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Thread: Polenta

  1. #1
    Giusi Guest

    Default Polenta

    http://www.italiannotebook.com/food-wine/polenta/

    I saw this fun note on the subject in a newslwttwr I get. I thought you
    might like it too.



  2. #2
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Polenta

    On Jan 11, 9:47*am, "Giusi" <decob...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > http://www.italiannotebook.com/food-wine/polenta/
    >
    > I saw this fun note on the subject in a newslwttwr I get. *I thought you
    > might like it too.


    Did giusi really send this? This reads like robospam. I would click on
    a cached version, but "italiannotebook.com" apparently does not allow
    caching.

  3. #3
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Polenta

    On Jan 11, 9:47*am, "Giusi" <decob...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > http://www.italiannotebook.com/food-wine/polenta/
    >
    > I saw this fun note on the subject in a newslwttwr I get. *I thought you
    > might like it too.


    Thanks- I love polenta. When we were in Italy this last summer, we
    were served "Polenta di Patate"- delicious!

  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Polenta

    On Wed, 11 Jan 2012 18:47:40 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > http://www.italiannotebook.com/food-wine/polenta/
    >
    > I saw this fun note on the subject in a newslwttwr I get. I thought you
    > might like it too.
    >


    I do, I do! I also like those wooden "plates". Are they common in
    Italy?
    --

    Ham and eggs.
    A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

  5. #5
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Polenta

    On Jan 11, 10:40*am, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Wed, 11 Jan 2012 18:47:40 +0100, "Giusi" <decob...@gmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >http://www.italiannotebook.com/food-wine/polenta/

    >
    > > I saw this fun note on the subject in a newslwttwr I get. *I thought you
    > > might like it too.

    >
    > I do, I do! *I also like those wooden "plates". *Are they common in
    > Italy?
    > --
    >
    > Ham and eggs.
    > A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.


    Polenta is usually served on a wood board, and then cut with a string.

  6. #6
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Polenta


    "spamtrap1888" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    "Giusi" <decob...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > http://www.italiannotebook.com/food-wine/polenta/
    >
    > I saw this fun note on the subject in a newslwttwr I get. I thought you
    > might like it too.


    Did giusi really send this? This reads like robospam. I would click on
    a cached version, but "italiannotebook.com" apparently does not allow
    caching.

    Robome. It is not spam. It's anewsletter sent to Italy lovers everyday.
    Don't dare? Don't go.



  7. #7
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Polenta


    "sf" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> http://www.italiannotebook.com/food-wine/polenta/
    >>
    >> I saw this fun note on the subject in a newslwttwr I get. I thought you
    >> might like it too.
    >>

    >
    > I do, I do! I also like those wooden "plates". Are they common in
    > Italy?


    Not here, maybe up north. I have as long olivewood bowl that looks like a
    shy dugout canoe that I use just for polenta.



  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Polenta

    On Wed, 11 Jan 2012 19:59:33 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> http://www.italiannotebook.com/food-wine/polenta/
    > >>
    > >> I saw this fun note on the subject in a newslwttwr I get. I thought you
    > >> might like it too.
    > >>

    > >
    > > I do, I do! I also like those wooden "plates". Are they common in
    > > Italy?

    >
    > Not here, maybe up north. I have as long olivewood bowl that looks like a
    > shy dugout canoe that I use just for polenta.
    >


    Hmmm. Maybe I should ask someone I know up in Oregon if she knows a
    wood worker who could duplicate those plates.
    --

    Ham and eggs.
    A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

  9. #9
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Polenta

    On Jan 11, 10:58*am, "Giusi" <decob...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > "spamtrap1888" <spamtrap1...@gmail.com> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >
    > *"Giusi" <decob...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > >http://www.italiannotebook.com/food-wine/polenta/

    >
    > > I saw this fun note on the subject in a newslwttwr I get. I thought you
    > > might like it too.

    >
    > Did giusi really send this? This reads like robospam. I would click on
    > a cached version, but "italiannotebook.com" apparently does not allow
    > caching.
    >
    > Robome. *It is not spam. *It's anewsletter sent to Italy lovers everyday.
    > Don't dare? Don't go.


    Thanks. The wording didn't sound like you -- the "I thought you"
    sounded just too generic. Almost as bad as blog comments like: "I
    found this post to be fascinating"

  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Polenta

    On Wed, 11 Jan 2012 10:45:43 -0800 (PST), merryb <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > On Jan 11, 10:40*am, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > > On Wed, 11 Jan 2012 18:47:40 +0100, "Giusi" <decob...@gmail.com>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > >http://www.italiannotebook.com/food-wine/polenta/

    > >
    > > > I saw this fun note on the subject in a newslwttwr I get. *I thought you
    > > > might like it too.

    > >
    > > I do, I do! *I also like those wooden "plates". *Are they common in
    > > Italy?
    > > --
    > >
    > > Ham and eggs.
    > > A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

    >
    > Polenta is usually served on a wood board, and then cut with a string.


    I've never seen that done, ever. Don't know very many Italians, but
    the few I know haven't talked about doing that either. Guess I don't
    know the right people.
    --

    Ham and eggs.
    A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

  11. #11
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Polenta

    On Jan 11, 3:24*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Wed, 11 Jan 2012 10:45:43 -0800 (PST), merryb <msg...@juno.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jan 11, 10:40 am, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > > > On Wed, 11 Jan 2012 18:47:40 +0100, "Giusi" <decob...@gmail.com>
    > > > wrote:

    >
    > > > >http://www.italiannotebook.com/food-wine/polenta/

    >
    > > > > I saw this fun note on the subject in a newslwttwr I get. I thoughtyou
    > > > > might like it too.

