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Thread: Po-Boys (sandwiches)

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Po-Boys (sandwiches)

    Because of the Superbowl they have been doing a special this week for
    New Orleans. Yesterday there was a thing about Po-Boys (sandwiches).
    I've heard of them, but never had one. After seeing that tv special,
    I've got the urge. They look a lot like Submarine Sandwiches, so I kind
    of wonder if it's just another name for almost the same thing.

    They said the originals were mostly gravy and a little meat scraps on a
    a special bread looking like a submarine sandwich bun, but they said the
    bread is unique to New Orleans. I guess all cooks have their secrets,
    but I bet someone has a recipe. That's what I'd like to find. Thye
    were originally called Poor-Boys, because they contained little solid
    fillings.

    The part I found a little screwed up, is that they are now made by
    trained chefs with all kinds of fancy ingredients. I'm sure they're
    good, but I'm looking more for the original recipe.

    Doing some web searching, I did not find any recipe for the bread, but
    did find lots of fillings that are all complicated and fancy. I'm not
    much of a cook, so they may not be as complicated as they seem, but I
    still dont think they are what they began as.

    Anyone have anything to add or recipes for the traditional or original
    Po-Boys? And the bread recipe?

    I doubt I'll ever get to New Orleans, but I would like to try the
    sandwich or something close to it. Then again, maybe those Sub
    Sandwiches I've eaten are about the same thing???



  2. #2
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Because of the Superbowl they have been doing a special this week for
    > New Orleans. Yesterday there was a thing about Po-Boys (sandwiches).
    > I've heard of them, but never had one. After seeing that tv special,
    > I've got the urge. They look a lot like Submarine Sandwiches, so I kind
    > of wonder if it's just another name for almost the same thing.
    >
    > They said the originals were mostly gravy and a little meat scraps on a
    > a special bread looking like a submarine sandwich bun, but they said the
    > bread is unique to New Orleans. I guess all cooks have their secrets,
    > but I bet someone has a recipe. That's what I'd like to find. Thye
    > were originally called Poor-Boys, because they contained little solid
    > fillings.
    >
    > The part I found a little screwed up, is that they are now made by
    > trained chefs with all kinds of fancy ingredients. I'm sure they're
    > good, but I'm looking more for the original recipe.
    >
    > Doing some web searching, I did not find any recipe for the bread, but
    > did find lots of fillings that are all complicated and fancy. I'm not
    > much of a cook, so they may not be as complicated as they seem, but I
    > still dont think they are what they began as.
    >
    > Anyone have anything to add or recipes for the traditional or original
    > Po-Boys? And the bread recipe?
    >
    > I doubt I'll ever get to New Orleans, but I would like to try the
    > sandwich or something close to it. Then again, maybe those Sub
    > Sandwiches I've eaten are about the same thing???


    I've only ever had the frozen ones. Not sure they still make those. They
    seemed like bologna and American cheese. But they were cheap.



  3. #3
    l not -l Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)


    On 1-Feb-2013, [email protected] wrote:

    > Anyone have anything to add or recipes for the traditional or original
    > Po-Boys? And the bread recipe?


    As mentioned in that TV show, the thing that really makes a Po' Boy is
    the bread and it is unlikely you'll be able to buy an equivalent. That
    said, there is a recipe online that can help you with the rest of the
    sandwich, then you can try bread from various bakeries (probably not
    supermarkets). For this recipe, and any NOLa recipe copycats, see the
    NOLa Cuisine blog.

    http://www.nolacuisine.com/2009/07/2...po-boy-recipe/

    --

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  4. #4
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)


    >> Anyone have anything to add or recipes for the traditional or original
    >> Po-Boys? And the bread recipe?

    >
    > As mentioned in that TV show, the thing that really makes a Po' Boy is
    > the bread and it is unlikely you'll be able to buy an equivalent. That
    > said, there is a recipe online that can help you with the rest of the
    > sandwich, then you can try bread from various bakeries (probably not
    > supermarkets). For this recipe, and any NOLa recipe copycats, see the
    > NOLa Cuisine blog.

