    >> On 30/09/2012 6:12 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >>
    >> >> I should probably go back and get more to fill the freezer while they
    >> >> are on sale.

    >>
    >>
    >> I have not bought country ribs in years. My experience with that cut is
    >> that it bone, a lot of fat, more fat, and a bit of meat. IMO it is not
    >> even worth cooking.


    >You need to find a better supplier of this cut.


    In my experience, they are a pork rib with a pork loin chop still attached.
    They do not have excess bone compared to a normal pork rib.

    They present a cooking quandry as they contain some rib meat that wants
    to be slow-cooked, and a larger piece of loin meat that is better off
    being grilled. I suspect most people just grill them.

    Steve

  4. #24
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    On Oct 1, 10:27*am, spop...@speedymail.org (Steve Pope) wrote:
    >
    > itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net <itsjoannotjo...@webtv.net> wrote:
    >
    > >On Sep 30, 5:20 pm, Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:

    >
    > >> On 30/09/2012 6:12 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

    >
    > >> >> I should probably go back and get more to fill the freezer while they
    > >> >> are on sale.

    >
    > >> I have not bought country ribs in years. My experience with that cut is
    > >> that it bone, a lot of fat, more fat, and a bit of meat. IMO it is not
    > >> even worth cooking.

    > >You need to find a better supplier of this cut.

    >
    > In my experience, they are a pork rib with a pork loin chop still attached.
    > They do not have excess bone compared to a normal pork rib.
    >
    > They present a cooking quandry as they contain some rib meat that wants
    > to be slow-cooked, and a larger piece of loin meat that is better off
    > being grilled. *I suspect most people just grill them.
    >
    > Steve
    >
    >

    I've grilled them, baked them, and flung 'em in the crockpot. All
    three methods were delicious and I'll take them anyway you present
    them.


  5. #25
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    On 01/10/2012 11:07 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > Dave Smith wrote:
    >>
    >> I have not bought country ribs in years. My experience with that cut is
    >> that it bone, a lot of fat, more fat, and a bit of meat. IMO it is not
    >> even worth cooking.

    >
    > Then you have a lousy butcher or you need new glasses. I find that
    > country style pork ribs to be very meaty, they contain no more
    > fat/bone than pork chops. Spare ribs have more waste, a lot more
    > waste. And very often there are boneless country style pork ribs, I
    > prefer those. Anyway most pork cuts are fatty... bacon is almost all
    > fat and yet people buy it by the ton with no complaints.
    >



    This might be another of those cases where cuts of meat are named
    differently in various places, like London Broils. What you described
    sounds to me sounds like what is sold as baby back ribs here. The
    country ribs that I have seen in the past are usually about a 2 pound
    chunk of pork that has a number of bones, a lot of gristle, serious
    layers of fat, and maybe 20% of the total is meat. It is tasty meat, but
    way too much hassle to cook and gnaw at for the amount of edible meat.


  6. #26
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    On 10/1/2012 10:11 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > Mike Mouth wrote:
    >>> On Sep 30, 3:58 pm, zxcvbob<zxcv...@charter.net> wrote:
    >>> (I know they are not ribs)
    >>>
    >>> Bought some today for 99¢ per pound. How best to prepare them to go
    >>> with sweet-n-sour braised red cabbage and spätzle or boiled new
    >>> potatoes? (something Germanic, it's that time of the year)
    >>>
    >>> Just roast them with a little S&P? Mike Muth, do you have any recipes?
    >>> I could line them all up in a pan and tie them, and pretend they are a
    >>> small roast.

    >>
    >> I'm afraid I don't have any rib recipes. We generally don't eat them
    >> in our family.

    >
    > Then WTF did you bother replying to this post?!?!? DUH



    Maybe because I specifically asked him if he had a recipe? >:-(

    I don't want to cook them in sauerkraut because I will be serving red
    cabbage on the side. Someone mentioned mustard, and I like that idea.
    I may marinate them in a bag with some yellow mustard and apple slices
    (I bought a half-bushel bag of apple "seconds" at the orchard
    yesterday), then roast them slow on a rack until the gristle gets
    unctuous.

