Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 31

Thread: Poblanos

  1. #1
    l not -l Guest

    Default Poblanos

    Until recently I had only one use for poblanos; stuffed with egg,
    chorizo and cheese. In fact, that is what I had for breakfast this
    morning. However, recently I tried a poblano and corn soup recipe from
    Pati's Mexican Table and liked it well enough to have periodically.

    The local international grocer only sells poblanos in multi-packs,
    usually 3-6 poblanos; but, the price is only slightly more than a single
    poblano is at the supermarket. Besides price, the international grocer
    poblanos are better quality; no doubt because they sell faster than at
    the supermarket.

    If I had a broader range of uses, I could always buy poblanos from the
    international grocer and use them before they began their decline.

    What are your favorite uses/recipes for poblano peppers?
    --

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  2. #2
    Silvar Beitel Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    On Jan 23, 10:00*am, "l not -l" <lal...@cujo.com> wrote:
    > Until recently I had only one use for poblanos; stuffed with egg,
    > chorizo and cheese. *In fact, that is what I had for breakfast this
    > morning. *However, recently I tried a poblano and corn soup recipe from
    > Pati's Mexican Table and liked it well enough to have periodically.
    >
    > The local international grocer only sells poblanos in multi-packs,
    > usually 3-6 poblanos; but, the price is only slightly more than a single
    > poblano is at the supermarket. *Besides price, the international grocer
    > poblanos are better quality; no doubt because they sell faster than at
    > the supermarket.
    >
    > If I had a broader range of uses, I could always buy poblanos from the
    > international grocer and use them before they began their decline.
    >
    > What are your favorite uses/recipes for poblano peppers?


    Chile rellenos, of course!

    I also like to stuff them with potato chunks along with the cheese.

    I also sometimes just roll them in bread crumbs and bake them rather
    than egg and deep-fry.

    I have a batch right now that I'm planning to stuff with a
    reconstituted salt cod, potato, and tomato mix - going for a Basque-
    like flavor.

    They're also my substitute for Hatch or other green chiles - after
    roasting, I'll dice 'em up and freeze 'em in 4-ounce packets for those
    occasions that call for "a can of diced green chiles."

    I get 'em at the asian/hispanic store too. As you note, cheaper and
    usually fresher than the supermarket.
    Same with jalepenos (and the excess of those get sliced and pickled).

    --
    Silvar Beitel



  3. #3
    Ema Nymton Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    On 1/23/2013 9:00 AM, l not -l wrote:
    > Until recently I had only one use for poblanos; stuffed with egg,
    > chorizo and cheese. In fact, that is what I had for breakfast this
    > morning. However, recently I tried a poblano and corn soup recipe from
    > Pati's Mexican Table and liked it well enough to have periodically.
    >
    > The local international grocer only sells poblanos in multi-packs,
    > usually 3-6 poblanos; but, the price is only slightly more than a single
    > poblano is at the supermarket. Besides price, the international grocer
    > poblanos are better quality; no doubt because they sell faster than at
    > the supermarket.
    >
    > If I had a broader range of uses, I could always buy poblanos from the
    > international grocer and use them before they began their decline.
    >
    > What are your favorite uses/recipes for poblano peppers?


    Chopped and sauteed poblanos can be added to the filling in enchiladas
    and I use them when I make Chile Relleno.

    Becca


  4. #4
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    l not -l <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Until recently I had only one use for poblanos; stuffed with egg,
    > chorizo and cheese. In fact, that is what I had for breakfast this
    > morning. However, recently I tried a poblano and corn soup recipe
    > from Pati's Mexican Table and liked it well enough to have
    > periodically.
    >
    > The local international grocer only sells poblanos in multi-packs,
    > usually 3-6 poblanos; but, the price is only slightly more than a
    > single poblano is at the supermarket. Besides price, the
    > international grocer poblanos are better quality; no doubt because
    > they sell faster than at the supermarket.
    >
    > If I had a broader range of uses, I could always buy poblanos from the
    > international grocer and use them before they began their decline.
    >
    > What are your favorite uses/recipes for poblano peppers?


    One of my favorite vegetables.