    You're getting it right. We're having po'boys today. French bread from New
    Orleans with crab, good mayonnaise and Chachere's or Tabasco. Some will
    want cheese included, some not. The resident alien (from north Mississippi
    who doesn't know any better) will put catsup on his. My discovery in
    preparing the crab just right is a little bit of nutmeg. Never understood
    what nutmeg does for seafood but it is the difference between pretty good
    and wow. Polly


  5. #5
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)

    On Feb 1, 6:44*am, Janet Bostwick <nos...@cableone.net> wrote:
    > On Fri, 01 Feb 2013 06:16:03 -0600, norel...@no.com wrote:
    > >Because of the Superbowl they have been doing a special this week for
    > >New Orleans. *Yesterday there was a thing about Po-Boys (sandwiches).
    > >I've heard of them, but never had one. *After seeing that tv special,
    > >I've got the urge. *They look a lot like Submarine Sandwiches, so I kind
    > >of wonder if it's just another name for almost the same thing.

    >
    > >They said the originals were mostly gravy and a little meat scraps on a
    > >a special bread looking like a submarine sandwich bun, but they said the
    > >bread is unique to New Orleans. *I guess all cooks have their secrets,
    > >but I bet someone has a recipe. *That's what I'd like to find. *Thye
    > >were originally called Poor-Boys, because they contained little solid
    > >fillings.

    >
    > >The part I found a little screwed up, is that they are now made by
    > >trained chefs with all kinds of fancy ingredients. *I'm sure they're
    > >good, but I'm looking more for the original recipe.

    >
    > >Doing some web searching, I did not find any recipe for the bread, but
    > >did find lots of fillings that are all complicated and fancy. *I'm not
    > >much of a cook, so they may not be as complicated as they seem, but I
    > >still dont think they are what they began as.

    >
    > >Anyone have anything to add or recipes for the traditional or original
    > >Po-Boys? *And the bread recipe?

    >
    > >I doubt I'll ever get to New Orleans, but I would like to try the
    > >sandwich or something close to it. *Then again, maybe those Sub
    > >Sandwiches I've eaten are about the same thing???

    >
    > The bread is special. *I've never been able to duplicate it. *It's a
    > little like a baguette on the inside with a very thin, crispy outside.
    > Sub bread isn't going to do it.
    > Janet US


    This is THE po-boy loaf. I've never had bread like it since I moved
    away from New Orleans to the PNW.
    It's a good site for recipes as well.


  6. #6
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)

    On Feb 1, 4:16*am, norel...@no.com wrote:
    > Because of the Superbowl they have been doing a special this week for
    > New Orleans. *Yesterday there was a thing about Po-Boys (sandwiches).
    > I've heard of them, but never had one. *After seeing that tv special,
    > I've got the urge. *They look a lot like Submarine Sandwiches, so I kind
    > of wonder if it's just another name for almost the same thing.
    >
    > They said the originals were mostly gravy and a little meat scraps on a
    > a special bread looking like a submarine sandwich bun, but they said the
    > bread is unique to New Orleans. *I guess all cooks have their secrets,
    > but I bet someone has a recipe. *That's what I'd like to find. *Thye
    > were originally called Poor-Boys, because they contained little solid
    > fillings.
    >
    > The part I found a little screwed up, is that they are now made by
    > trained chefs with all kinds of fancy ingredients. *I'm sure they're
    > good, but I'm looking more for the original recipe.
    >
    > Doing some web searching, I did not find any recipe for the bread, but
    > did find lots of fillings that are all complicated and fancy. *I'm not
    > much of a cook, so they may not be as complicated as they seem, but I
    > still dont think they are what they began as.
    >
    > Anyone have anything to add or recipes for the traditional or original
    > Po-Boys? *And the bread recipe?
    >
    > I doubt I'll ever get to New Orleans, but I would like to try the
    > sandwich or something close to it. *Then again, maybe those Sub
    > Sandwiches I've eaten are about the same thing???


    Here's the actual history of the po-boy.

    http://www.leidenheimer.com/history_po.htm

  7. #7
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)

    On Fri, 1 Feb 2013 07:00:08 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Feb 1, 6:44*am, Janet Bostwick <nos...@cableone.net> wrote:
    >> On Fri, 01 Feb 2013 06:16:03 -0600, norel...@no.com wrote:
    >> >Because of the Superbowl they have been doing a special this week for
    >> >New Orleans. *Yesterday there was a thing about Po-Boys (sandwiches).
    >> >I've heard of them, but never had one. *After seeing that tv special,
    >> >I've got the urge. *They look a lot like Submarine Sandwiches, so I kind
    >> >of wonder if it's just another name for almost the same thing.

