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Thread: The plan. Let's see how it turns out...

  1. #1
    phaeton Guest

    Default The plan. Let's see how it turns out...

    Speaking of beans...

    I've got the taste for a savory bean stew type of meal. Here's what I
    plan on starting with:

    1) Soak a pound of pinto beans in water overnight. Rinse, boil, rinse
    etc as necessary.

    2) Saute in olive oil the following, in batches if necessary: 1 white
    onion (chopped), 1 green bell pepper (chopped) and 3 or 4 cloves of
    garlic (chopped)

    3) Throw onion, pepper and garlic into a stock pot. Add about 1.5
    cups of merlot or burgundy wine.

    4) Brown about a pound of bulk sausage (or sausage links with the skin
    cut off and the contents spread out into a pan). I can't decide
    between bratwurst, chorizo or andouille, or even just plain ground
    pork. Drain fat, and put into stock pot.

    5) Bring stockpot contents to a boil, then reduce heat, simmer with
    the lid on for about 20 minutes to allow the vegetables to 'juice
    out'.

    6) Add beans to stock pot. Add enough chicken broth to get the liquid
    level up to the top layer of beans.

    7) Bring it all to a boil again, then reduce heat, put the lid on and
    simmer for another 40 minutes to an hour.

    8) Serve with a crusty wheat bread or brown rice.


    A little much for this time of year, perhaps, but it sounds good to
    me. If this were you, how would you do it? What would you add,
    subtract, or change?

    Thanks.

    -J



  2. #2
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: The plan. Let's see how it turns out...

    phaeton <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Speaking of beans...


    >I've got the taste for a savory bean stew type of meal. Here's what I
    >plan on starting with:
    >
    >1) Soak a pound of pinto beans in water overnight. Rinse, boil, rinse
    >etc as necessary.
    >
    >2) Saute in olive oil the following, in batches if necessary: 1 white
    >onion (chopped), 1 green bell pepper (chopped) and 3 or 4 cloves of
    >garlic (chopped)
    >
    >3) Throw onion, pepper and garlic into a stock pot. Add about 1.5
    >cups of merlot or burgundy wine.
    >
    >4) Brown about a pound of bulk sausage (or sausage links with the skin
    >cut off and the contents spread out into a pan). I can't decide
    >between bratwurst, chorizo or andouille, or even just plain ground
    >pork. Drain fat, and put into stock pot.
    >
    >5) Bring stockpot contents to a boil, then reduce heat, simmer with
    >the lid on for about 20 minutes to allow the vegetables to 'juice
    >out'.
    >
    >6) Add beans to stock pot. Add enough chicken broth to get the liquid
    >level up to the top layer of beans.
    >
    >7) Bring it all to a boil again, then reduce heat, put the lid on and
    >simmer for another 40 minutes to an hour.
    >
    >8) Serve with a crusty wheat bread or brown rice.
    >
    >
    >A little much for this time of year, perhaps, but it sounds good to
    >me. If this were you, how would you do it? What would you add,
    >subtract, or change?


    Sounds great. The proportion of wine seems high. You may not
    wish to commit to the entire amount of wine early in the
    recipe, before tasting. The proportion of onion/green pepper seems low.
    It's not clear how much chicken stock you would end up using but you
    don't want it too broth-y. (At least, I wouldn't want it to be.)
    The proportion of sausage is possibly more than you need, depending
    on preferences.


    Steve

  3. #3
    phaeton Guest

    Default Re: The plan. Let's see how it turns out...

    On Jul 20, 1:07*am, spop...@speedymail.org (Steve Pope) wrote:
    > phaeton *<blahbleh...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > >Speaking of beans...
    > >I've got the taste for a savory bean stew type of meal. *Here's what I
    > >plan on starting with:

    >
    > >1) Soak a pound of pinto beans in water overnight. *Rinse, boil, rinse
    > >etc as necessary.