    Stuffed, the possibilities are endless. I like to use either chile verde
    (green sauce) or chile colorado (red sauce ) base plus proteins and/or
    veggies. Fire roasted peppers and onions with some grilled chicken, for
    example. Pork in most any form mixed with the chile verde. I often keep a
    puree of reconstituted chile anchos (dried poblanos!) which is a base for
    the chile colorado, and that base tastes great mixed with some cream cheese,
    crema or creme fraiche, and a mexican stye cheese melted in. I might finish
    them in the oven covered with one of the sauces and lots of cheese. Some
    roasted corn cut from the cob is good in the filling too. Corn, cream
    cheese, some chopped roasted sweet peppers, and some pureed chipotle in
    adobo is pretty tasty. Occasionally I even follow the strict relleno method
    and deep fry them with a thin tempura or maybe a cornstarch and egg batter.
    They can be filled with anything when fried. I like a combo filling of
    chorizo, ground beef, onions, chipotle, and cheese.

    Fire roasted and peeled they enhance any recipe where you would use roasted
    sweet peppers. I routinely use roasted chopped poblanos in chiles and stews.
    And the roasted ones can be minced or pureed and used in sauces. A poblano
    cream sauce will transform your chorizo and eggs or some grilled salmon.

    They are trickier to roast and peel than sweet bells because the flesh is
    thinner. It's best done quickly over high heat. And of course the fresher
    the better for roasting.

    And of course you can just roast, peel, and cut in strips, and serve them in
    sour cream or creme fraiche. Delicious.

    One thing I like is that they deliver a lot of hot pepper type of flavor
    with relatively little heat. So you can use quite a bit, use it freely, in
    dishes where you might need to be judicious if using only jalapenos or
    serranos. They also deliver much more flavor and a more nuanced flavor than
    anaheim/hatch/long green etc. type chiles. So where a recipe calls for diced
    green chiles, mine will often be diced poblanos.

    I still use anaheims, both fresh and canned. One thing I can't find is
    canned poblanos, in particular whole. I get whole anaheims canned at a
    hispanic neighborhood market, but while I know they exist, I never see
    canned poblanos around here at any kind of store.

    MartyB


  5. #5
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    On Wed, 23 Jan 2013 19:39:36 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <n[email protected]> wrote:

    >l not -l <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Until recently I had only one use for poblanos; stuffed with egg,
    >> chorizo and cheese. In fact, that is what I had for breakfast this
    >> morning. However, recently I tried a poblano and corn soup recipe
    >> from Pati's Mexican Table and liked it well enough to have
    >> periodically.
    >>
    >> The local international grocer only sells poblanos in multi-packs,
    >> usually 3-6 poblanos; but, the price is only slightly more than a
    >> single poblano is at the supermarket. Besides price, the
    >> international grocer poblanos are better quality; no doubt because
    >> they sell faster than at the supermarket.
    >>
    >> If I had a broader range of uses, I could always buy poblanos from the
    >> international grocer and use them before they began their decline.
    >>
    >> What are your favorite uses/recipes for poblano peppers?

    >
    >One of my favorite vegetables.
    >
    >Stuffed, the possibilities are endless. I like to use either chile verde
    >(green sauce) or chile colorado (red sauce ) base plus proteins and/or
    >veggies. Fire roasted peppers and onions with some grilled chicken, for
    >example. Pork in most any form mixed with the chile verde. I often keep a
    >puree of reconstituted chile anchos (dried poblanos!) which is a base for
    >the chile colorado, and that base tastes great mixed with some cream cheese,
    >crema or creme fraiche, and a mexican stye cheese melted in. I might finish
    >them in the oven covered with one of the sauces and lots of cheese. Some
    >roasted corn cut from the cob is good in the filling too. Corn, cream
    >cheese, some chopped roasted sweet peppers, and some pureed chipotle in
    >adobo is pretty tasty. Occasionally I even follow the strict relleno method
    >and deep fry them with a thin tempura or maybe a cornstarch and egg batter.
    >They can be filled with anything when fried. I like a combo filling of
    >chorizo, ground beef, onions, chipotle, and cheese.
    >
    >Fire roasted and peeled they enhance any recipe where you would use roasted
    >sweet peppers. I routinely use roasted chopped poblanos in chiles and stews.
    >And the roasted ones can be minced or pureed and used in sauces. A poblano
    >cream sauce will transform your chorizo and eggs or some grilled salmon.
    >
    >They are trickier to roast and peel than sweet bells because the flesh is
    >thinner. It's best done quickly over high heat. And of course the fresher
    >the better for roasting.
    >
    >And of course you can just roast, peel, and cut in strips, and serve them in
    >sour cream or creme fraiche. Delicious.
    >
    >One thing I like is that they deliver a lot of hot pepper type of flavor
    >with relatively little heat. So you can use quite a bit, use it freely, in
    >dishes where you might need to be judicious if using only jalapenos or
    >serranos. They also deliver much more flavor and a more nuanced flavor than
    >anaheim/hatch/long green etc. type chiles. So where a recipe calls for diced
    >green chiles, mine will often be diced poblanos.
    >
    >I still use anaheims, both fresh and canned. One thing I can't find is
    >canned poblanos, in particular whole. I get whole anaheims canned at a
    >hispanic neighborhood market, but while I know they exist, I never see
    >canned poblanos around here at any kind of store.
    >
    >MartyB