    >>
    >> >They said the originals were mostly gravy and a little meat scraps on a
    >> >a special bread looking like a submarine sandwich bun, but they said the
    >> >bread is unique to New Orleans. *I guess all cooks have their secrets,
    >> >but I bet someone has a recipe. *That's what I'd like to find. *Thye
    >> >were originally called Poor-Boys, because they contained little solid
    >> >fillings.

    >>
    >> >The part I found a little screwed up, is that they are now made by
    >> >trained chefs with all kinds of fancy ingredients. *I'm sure they're
    >> >good, but I'm looking more for the original recipe.

    >>
    >> >Doing some web searching, I did not find any recipe for the bread, but
    >> >did find lots of fillings that are all complicated and fancy. *I'm not
    >> >much of a cook, so they may not be as complicated as they seem, but I
    >> >still dont think they are what they began as.

    >>
    >> >Anyone have anything to add or recipes for the traditional or original
    >> >Po-Boys? *And the bread recipe?

    >>
    >> >I doubt I'll ever get to New Orleans, but I would like to try the
    >> >sandwich or something close to it. *Then again, maybe those Sub
    >> >Sandwiches I've eaten are about the same thing???

    >>
    >> The bread is special. *I've never been able to duplicate it. *It's a
    >> little like a baguette on the inside with a very thin, crispy outside.
    >> Sub bread isn't going to do it.
    >> Janet US

    >
    >This is THE po-boy loaf. I've never had bread like it since I moved
    >away from New Orleans to the PNW.
    >It's a good site for recipes as well.


    You stinker! Where's the link? Are you saying there is a recipe for
    the bread?
    Janet US

  8. #8
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)

    Janet wrote:

    > The bread is special. I've never been able to duplicate it. It's a
    > little like a baguette on the inside with a very thin, crispy outside. Sub
    > bread isn't going to do it.


    If you can find Cuban bread or Mexican bolillos, they might be closer to a
    po'-boy roll.

    Bob


  9. #9
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)

    On 2/1/2013 10:25 AM, Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > Janet wrote:
    >
    >> The bread is special. I've never been able to duplicate it. It's a
    >> little like a baguette on the inside with a very thin, crispy
    >> outside. Sub bread isn't going to do it.

    >
    > If you can find Cuban bread or Mexican bolillos, they might be closer
    > to a po'-boy roll.
    >
    > Bob

    Responding mainly to Janet. I wonder if the thin crispy baguette is
    obtained by removing the central bread as is done for a Vietnamese Banh
    Mi sandwich (which I much prefer to a Po Boy!)

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.


  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)

    On Fri, 01 Feb 2013 10:36:10 -0500, James Silverton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2/1/2013 10:25 AM, Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > > Janet wrote:
    > >
    > >> The bread is special. I've never been able to duplicate it. It's a
    > >> little like a baguette on the inside with a very thin, crispy
    > >> outside. Sub bread isn't going to do it.

    > >
    > > If you can find Cuban bread or Mexican bolillos, they might be closer
    > > to a po'-boy roll.
    > >
    > > Bob

    > Responding mainly to Janet. I wonder if the thin crispy baguette is
    > obtained by removing the central bread as is done for a Vietnamese Banh
    > Mi sandwich (which I much prefer to a Po Boy!)


    http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes..._boy_sandwich/

    She says: Do your utmost to find really good bread, with a crackling
    crust and soft interior. Ideally you would use a French sandwich loaf,
    like a baguette, but wider and about a foot long. Without good bread,
    a po boy is pretty po’.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  11. #11
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)


    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:510bde6f$0$52330$c3e8da3$[email protected] eb.com...
    > Janet wrote:
    >
    >> The bread is special. I've never been able to duplicate it. It's a
    >> little like a baguette on the inside with a very thin, crispy outside.
    >> Sub bread isn't going to do it.