    >
    > > > I do, I do! I also like those wooden "plates". Are they common in
    > > > Italy?
    > > > --

    >
    > > > Ham and eggs.
    > > > A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

    >
    > > Polenta is usually served on a wood board, and then cut with a string.

    >
    > I've never seen that done, ever. *Don't know very many Italians, but
    > the few I know haven't talked about doing that either. *Guess I don't
    > know the right people. *
    > --
    >
    > Ham and eggs.
    > A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.


    That seems to be the way it's done in the north, but that's the only
    place I ate it when we were there, so can't say for all regions.
    Traditionally, it's cooked in a copper pot and stirred with a wooden
    paddle. When I was a kid, my grandma would host a big polenta dinner-
    the men were in charge of stirring the pot while the women did all the
    other stuff. I actually inherited that pot and it's hanging up in my
    kitchen

  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Polenta

    On Wed, 11 Jan 2012 15:35:29 -0800 (PST), merryb <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > On Jan 11, 3:24*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:


    > > *Guess I don't know the right people. *
    > > --

    >
    > That seems to be the way it's done in the north, but that's the only
    > place I ate it when we were there, so can't say for all regions.



    Oh okay., thanks. The people I know are from the south and Sicily

    --

    Ham and eggs.
    A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

  13. #13
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Polenta


    "merryb" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    Polenta is usually served on a wood board, and then cut with a string.

    I serve it creamier so you spoon it.



  14. #14
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Polenta


    "spamtrap1888" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    Thanks. The wording didn't sound like you -- the "I thought you"
    sounded just too generic. Almost as bad as blog comments like: "I
    found this post to be fascinating"

    No one's typos are just like mine, unless they too are typing on a miniature
    Italian keyboard.



  15. #15
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Polenta


    "merryb" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio . When I was a kid, my
    grandma would host a big polenta dinner-
    the men were in charge of stirring the pot while the women did all the
    other stuff. I actually inherited that pot and it's hanging up in my
    kitchen

    Then get it out, scrub it with lemon and salt and make polenta! I have two,
    the one that looks like a copper pail with a wooden handle and another that
    looks like a huge copper basin. But you can make small amounts, too, or you
    can make it in any heavy pan, although a flame tamer is a great help for
    making cleanup less agony.



  16. #16
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Polenta


    "sf" <[email protected]> ha

    , merryb <[email protected]>
    > wrote:


    >> That seems to be the way it's done in the north, but that's the only
    >> place I ate it when we were there, so can't say for all regions.

    >
    >
    > Oh okay., thanks. The people I know are from the south and Sicily


    Where it isn't part of the culture, but like any people, nowadays they do
    eat it. Polenta can be firm enough to cut or creamy, and creamy is my
    style. If you make extra you can pour it out on a board or a stone slab and
    let it firm up to store for another day. That is cut to store. Pieces do
    tend to stick together though.



  17. #17
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Polenta

    sf wrote:

    >> Polenta is usually served on a wood board, and then cut with a
    >> string.


    > I've never seen that done, ever. Don't know very many Italians, but
    > the few I know haven't talked about doing that either. Guess I don't
    > know the right people.


    It's a question of time: the one described by merryb is the old fashion,
    used in almost all of Italy untile some decades ago. My granny served
    polenta like that, too. My mother not, she uses normal dishes as almost
    everybody does nowadays. Some restaurant serves polenta the old fashion,
    though.




  18. #18
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Polenta

    Giusi wrote:

    >> Polenta is usually served on a wood board, and then cut with a string.


    > I serve it creamier so you spoon it.


    Me too. I had string-cut polenta only once in my life, during a holiday in
    the Alps, 30 years ago




  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Polenta

    On Thu, 12 Jan 2012 08:31:04 +0100, "Giusi" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> ha
    >
    > , merryb <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:

    >
    > >> That seems to be the way it's done in the north, but that's the only
    > >> place I ate it when we were there, so can't say for all regions.

    > >
    > >
    > > Oh okay., thanks. The people I know are from the south and Sicily

    >
    > Where it isn't part of the culture, but like any people, nowadays they do
    > eat it. Polenta can be firm enough to cut or creamy, and creamy is my
    > style. If you make extra you can pour it out on a board or a stone slab and
    > let it firm up to store for another day. That is cut to store. Pieces do
    > tend to stick together though.
    >

    I've made polenta just to firm up and fry. It's the eating off the
    board part that was new to me. I'd heard of it, but I thought it was
    a long gone tradition.

    Do you really constantly stir the polenta for 45 minutes?
    --

    Ham and eggs.
    A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

  20. #20
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Polenta

    On Thu, 12 Jan 2012 10:24:22 +0100, "ViLco" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf wrote:
    >
    > >> Polenta is usually served on a wood board, and then cut with a
    > >> string.

    >
    > > I've never seen that done, ever. Don't know very many Italians, but
    > > the few I know haven't talked about doing that either. Guess I don't
    > > know the right people.

    >
    > It's a question of time: the one described by merryb is the old fashion,
    > used in almost all of Italy untile some decades ago. My granny served
    > polenta like that, too. My mother not, she uses normal dishes as almost
    > everybody does nowadays. Some restaurant serves polenta the old fashion,
    > though.
    >

    Aha, thanks! I had a feeling it was a tradition that had fallen by
    the wayside because I had one friend (the Sicilian one) whose family
    made polenta and "gravy" (which was a new concept to me at the time)
    never talked about eating communally from a wooden board.
    --

    Ham and eggs.
    A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

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