    If I understand correctly, you are taking the poblanos and using the
    idea of traditional stuffed peppers. . . except you are using more
    traditionally Mexican food ingredients for the filling, and then
    baking them covered with either red or green sauce? Yes?

    It makes sense, I just never thought of Poblanos that way. I can't
    wait to try.
    Thanks
    Janet US

  6. #6
    isw Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    In article <kdotud$tga$[email protected]>, "l not -l" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Until recently I had only one use for poblanos; stuffed with egg,
    > chorizo and cheese. In fact, that is what I had for breakfast this
    > morning. However, recently I tried a poblano and corn soup recipe from
    > Pati's Mexican Table and liked it well enough to have periodically.
    >
    > The local international grocer only sells poblanos in multi-packs,
    > usually 3-6 poblanos; but, the price is only slightly more than a single
    > poblano is at the supermarket. Besides price, the international grocer
    > poblanos are better quality; no doubt because they sell faster than at
    > the supermarket.
    >
    > If I had a broader range of uses, I could always buy poblanos from the
    > international grocer and use them before they began their decline.
    >
    > What are your favorite uses/recipes for poblano peppers?


    I have started using them everywhere I used to use green Bell peppers. I
    like the flavor a lot better -- the poblanos don't have that "green"
    flavor that green Bells have.

    Isaac

  7. #7
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    isw wrote:
    >"l not -l" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> What are your favorite uses/recipes for poblano peppers?

    >
    > I have started using them everywhere I used to use green Bell peppers. I
    > like the flavor a lot better -- the poblanos don't have that "green"
    > flavor that green Bells have.


    I use cubanelles for that purpose these days.

  8. #8
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    On 1/24/2013 11:47 AM, Doug Freyburger wrote:
    > isw wrote:
    >> "l not -l" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> What are your favorite uses/recipes for poblano peppers?

    >> I have started using them everywhere I used to use green Bell peppers. I
    >> like the flavor a lot better -- the poblanos don't have that "green"
    >> flavor that green Bells have.

    > I use cubanelles for that purpose these days.

    I think poblanos go well in most recipes involving green sweet peppers.
    Unfortunately, they usually cost double that of sweet peppers.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.


  9. #9
    bigwheel Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos


    Only limit is the imagination. You got some good leads here. I love em
    toasted up and laid out as a burger addition. Green chile
    soups..stews..enchiladas etc. You a fortunate person to snag those.
    Woops..also roast it up and peel as above for a baked tater topper from
    heaven. Flavor melds perfect with a Irish Tate. First tried that treat
    at the Ore House in Durango? One fine day. Been my favorite ever since.
    You know how to roast and peel em? I cant read all those quotes.




    --
    bigwheel

  10. #10
    l not -l Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos


    On 24-Jan-2013, bigwheel <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You know how to roast and peel em?

    Yes, I've roasted and peeled them many times.
    --

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  11. #11
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    On Wed, 23 Jan 2013 15:00:23 GMT, l not -l wrote:

    > What are your favorite uses/recipes for poblano peppers?