    >
    > If you can find Cuban bread or Mexican bolillos, they might be closer to a
    > po'-boy roll.
    >
    > Bob


    How in the heck do you slice those things? I got Bolillos the other day and
    instead of slicing, they squished. I wound up stuffing my thumbs in the
    little slit I'd made and pulling them open.



  12. #12
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)


    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:kegnce$r8e$[email protected]..
    > Responding mainly to Janet. I wonder if the thin crispy baguette is
    > obtained by removing the central bread as is done for a Vietnamese Banh Mi
    > sandwich (which I much prefer to a Po Boy!)


    When Subway first opened here, that's what they did with their bread. I
    always wondered what they did with the stuff they pulled out.



  13. #13
    Brooklyn1 Guest

  14. #14
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)

    On Fri, 01 Feb 2013 08:13:01 -0700, Janet Bostwick <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Fri, 1 Feb 2013 07:00:08 -0800 (PST), ImStillMags
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Feb 1, 6:44*am, Janet Bostwick <nos...@cableone.net> wrote:
    >>> On Fri, 01 Feb 2013 06:16:03 -0600, norel...@no.com wrote:
    >>> >Because of the Superbowl they have been doing a special this week for
    >>> >New Orleans. *Yesterday there was a thing about Po-Boys (sandwiches).
    >>> >I've heard of them, but never had one. *After seeing that tv special,
    >>> >I've got the urge. *They look a lot like Submarine Sandwiches, so I kind
    >>> >of wonder if it's just another name for almost the same thing.
    >>>
    >>> >They said the originals were mostly gravy and a little meat scraps on a
    >>> >a special bread looking like a submarine sandwich bun, but they said the
    >>> >bread is unique to New Orleans. *I guess all cooks have their secrets,
    >>> >but I bet someone has a recipe. *That's what I'd like to find. *Thye
    >>> >were originally called Poor-Boys, because they contained little solid
    >>> >fillings.
    >>>
    >>> >The part I found a little screwed up, is that they are now made by
    >>> >trained chefs with all kinds of fancy ingredients. *I'm sure they're
    >>> >good, but I'm looking more for the original recipe.
    >>>
    >>> >Doing some web searching, I did not find any recipe for the bread, but
    >>> >did find lots of fillings that are all complicated and fancy. *I'm not
    >>> >much of a cook, so they may not be as complicated as they seem, but I
    >>> >still dont think they are what they began as.
    >>>
    >>> >Anyone have anything to add or recipes for the traditional or original
    >>> >Po-Boys? *And the bread recipe?
    >>>
    >>> >I doubt I'll ever get to New Orleans, but I would like to try the
    >>> >sandwich or something close to it. *Then again, maybe those Sub
    >>> >Sandwiches I've eaten are about the same thing???
    >>>
    >>> The bread is special. *I've never been able to duplicate it. *It's a
    >>> little like a baguette on the inside with a very thin, crispy outside.
    >>> Sub bread isn't going to do it.
    >>> Janet US

    >>
    >>This is THE po-boy loaf. I've never had bread like it since I moved
    >>away from New Orleans to the PNW.
    >>It's a good site for recipes as well.

    >
    >You stinker! Where's the link? Are you saying there is a recipe for
    >the bread?
    >Janet US


    I think she used invisible ink.....


    ------
    This message will self destruct in 30 seconds!

  15. #15
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)

    On Feb 1, 7:13*am, Janet Bostwick <nos...@cableone.net> wrote:

    >
    > >This is THE po-boy loaf. * I've never had bread like it since I moved
    > >away from New Orleans to the PNW.
    > >It's a good site for recipes as well.

    >
    > You stinker! *Where's the link? *Are you saying there is a recipe for
    > the bread?
    > Janet US



    Here is the best recipe for French bread that I have ever found. It is
    from a 1972 cookbook by Tony Chachere who later became famous for his
    Cajun seasoning. Tony is from Opelousas.