    >
    > >2) Saute in olive oil the following, in batches if necessary: 1 white
    > >onion (chopped), 1 green bell pepper (chopped) and 3 or 4 cloves of
    > >garlic (chopped)

    >
    > >3) Throw onion, pepper and garlic into a stock pot. *Add about 1.5
    > >cups of merlot or burgundy wine.

    >
    > >4) Brown about a pound of bulk sausage (or sausage links with the skin
    > >cut off and the contents spread out into a pan). *I can't decide
    > >between bratwurst, chorizo or andouille, or even just plain ground
    > >pork. *Drain fat, and put into stock pot.

    >
    > >5) Bring stockpot contents to a boil, then reduce heat, simmer with
    > >the lid on for about 20 minutes to allow the vegetables to 'juice
    > >out'.

    >
    > >6) Add beans to stock pot. *Add enough chicken broth to get the liquid
    > >level up to the top layer of beans.

    >
    > >7) Bring it all to a boil again, then reduce heat, put the lid on and
    > >simmer for another 40 minutes to an hour.

    >
    > >8) *Serve with a crusty wheat bread or brown rice.

    >
    > >A little much for this time of year, perhaps, but it sounds good to
    > >me. *If this were you, how would you do it? *What would you add,
    > >subtract, or change?

    >
    > Sounds great. *The proportion of wine seems high. * You may not
    > wish to commit to the entire amount of wine early in the
    > recipe, before tasting. *The proportion of onion/green pepper seems low.. *
    > It's not clear how much chicken stock you would end up using but you
    > don't want it too broth-y. *(At least, I wouldn't want it to be.)
    > The proportion of sausage is possibly more than you need, depending
    > on preferences.
    >
    > Steve


    This is exactly the thing I'm not real sure on- the proportioning.

    And no, I don't want it too brothy. I don't want a soup, i want a
    stew, or thicker. The sausage is more for flavoring, I suppose.
    There is no harm in the added protein, but this is a bean dish, after
    all.

    What's a good quantity of wine and onion/green pepper to start with?

    Thanks

    -J

  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: The plan. Let's see how it turns out...

    On Wed, 20 Jul 2011 06:07:50 +0000 (UTC), [email protected]
    (Steve Pope) wrote:

    > Sounds great. The proportion of wine seems high. You may not
    > wish to commit to the entire amount of wine early in the
    > recipe, before tasting. The proportion of onion/green pepper seems low.
    > It's not clear how much chicken stock you would end up using but you
    > don't want it too broth-y. (At least, I wouldn't want it to be.)
    > The proportion of sausage is possibly more than you need, depending
    > on preferences.


    My thoughts were different. I would choose mexican chorizo for the
    pintos and no wine, alcohol isn't absolutely necessary - but if I used
    any it would be beer. I also don't know how well cooked the beans are
    supposed to be when the rest of the cooking starts to happen, but
    bringing the liquid to the top of the beans is a minimum amount AFAIC.
    If the bean mixture is the way he wants at the end of the cooking time
    and it's too brothy, he can always remove the beans and boil down the
    liquid. If it was me, the beans would probably need more liquid
    because I like my beans really cooked. I don't want every bean to be
    whole.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  5. #5
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: The plan. Let's see how it turns out...


    "Steve Pope" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j05rbm$jur$[email protected]..
    > phaeton <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Speaking of beans...

    >
    >>I've got the taste for a savory bean stew type of meal. Here's what I
    >>plan on starting with:
    >>
    >>1) Soak a pound of pinto beans in water overnight. Rinse, boil, rinse
    >>etc as necessary.
    >>
    >>2) Saute in olive oil the following, in batches if necessary: 1 white
    >>onion (chopped), 1 green bell pepper (chopped) and 3 or 4 cloves of
    >>garlic (chopped)
    >>
    >>3) Throw onion, pepper and garlic into a stock pot. Add about 1.5
    >>cups of merlot or burgundy wine.
    >>
    >>4) Brown about a pound of bulk sausage (or sausage links with the skin
    >>cut off and the contents spread out into a pan). I can't decide
    >>between bratwurst, chorizo or andouille, or even just plain ground
    >>pork. Drain fat, and put into stock pot.
    >>
    >>5) Bring stockpot contents to a boil, then reduce heat, simmer with
    >>the lid on for about 20 minutes to allow the vegetables to 'juice
    >>out'.
    >>
    >>6) Add beans to stock pot. Add enough chicken broth to get the liquid
    >>level up to the top layer of beans.
    >>
    >>7) Bring it all to a boil again, then reduce heat, put the lid on and
    >>simmer for another 40 minutes to an hour.
    >>
    >>8) Serve with a crusty wheat bread or brown rice.
    >>
    >>
    >>A little much for this time of year, perhaps, but it sounds good to
    >>me. If this were you, how would you do it? What would you add,
    >>subtract, or change?