    Bob

  7. #27
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    On Mon, 1 Oct 2012 15:27:15 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:

    > [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sep 30, 5:20*pm, Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> On 30/09/2012 6:12 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >>>
    >>> >> I should probably go back and get more to fill the freezer while they
    >>> >> are on sale.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I have not bought country ribs in years. My experience with that cut is
    >>> that it bone, a lot of fat, more fat, and a bit of meat. IMO it is not
    >>> even worth cooking.

    >
    >>You need to find a better supplier of this cut.

    >
    > In my experience, they are a pork rib with a pork loin chop still attached.
    > They do not have excess bone compared to a normal pork rib.


    They usually have a portion of the back bone attached to them (in the
    LOIN style that you are referring to).

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...ream/lightbox/

    Like I said before, this style is much rarer than the ones from the
    shoulder, but some locals (like the Carolinas), these are always
    available.

    -sw

  8. #28
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    zxcvbob wrote:

    > (I know they are not ribs)
    >
    > Bought some today for 99¢ per pound. How best to prepare them to go
    > with sweet-n-sour braised red cabbage and spätzle or boiled new
    > potatoes? (something Germanic, it's that time of the year)
    >
    > Just roast them with a little S&P? Mike Muth, do you have any recipes?


    Treat them like spare ribs. I like to simmer them to cook through,
    then brown with high heat.



  9. #29
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    On Oct 1, 11:56*am, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >
    >
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...ream/lightbox/
    >
    > Like I said before, this style is much rarer than the ones from the
    > shoulder, but some locals (like the Carolinas), these are always
    > available.
    >
    > -sw
    >
    >

    This is how we get them here, too. Yummmmm.

  10. #30
    Mike Muth Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    On Oct 1, 11:10*am, zxcvbob <zxcv...@charter.net> wrote:
    > On 10/1/2012 10:11 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Mike Mouth wrote:
    > >>> On Sep 30, 3:58 pm, zxcvbob<zxcv...@charter.net> *wrote:
    > >>> (I know they are not ribs)

    >
    > >>> Bought some today for 99¢ per pound. *How best to prepare them togo
    > >>> with sweet-n-sour braised red cabbage and spätzle or boiled new
    > >>> potatoes? *(something Germanic, it's that time of the year)

    >
    > >>> Just roast them with a little S&P? *Mike Muth, do you have any recipes?
    > >>> * *I could line them all up in a pan and tie them, and pretend they are a
    > >>> small roast.

    >
    > >> I'm afraid I don't have any rib recipes. *We generally don't eat them
    > >> in our family.

    >
    > > Then WTF did you bother replying to this post?!?!? DUH

    >
    > Maybe because I specifically asked him if he had a recipe? *>:-(


    Don't mind him. He's just upset because I still post in rfc.

    > I don't want to cook them in sauerkraut because I will be serving red
    > cabbage on the side. *Someone mentioned mustard, and I like that idea.
    > I may marinate them in a bag with some yellow mustard and apple slices
    > (I bought a half-bushel bag of apple "seconds" at the orchard
    > yesterday), then roast them slow on a rack until the gristle gets
    > unctuous.


    There is a recipe in the White House Cookbook (accessible on-line) for
    pork ribs. ISTR that it calls for "stuffing" the ribs.

    --
    Mike




  11. #31
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    On Mon, 1 Oct 2012 15:27:15 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve
    Pope) wrote:

    >[email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Sep 30, 5:20*pm, Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> On 30/09/2012 6:12 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >>>
    >>> >> I should probably go back and get more to fill the freezer while they
    >>> >> are on sale.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I have not bought country ribs in years. My experience with that cut is
    >>> that it bone, a lot of fat, more fat, and a bit of meat. IMO it is not
    >>> even worth cooking.

    >
    >>You need to find a better supplier of this cut.

    >
    >In my experience, they are a pork rib with a pork loin chop still attached.
    >They do not have excess bone compared to a normal pork rib.
    >
    >They present a cooking quandry as they contain some rib meat that wants
    >to be slow-cooked, and a larger piece of loin meat that is better off
    >being grilled. I suspect most people just grill them.
    >
    >Steve


    Here are pictures of the various pork cuts in question, country style
    ribs are meaty and tasty, the excess fat renders out when properly
    cooked:
    http://www.foodsubs.com/MeatPorkLoin.html
    It's baby back ribs that I think are awful, boney and don't even taste
    good... I'd not bother with baby back ribs even if for free.