    HARD CRUST FRENCH BREAD

    2 1/2 cups warm water 2 teaspoons salt
    1 package dry yeast or 7 cups flour
    1 yeast cake 2 egg whites, well beaten
    2 tablespoons sugar

    In large bowl combine yeast, warm water, sugar and salt: stir until
    dissolved.
    Gradually add sifted flour and mix until well blended.
    Knead 10 minutes on well-floured surface un*til dough is smooth and
    satiny.
    Let rise in warm place until doubled in bulk. Punch down and place on
    floured surface.
    Knead 3 or 4 times to remove air and divide into 4 equal pieces.
    Shape into loaves, place in well-greased pans.
    Slash tops and brush with egg whites.
    Let rise until double in bulk and bake 15 minutes in pre-heated 450-
    degree oven or 30 minutes at 350 degrees.

    Remove from pans and cool. (Makes 4 loaves)

    NOTE: Wrap extra loaves in aluminum foil and freeze. To re*serve, warm
    in foil 20 minutes at 350 degrees.

    This is about as close to Leidenheimers as you will ever get.







  16. #16
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)

    ImStillMags wrote:
    >
    >Here is the best recipe for French bread that I have ever found. It is
    >from a 1972 cookbook by Tony Chachere who later became famous for his
    >Cajun seasoning. Tony is from Opelousas.
    >
    >HARD CRUST FRENCH BREAD
    >
    >2 1/2 cups warm water 2 teaspoons salt
    >1 package dry yeast or 7 cups flour
    >1 yeast cake 2 egg whites, well beaten
    >2 tablespoons sugar


    Hmmm, 1 package dry yeast OR 7 cups flour?

    And if it calls for 1 package dry yeast WTF would it also call for 1
    yeast cake... there are other things that don't gibe... I think this
    is an EFed up recipe... but then every time I see the word "French" in
    a recipe I KNOW it's EFed up. The three things the French don't do
    well is cook, bathe, and shave.

    >In large bowl combine yeast, warm water, sugar and salt: stir until
    >dissolved.
    >Gradually add sifted flour and mix until well blended.
    >Knead 10 minutes on well-floured surface un*til dough is smooth and
    >satiny.
    >Let rise in warm place until doubled in bulk. Punch down and place on
    >floured surface.
    >Knead 3 or 4 times to remove air and divide into 4 equal pieces.
    >Shape into loaves, place in well-greased pans.
    >Slash tops and brush with egg whites.
    >Let rise until double in bulk and bake 15 minutes in pre-heated 450-
    >degree oven or 30 minutes at 350 degrees.
    >
    > Remove from pans and cool. (Makes 4 loaves)
    >
    >NOTE: Wrap extra loaves in aluminum foil and freeze. To re*serve, warm
    >in foil 20 minutes at 350 degrees.
    >
    >This is about as close to Leidenheimers as you will ever get.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >


  17. #17
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)

    On 2013-02-01, ImStillMags <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Here is the best recipe for French bread that I have ever found. It is
    > from a 1972 cookbook by Tony Chachere who later became famous for his
    > Cajun seasoning. Tony is from Opelousas.
    >
    > HARD CRUST FRENCH BREAD
    >
    > 2 1/2 cups warm water 2 teaspoons salt
    > 1 package dry yeast or 7 cups flour
    > 1 yeast cake 2 egg whites, well beaten
    > 2 tablespoons sugar


    I'm not sure what happened, but this recipe is ridiculous.

    What? I don't need 7 C flour if I have 1 pkg dry yeast?

    I mix the yeast cake with the egg whites? Which yeast mixed with
    water, the 1 pkg or the 1 cake? Who has a mixer of even the counter
    space to deal with 7 C flour!?

    Sorry, but I doubt anyone here has commercial kitchen facilities or
    the need to make 4 loaves of bread. You continue to post these
    restaurant sized recipes which are near useless to most folks in this
    group. Wanna try this one again? I bet it's really good, but with the
    recipe above, as written, who will ever know.

    nb

  18. #18
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)

    On 1 Feb 2013 20:24:42 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2013-02-01, ImStillMags <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Here is the best recipe for French bread that I have ever found. It is
    >> from a 1972 cookbook by Tony Chachere who later became famous for his
    >> Cajun seasoning. Tony is from Opelousas.
    >>
    >> HARD CRUST FRENCH BREAD
    >>
    >> 2 1/2 cups warm water 2 teaspoons salt
    >> 1 package dry yeast or 7 cups flour
    >> 1 yeast cake 2 egg whites, well beaten
    >> 2 tablespoons sugar