    >
    > Sounds great. The proportion of wine seems high. You may not
    > wish to commit to the entire amount of wine early in the
    > recipe, before tasting. The proportion of onion/green pepper seems low.
    > It's not clear how much chicken stock you would end up using but you
    > don't want it too broth-y. (At least, I wouldn't want it to be.)
    > The proportion of sausage is possibly more than you need, depending
    > on preferences.
    >
    >
    > Steve


    Beans and wine aren't a good combination. At least, not cooking them
    together. And certainly not merlot or burgundy! Way too heavy. Bean soup
    doesn't need that. If I were going to make pinto bean soup I'd lean towards
    a simple bean with bacon

    But if the OP wants to add sausage I'd go for the andoulle before I'd use
    chorizo, but that's just me. And I certainly wouldn't take the skin off;
    just slice it into rounds and brown it before tossing it in the soup.

    Mexican chorizo is too greasy. Go for the Portguese type of sausage if you
    want chorizo (aka chourico). Or use linguica.

    One of my favourite sites is Gaspar's:

    http://www.gasparssausage.com/

    Jill


  6. #6
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: The plan. Let's see how it turns out...

    i would use vegetable broth instead of chicken, and i would just slice the
    sausages if using the links cutting as thin as possible, Lee
    "phaeton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Speaking of beans...
    >
    > I've got the taste for a savory bean stew type of meal. Here's what I
    > plan on starting with:
    >
    > 1) Soak a pound of pinto beans in water overnight. Rinse, boil, rinse
    > etc as necessary.
    >
    > 2) Saute in olive oil the following, in batches if necessary: 1 white
    > onion (chopped), 1 green bell pepper (chopped) and 3 or 4 cloves of
    > garlic (chopped)
    >
    > 3) Throw onion, pepper and garlic into a stock pot. Add about 1.5
    > cups of merlot or burgundy wine.
    >
    > 4) Brown about a pound of bulk sausage (or sausage links with the skin
    > cut off and the contents spread out into a pan). I can't decide
    > between bratwurst, chorizo or andouille, or even just plain ground
    > pork. Drain fat, and put into stock pot.
    >
    > 5) Bring stockpot contents to a boil, then reduce heat, simmer with
    > the lid on for about 20 minutes to allow the vegetables to 'juice
    > out'.
    >
    > 6) Add beans to stock pot. Add enough chicken broth to get the liquid
    > level up to the top layer of beans.
    >
    > 7) Bring it all to a boil again, then reduce heat, put the lid on and
    > simmer for another 40 minutes to an hour.
    >
    > 8) Serve with a crusty wheat bread or brown rice.
    >
    >
    > A little much for this time of year, perhaps, but it sounds good to
    > me. If this were you, how would you do it? What would you add,
    > subtract, or change?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > -J
    >
    >




  7. #7
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: The plan. Let's see how it turns out...

    phaeton <[email protected]> wrote:

    >What's a good quantity of wine and onion/green pepper to start with?


    I typically use 2 each onion / green pepper per dried pound of beans.

    The wine... hard to say, I tend to use crushed tomatoes, and then
    just a quarter cup or so of wine if I include it. But you're
    going for a different effect. I'm interested to learn how the
    wine-based approach works out.


    Steve

  8. #8
    Ema Nymton Guest

    Default Re: The plan. Let's see how it turns out...