    Roast them just as you would Hatch chiles. They will keep in the
    fridge for 8-10 days, or freeze them. You can then use them in all
    sorts of things, a little or a lot. Different taste than Hatch, but
    just as good if not better.

    -sw

  12. #12
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Wed, 23 Jan 2013 19:39:36 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> l not -l <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> Until recently I had only one use for poblanos; stuffed with egg,
    >>> chorizo and cheese. In fact, that is what I had for breakfast this
    >>> morning. However, recently I tried a poblano and corn soup recipe
    >>> from Pati's Mexican Table and liked it well enough to have
    >>> periodically.
    >>>
    >>> The local international grocer only sells poblanos in multi-packs,
    >>> usually 3-6 poblanos; but, the price is only slightly more than a
    >>> single poblano is at the supermarket. Besides price, the
    >>> international grocer poblanos are better quality; no doubt because
    >>> they sell faster than at the supermarket.
    >>>
    >>> If I had a broader range of uses, I could always buy poblanos from
    >>> the international grocer and use them before they began their
    >>> decline.
    >>>
    >>> What are your favorite uses/recipes for poblano peppers?

    >>
    >> One of my favorite vegetables.
    >>
    >> Stuffed, the possibilities are endless. I like to use either chile
    >> verde (green sauce) or chile colorado (red sauce ) base plus
    >> proteins and/or veggies. Fire roasted peppers and onions with some
    >> grilled chicken, for example. Pork in most any form mixed with the
    >> chile verde. I often keep a puree of reconstituted chile anchos
    >> (dried poblanos!) which is a base for the chile colorado, and that
    >> base tastes great mixed with some cream cheese, crema or creme
    >> fraiche, and a mexican stye cheese melted in. I might finish them in
    >> the oven covered with one of the sauces and lots of cheese. Some
    >> roasted corn cut from the cob is good in the filling too. Corn,
    >> cream cheese, some chopped roasted sweet peppers, and some pureed
    >> chipotle in adobo is pretty tasty. Occasionally I even follow the
    >> strict relleno method and deep fry them with a thin tempura or maybe
    >> a cornstarch and egg batter. They can be filled with anything when
    >> fried. I like a combo filling of chorizo, ground beef, onions,
    >> chipotle, and cheese.
    >>
    >> Fire roasted and peeled they enhance any recipe where you would use
    >> roasted sweet peppers. I routinely use roasted chopped poblanos in
    >> chiles and stews. And the roasted ones can be minced or pureed and
    >> used in sauces. A poblano cream sauce will transform your chorizo
    >> and eggs or some grilled salmon.
    >>
    >> They are trickier to roast and peel than sweet bells because the
    >> flesh is thinner. It's best done quickly over high heat. And of
    >> course the fresher the better for roasting.
    >>
    >> And of course you can just roast, peel, and cut in strips, and serve
    >> them in sour cream or creme fraiche. Delicious.
    >>
    >> One thing I like is that they deliver a lot of hot pepper type of
    >> flavor with relatively little heat. So you can use quite a bit, use
    >> it freely, in dishes where you might need to be judicious if using
    >> only jalapenos or serranos. They also deliver much more flavor and a
    >> more nuanced flavor than anaheim/hatch/long green etc. type chiles.
    >> So where a recipe calls for diced green chiles, mine will often be
    >> diced poblanos.
    >>
    >> I still use anaheims, both fresh and canned. One thing I can't find
    >> is canned poblanos, in particular whole. I get whole anaheims canned
    >> at a hispanic neighborhood market, but while I know they exist, I
    >> never see canned poblanos around here at any kind of store.
    >>
    >> MartyB

    >
    > If I understand correctly, you are taking the poblanos and using the
    > idea of traditional stuffed peppers. . . except you are using more
    > traditionally Mexican food ingredients for the filling, and then
    > baking them covered with either red or green sauce? Yes?
    >
    > It makes sense, I just never thought of Poblanos that way. I can't
    > wait to try.
    > Thanks
    > Janet US


    That sums it up pretty well. They are a great vehicle for about any
    combination of Southwest or Mexican ingredients you can dream up.

    It works well in any combination of grilled veggies. I make empanadas with a
    filling of roasted corn, sweet and poblano peppers, onions, and tomatoes in
    cream cheese, cheese, chipotle puree, cumin, lime juice, and sour cream. The
    poblanos figure in prominently in the filling.