  12. #32
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    On Mon, 01 Oct 2012 07:58:09 -0600, Janet Bostwick wrote:

    > With sauerkraut, chopped apple, brown sugar, garlic , salt and pepper.
    > Boiled potatoes on the side. But, you already have a cabbage dish, so
    > forget what I said.


    That's usually my preferred method for those pork butt ribs. But
    never sweet. Just sauerkraut, onions, and potatoes all simmered (or
    baked, or crockpotted) together.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/7275891...n/photostream/

    -sw

  13. #33
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    On 10/1/2012 11:27 AM, Steve Pope wrote:
    > [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sep 30, 5:20 pm, Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> On 30/09/2012 6:12 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> I should probably go back and get more to fill the freezer while they
    >>>>> are on sale.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I have not bought country ribs in years. My experience with that cut is
    >>> that it bone, a lot of fat, more fat, and a bit of meat. IMO it is not
    >>> even worth cooking.

    >
    >> You need to find a better supplier of this cut.

    >
    > In my experience, they are a pork rib with a pork loin chop still attached.
    > They do not have excess bone compared to a normal pork rib.
    >
    > They present a cooking quandry as they contain some rib meat that wants
    > to be slow-cooked, and a larger piece of loin meat that is better off
    > being grilled. I suspect most people just grill them.
    >

    In my experience they are mostly shoulder cut into what would be a roast
    if they left it whole.


  14. #34
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    On 10/1/2012 1:21 PM, George M. Middius wrote:
    > zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    >> (I know they are not ribs)
    >>
    >> Bought some today for 99¢ per pound. How best to prepare them to go
    >> with sweet-n-sour braised red cabbage and spätzle or boiled new
    >> potatoes? (something Germanic, it's that time of the year)
    >>
    >> Just roast them with a little S&P? Mike Muth, do you have any recipes?

    >
    > Treat them like spare ribs. I like to simmer them to cook through,
    > then brown with high heat.


    I like to throw a couple into a pot of (pasta) sauce, then
    you get bits of pork along with your sausage or meatball and
    spaghetti.

    nancy


  15. #35
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    "Dave Smith" wrote in message news:FA3as.1046$[email protected]..

    On 30/09/2012 6:12 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

    >> I should probably go back and get more to fill the freezer while they
    >> are on sale.

    >
    > Whatever you decide, low and slow. I usually put them in the smoker
    > for four or five hours at 250, but the oven will be similar in texture
    > if you do it at low temp.
    >



    I have not bought country ribs in years. My experience with that cut is
    that it bone, a lot of fat, more fat, and a bit of meat. IMO it is not
    even worth cooking.

    *****************
    Not my experience at all. There's little (if any) bone, lots of meat. The
    fat is on the outer edge and easily trimmed prior to doing anything with
    them. I like to marinate this cut of "ribs" in a
    teriyaki/garlic/onion/mandarin orange slice and oil combination, pureed then
    poured over the meat and refrigerated. I usually marinate them overnight,
    turning once. Grilled or baked, cook them low and slow. If you grill them
    be sure to turn and baste them frequently.

    Jill


  16. #36
    Mike Muth Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    On Sep 30, 3:58*pm, zxcvbob <zxcv...@charter.net> wrote:
    > (I know they are not ribs)
    >
    > Bought some today for 99¢ per pound. *How best to prepare them to go
    > with sweet-n-sour braised red cabbage and spätzle or boiled new
    > potatoes? *(something Germanic, it's that time of the year)
    >
    > Just roast them with a little S&P? *Mike Muth, do you have any recipes?
    > * I could line them all up in a pan and tie them, and pretend they are a
    > small roast.


    This isn't Germanic, but you might like it:

    Crock Pot Ribs
    This is from the Elmont United Methodist Church Cookbook.
    203 grams net carbs total.