    On 7/20/2011 12:48 AM, phaeton wrote:
    > Speaking of beans...
    >
    > I've got the taste for a savory bean stew type of meal. Here's what I
    > plan on starting with:
    >
    > 1) Soak a pound of pinto beans in water overnight. Rinse, boil, rinse
    > etc as necessary.
    >
    > 2) Saute in olive oil the following, in batches if necessary: 1 white
    > onion (chopped), 1 green bell pepper (chopped) and 3 or 4 cloves of
    > garlic (chopped)
    >
    > 3) Throw onion, pepper and garlic into a stock pot. Add about 1.5
    > cups of merlot or burgundy wine.
    >
    > 4) Brown about a pound of bulk sausage (or sausage links with the skin
    > cut off and the contents spread out into a pan). I can't decide
    > between bratwurst, chorizo or andouille, or even just plain ground
    > pork. Drain fat, and put into stock pot.
    >
    > 5) Bring stockpot contents to a boil, then reduce heat, simmer with
    > the lid on for about 20 minutes to allow the vegetables to 'juice
    > out'.
    >
    > 6) Add beans to stock pot. Add enough chicken broth to get the liquid
    > level up to the top layer of beans.
    >
    > 7) Bring it all to a boil again, then reduce heat, put the lid on and
    > simmer for another 40 minutes to an hour.
    >
    > 8) Serve with a crusty wheat bread or brown rice.
    >
    >
    > A little much for this time of year, perhaps, but it sounds good to
    > me. If this were you, how would you do it? What would you add,
    > subtract, or change?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > -J


    Let us know how it turns out. BTW, I don't soak pinto beans over
    night. I rinse the beans then cook them. You could saute your onions,
    peppers, garlic and sausage, then add the beans and water to the pot. I
    would skip the wine and add bacon fat instead. Again, let us know how
    this turns out.

    Becca

  9. #9
    Ranee at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: The plan. Let's see how it turns out...

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Wed, 20 Jul 2011 06:07:50 +0000 (UTC), [email protected]
    > (Steve Pope) wrote:
    >
    > > Sounds great. The proportion of wine seems high. You may not
    > > wish to commit to the entire amount of wine early in the
    > > recipe, before tasting. The proportion of onion/green pepper seems low.
    > > It's not clear how much chicken stock you would end up using but you
    > > don't want it too broth-y. (At least, I wouldn't want it to be.)
    > > The proportion of sausage is possibly more than you need, depending
    > > on preferences.

    >
    > My thoughts were different. I would choose mexican chorizo for the
    > pintos and no wine, alcohol isn't absolutely necessary - but if I used
    > any it would be beer. I also don't know how well cooked the beans are
    > supposed to be when the rest of the cooking starts to happen, but
    > bringing the liquid to the top of the beans is a minimum amount AFAIC.
    > If the bean mixture is the way he wants at the end of the cooking time
    > and it's too brothy, he can always remove the beans and boil down the
    > liquid. If it was me, the beans would probably need more liquid
    > because I like my beans really cooked. I don't want every bean to be
    > whole.


    I would use the Mexican chorizo, and use it to cook the other
    vegetables, too. I'd add tequila instead of wine, but toward the end of
    the cooking. I'd also toss in some sliced jalapeno at the end.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  10. #10
    phaeton Guest

    Default Re: The plan. Let's see how it turns out...

    Thanks for the feedback, folks.

    I wasn't sure on the wine either, (it's in a lot of beef stews, and i
    saw it in a couple of bean stuff online, but you know how online
    recipes go). After reading this far, I'm going to skip it entirely.

    Vegetable stock insteaf of chicken stock... sure, why not?

    I was also debating on crumbling the sausage vs. cutting chunks. I'm
    not interested in bacon this time around because I want something
    fairly meaty but not so salty. But I like bacon + beans in other
    instances too.

    The reason I'm cooking the beans separate is because that's how I've
    always done it. I've never been able to find a definitive guide on
    which beans have toxins and which ones don't.