    MartyB


  13. #13
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    On Wednesday, January 23, 2013 7:39:36 PM UTC-6, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > l not -l <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > I still use anaheims, both fresh and canned. One thing I can't find is
    >
    > canned poblanos, in particular whole. I get whole anaheims canned at a
    >
    > hispanic neighborhood market, but while I know they exist, I never see
    >
    > canned poblanos around here at any kind of store.
    >

    Canned chilies are not very good. Fresh are best, followed by frozen.
    Even dried are better than canned. It's hard for me to believe that
    fresh poblanos are not available year-round in KC, as they are here.
    Fresh Anaheims are hit or miss, whereas frozen NuMex Big Jims are
    pretty consistent. That's why the Hatch, NM peppers get shipped frozen
    all over the country. IMO, the most thrilling chilies are homegrown Big
    Jims that are allowed to ripen on the plant, and used fresh. The flavor is
    less complex than dried reds, but there is a purity in their flavor that's
    like nothing else.
    >
    > MartyB


    --Bryan

  14. #14
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    On Thu, 24 Jan 2013 23:24:17 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Wed, 23 Jan 2013 19:39:36 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"

    >snip
    >>
    >> If I understand correctly, you are taking the poblanos and using the
    >> idea of traditional stuffed peppers. . . except you are using more
    >> traditionally Mexican food ingredients for the filling, and then
    >> baking them covered with either red or green sauce? Yes?
    >>
    >> It makes sense, I just never thought of Poblanos that way. I can't
    >> wait to try.
    >> Thanks
    >> Janet US

    >
    >That sums it up pretty well. They are a great vehicle for about any
    >combination of Southwest or Mexican ingredients you can dream up.
    >
    >It works well in any combination of grilled veggies. I make empanadas with a
    >filling of roasted corn, sweet and poblano peppers, onions, and tomatoes in
    >cream cheese, cheese, chipotle puree, cumin, lime juice, and sour cream. The
    >poblanos figure in prominently in the filling.
    >
    >MartyB

    Your empanadas sound delicious. I just had an email from friends who
    are vacationing in Mexico. They've discovered a new dish they like.
    chilis en nogada. Dish made with fresh pablano peppers and cactus in
    a sweet white sauce. That sounds really good too. Thanks for the
    ideas.
    Janet US

  15. #15
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    On Thu, 24 Jan 2013 21:44:29 -0800 (PST), Bryan
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Wednesday, January 23, 2013 7:39:36 PM UTC-6, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >> l not -l <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> I still use anaheims, both fresh and canned. One thing I can't find is
    >>
    >> canned poblanos, in particular whole. I get whole anaheims canned at a
    >>
    >> hispanic neighborhood market, but while I know they exist, I never see
    >>
    >> canned poblanos around here at any kind of store.
    >>

    >Canned chilies are not very good. Fresh are best, followed by frozen.
    >Even dried are better than canned. It's hard for me to believe that
    >fresh poblanos are not available year-round in KC, as they are here.
    >Fresh Anaheims are hit or miss, whereas frozen NuMex Big Jims are
    >pretty consistent. That's why the Hatch, NM peppers get shipped frozen
    >all over the country. IMO, the most thrilling chilies are homegrown Big
    >Jims that are allowed to ripen on the plant, and used fresh. The flavor is
    >less complex than dried reds, but there is a purity in their flavor that's
    >like nothing else.
    >>
    >> MartyB

    >
    >--Bryan

    I never see Hatch chilies here in southern Idaho, frozen or otherwise.
    Fresh anaheims are available year round here. My DIL sent me hatch
    chili seeds this year. I'm going to start them soon.
    I don't get the interest in NuMex Big Jims. I grew them last year as
    well as traditional Anaheims and couldn't discern much difference. We
    had a crappy summer, perhaps that affected the results.
    Janet US

  16. #16
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Thu, 24 Jan 2013 23:24:17 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 23 Jan 2013 19:39:36 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"