    >
    >I'm not sure what happened, but this recipe is ridiculous.
    >
    >What? I don't need 7 C flour if I have 1 pkg dry yeast?
    >
    >I mix the yeast cake with the egg whites? Which yeast mixed with
    >water, the 1 pkg or the 1 cake? Who has a mixer of even the counter
    >space to deal with 7 C flour!?
    >
    >Sorry, but I doubt anyone here has commercial kitchen facilities or
    >the need to make 4 loaves of bread. You continue to post these
    >restaurant sized recipes which are near useless to most folks in this
    >group. Wanna try this one again? I bet it's really good, but with the
    >recipe above, as written, who will ever know.
    >
    >nb


    7 cups of flour (about 2 pounds) makes only two average/smallish sized
    loaves, not anywhere near a commercial sized recipe... I wouldn't
    light my oven for less than two loaves. I'd worry more about that
    flour *OR* yeast.

  19. #19
    l not -l Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)


    On 1-Feb-2013, James Silverton <[email protected]> wrote:

    > User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:17.0)
    > Gecko/20130107 Thunderbird/17.0.2
    > In-Reply-To: <510bde6f$0$52330$c3e8da3$92d0a893@new[email protected] om>
    > Cancel-Lock: sha1:aaDYDLPzmqtgXCtPGz/+AsZ4MnY=
    >
    > On 2/1/2013 10:25 AM, Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > > Janet wrote:
    > >
    > >> The bread is special. I've never been able to duplicate it. It's
    > >> a
    > >> little like a baguette on the inside with a very thin, crispy
    > >> outside. Sub bread isn't going to do it.

    > >
    > > If you can find Cuban bread or Mexican bolillos, they might be
    > > closer
    > > to a po'-boy roll.
    > >
    > > Bob

    > Responding mainly to Janet. I wonder if the thin crispy baguette is
    > obtained by removing the central bread as is done for a Vietnamese
    > Banh
    > Mi sandwich (which I much prefer to a Po Boy!)
    >
    > --
    > Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Having eaten a bunch of New Orleans Po' Boy sandwiches over my many
    visits there, I can say for certain that nothing was ever removed from
    the loaf. NOLa is a city of excesses, you always add to, never
    take-away 8-)

    Just like SF sourdough is unique to its environment, NOLa bread is
    unique due to its environment. The secret to NOLa bread is baking in a
    high-humidity environment.
    --

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  20. #20
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Po-Boys (sandwiches)

    On 2/1/2013 4:17 PM, l not -l wrote:
    > On 1-Feb-2013, James Silverton <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:17.0)
    >> Gecko/20130107 Thunderbird/17.0.2
    >> In-Reply-To: <510bde6f$0$52330$c3e8da3$[email protected] om>
    >> Cancel-Lock: sha1:aaDYDLPzmqtgXCtPGz/+AsZ4MnY=
    >>
    >> On 2/1/2013 10:25 AM, Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    >>> Janet wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> The bread is special. I've never been able to duplicate it. It's
    >>>> a
    >>>> little like a baguette on the inside with a very thin, crispy
    >>>> outside. Sub bread isn't going to do it.
    >>> If you can find Cuban bread or Mexican bolillos, they might be
    >>> closer
    >>> to a po'-boy roll.
    >>>
    >>> Bob

    >> Responding mainly to Janet. I wonder if the thin crispy baguette is
    >> obtained by removing the central bread as is done for a Vietnamese
    >> Banh
    >> Mi sandwich (which I much prefer to a Po Boy!)
    >>
    >> --
    >> Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    > Having eaten a bunch of New Orleans Po' Boy sandwiches over my many
    > visits there, I can say for certain that nothing was ever removed from
    > the loaf. NOLa is a city of excesses, you always add to, never
    > take-away 8-)
    >
    > Just like SF sourdough is unique to its environment, NOLa bread is
    > unique due to its environment. The secret to NOLa bread is baking in a
    > high-humidity environment.

    I was really just musing in print. I've been to New Orleans, a
    fascinating place with an unpleasant climate, but I've never had a Po
    Boy there.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.


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