    2 lbs country style ribs
    1/2 cup onion, chopped
    1/2 cup flour
    salt
    pepper
    3/4 cup catsup
    2 Tbsp vinegar
    2 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce
    1 Tbsp soy sauce
    1/2 cup sugar
    water

    Combine the flour with some salt and pepper (to taste).
    Roll the ribs in the flour.
    Put the ribs in the crockpot.
    Add the onions.
    Mix the remaining ingredients and the remaining flour mixture.
    If necessary, thin the sauce with a bit of water.
    Pour the sauce over the ribs.
    Cook on high for 5 or 6 hours.

  17. #37
    gregz Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Mon, 01 Oct 2012 07:58:09 -0600, Janet Bostwick wrote:
    >
    >> With sauerkraut, chopped apple, brown sugar, garlic , salt and pepper.
    >> Boiled potatoes on the side. But, you already have a cabbage dish, so
    >> forget what I said.

    >
    > That's usually my preferred method for those pork butt ribs. But
    > never sweet. Just sauerkraut, onions, and potatoes all simmered (or
    > baked, or crockpotted) together.
    >
    > http://www.flickr.com/photos/7275891...n/photostream/
    >
    > -sw


    No caraway seeds ?

    Do you really need butter ?? It does make it look pretty.

    Greg

  18. #38
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    "Dave Smith" wrote in message news:I6jas.29645$[email protected]..

    On 01/10/2012 11:07 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > Dave Smith wrote:
    >>
    >> I have not bought country ribs in years. My experience with that cut is
    >> that it bone, a lot of fat, more fat, and a bit of meat. IMO it is not
    >> even worth cooking.

    >
    > Then you have a lousy butcher or you need new glasses. I find that
    > country style pork ribs to be very meaty, they contain no more
    > fat/bone than pork chops. Spare ribs have more waste, a lot more
    > waste. And very often there are boneless country style pork ribs, I
    > prefer those. Anyway most pork cuts are fatty... bacon is almost all
    > fat and yet people buy it by the ton with no complaints.
    >



    This might be another of those cases where cuts of meat are named
    differently in various places, like London Broils. What you described
    sounds to me sounds like what is sold as baby back ribs here. The
    country ribs that I have seen in the past are usually about a 2 pound
    chunk of pork that has a number of bones, a lot of gristle, serious
    layers of fat, and maybe 20% of the total is meat. It is tasty meat, but
    way too much hassle to cook and gnaw at for the amount of edible meat.

    ***************
    I believe it is indeed considered a different cut of pork between the U.S.
    and Canada. The ones I buy a couple of times a year are very meaty. No
    gristle. No "silverskin" to remove from the back of the ribs before cooking
    them. Country ribs are not at all the same as spare or baby back ribs.

    Jill


  19. #39
    gregz Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    Nancy Young <replyto@inemail> wrote:
    > On 10/1/2012 1:21 PM, George M. Middius wrote:
    >> zxcvbob wrote:
    >>
    >>> (I know they are not ribs)
    >>>
    >>> Bought some today for 99¢ per pound. How best to prepare them to go
    >>> with sweet-n-sour braised red cabbage and spätzle or boiled new
    >>> potatoes? (something Germanic, it's that time of the year)
    >>>
    >>> Just roast them with a little S&P? Mike Muth, do you have any recipes?

    >>
    >> Treat them like spare ribs. I like to simmer them to cook through,
    >> then brown with high heat.

    >
    > I like to throw a couple into a pot of (pasta) sauce, then
    > you get bits of pork along with your sausage or meatball and
    > spaghetti.
    >
    > nancy


    My mother used to add pork to the sauce, and I liked it.
    Now days, I don't want any meat to mess up my marinara sauce.
    I like meat on the side, including steak.

    Greg

  20. #40
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Pork "country style ribs"

    On 10/1/2012 9:44 PM, gregz wrote:
    > Nancy Young <replyto@inemail> wrote:


    >> I like to throw a couple into a pot of (pasta) sauce, then
    >> you get bits of pork along with your sausage or meatball and
    >> spaghetti.


    > My mother used to add pork to the sauce, and I liked it.
    > Now days, I don't want any meat to mess up my marinara sauce.
    > I like meat on the side, including steak.


    I wouldn't want meat in marinara, either. But the Sunday sauce,
    meatballs and sausage are the minimum meat requirements.

    nancy


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