    >> snip
    >>>
    >>> If I understand correctly, you are taking the poblanos and using the
    >>> idea of traditional stuffed peppers. . . except you are using more
    >>> traditionally Mexican food ingredients for the filling, and then
    >>> baking them covered with either red or green sauce? Yes?
    >>>
    >>> It makes sense, I just never thought of Poblanos that way. I can't
    >>> wait to try.
    >>> Thanks
    >>> Janet US

    >>
    >> That sums it up pretty well. They are a great vehicle for about any
    >> combination of Southwest or Mexican ingredients you can dream up.
    >>
    >> It works well in any combination of grilled veggies. I make
    >> empanadas with a filling of roasted corn, sweet and poblano peppers,
    >> onions, and tomatoes in cream cheese, cheese, chipotle puree, cumin,
    >> lime juice, and sour cream. The poblanos figure in prominently in
    >> the filling.
    >>
    >> MartyB

    > Your empanadas sound delicious. I just had an email from friends who
    > are vacationing in Mexico. They've discovered a new dish they like.
    > chilis en nogada. Dish made with fresh pablano peppers and cactus in
    > a sweet white sauce. That sounds really good too. Thanks for the
    > ideas.
    > Janet US


    You're welcome. If your friends come up with a recipe or method for that
    dish, please post it.

    MartyB


  17. #17
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 08:54:04 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Osnip
    >> Your empanadas sound delicious. I just had an email from friends who
    >> are vacationing in Mexico. They've discovered a new dish they like.
    >> chilis en nogada. Dish made with fresh pablano peppers and cactus in
    >> a sweet white sauce. That sounds really good too. Thanks for the
    >> ideas.
    >> Janet US

    >
    >You're welcome. If your friends come up with a recipe or method for that
    >dish, please post it.
    >
    >MartyB


    Will do.
    Janet US

  18. #18
    jay Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    In article <kdotud$tga$[email protected]>, "l not -l" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Until recently I had only one use for poblanos; stuffed with egg,
    > chorizo and cheese. In fact, that is what I had for breakfast this
    > morning. However, recently I tried a poblano and corn soup recipe from
    > Pati's Mexican Table and liked it well enough to have periodically.
    >
    > The local international grocer only sells poblanos in multi-packs,
    > usually 3-6 poblanos; but, the price is only slightly more than a single
    > poblano is at the supermarket. Besides price, the international grocer
    > poblanos are better quality; no doubt because they sell faster than at
    > the supermarket.
    >
    > If I had a broader range of uses, I could always buy poblanos from the
    > international grocer and use them before they began their decline.
    >
    > What are your favorite uses/recipes for poblano peppers?


    I keep them in stock as most would have a bell pepper and use them
    anywhere bell pepper is used. My absolute favorite uses are chile
    relleno and rajas poblanos. Rajas, nice home made or hm style tortilla
    and a cold beer. Can't beat rajas for ease of preparation and so
    delicious!

    jay

  19. #19
    l not -l Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos


    On 25-Jan-2013, jay <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I keep them in stock as most would have a bell pepper and use them
    > anywhere bell pepper is used. My absolute favorite uses are chile
    > relleno and rajas poblanos. Rajas, nice home made or hm style tortilla
    >
    > and a cold beer. Can't beat rajas for ease of preparation and so
    > delicious!
    >
    > jay


    Rajas recipes I looked up sound like they might taste much like the
    poblano soup I made; the big difference appears to be diced poblanos vs
    strips and a bit more liquid to make soup than sauce. The soup was very
    good; the rajas sounds like a good alternative.
    --

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  20. #20
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Poblanos

    On Fri, 25 Jan 2013 17:05:31 GMT, "l not -l" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >On 25-Jan-2013, jay <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I keep them in stock as most would have a bell pepper and use them
    >> anywhere bell pepper is used. My absolute favorite uses are chile
    >> relleno and rajas poblanos. Rajas, nice home made or hm style tortilla
    >>
    >> and a cold beer. Can't beat rajas for ease of preparation and so
    >> delicious!
    >>
    >> jay

    >
    >Rajas recipes I looked up sound like they might taste much like the
    >poblano soup I made; the big difference appears to be diced poblanos vs
    >strips and a bit more liquid to make soup than sauce. The soup was very
    >good; the rajas sounds like a good alternative.


    You mean this? She recommends as a taco filling
    http://tinyurl.com/b5nzvtm
    Janet US

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32