    Once it is all together, I would almost be interested in simmering it
    for much longer, say a few hours. I almost want the beans to
    disintegrate a little and thicken the liquids. I think this is what
    sf was referring to.

    Also, note that I haven't added any spices to this directly. With the
    aromatics, sausage and stock, I doubt it's really necessary.

    Thanks again for the comments- past, present, and future!

    -J

  11. #11
    Gene Williams Guest

    Default Re: The plan. Let's see how it turns out...


    "Ema Nymton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On 7/20/2011 12:48 AM, phaeton wrote:
    >> Speaking of beans...
    >>
    >> I've got the taste for a savory bean stew type of meal. Here's what I
    >> plan on starting with:
    >>
    >> 1) Soak a pound of pinto beans in water overnight. Rinse, boil, rinse
    >> etc as necessary.
    >>
    >> 2) Saute in olive oil the following, in batches if necessary: 1 white
    >> onion (chopped), 1 green bell pepper (chopped) and 3 or 4 cloves of
    >> garlic (chopped)
    >>
    >> 3) Throw onion, pepper and garlic into a stock pot. Add about 1.5
    >> cups of merlot or burgundy wine.
    >>
    >> 4) Brown about a pound of bulk sausage (or sausage links with the skin
    >> cut off and the contents spread out into a pan). I can't decide
    >> between bratwurst, chorizo or andouille, or even just plain ground
    >> pork. Drain fat, and put into stock pot.
    >>
    >> 5) Bring stockpot contents to a boil, then reduce heat, simmer with
    >> the lid on for about 20 minutes to allow the vegetables to 'juice
    >> out'.
    >>
    >> 6) Add beans to stock pot. Add enough chicken broth to get the liquid
    >> level up to the top layer of beans.
    >>
    >> 7) Bring it all to a boil again, then reduce heat, put the lid on and
    >> simmer for another 40 minutes to an hour.
    >>
    >> 8) Serve with a crusty wheat bread or brown rice.
    >>
    >>
    >> A little much for this time of year, perhaps, but it sounds good to
    >> me. If this were you, how would you do it? What would you add,
    >> subtract, or change?
    >>
    >> Thanks.
    >>
    >> -J

    >
    > Let us know how it turns out. BTW, I don't soak pinto beans over night.
    > I rinse the beans then cook them. You could saute your onions, peppers,
    > garlic and sausage, then add the beans and water to the pot. I would skip
    > the wine and add bacon fat instead. Again, let us know how this turns
    > out.
    >
    > Becca


    De-lurking for a purpose. I don't know where I got this recipe but it's a
    work in progress for the last year or so. I soak my beans over night and
    rinse them 3 or 4 times before cooking. I also use a pressure cooker
    initially and then into a crock pot for a few hours. I don't think that I
    would use wine, maybe beer. As I said it's a work in progress but the couple
    of times I've made it, it turned out pretty good. As Becca said let us know.

    Name: Pinto Beans with Kielbasa
    Serves: 8
    Ingredients: 1 large onion, chopped
    1 medium green bell pepper,chopped
    1 tablespoon olive or canola oil
    1-1/2 pounds kielbasa, cut into I-inch pieces
    1 cup great northern beans, cooked and drained
    1 cup pinto beans, cooked and drained
    1 (14.5 oz.) can stewed tomatoes
    1 (10 oz.) can diced tomatoes and green chilies
    I (8 oz.) can tomato sauce
    1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
    1/2 teaspoon pepper

    Instructions: In a Dutch oven, sauté the onion and green pepper in oil until
    tender. Add the remaining ingredients; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover
    and simmer until heated through.


  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: The plan. Let's see how it turns out...

    On Wed, 20 Jul 2011 10:23:12 -0700 (PDT), phaeton
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Once it is all together, I would almost be interested in simmering it
    > for much longer, say a few hours. I almost want the beans to
    > disintegrate a little and thicken the liquids. I think this is what
    > sf was referring to.


    Yes!
    >
    > Also, note that I haven't added any spices to this directly. With the
    > aromatics, sausage and stock, I doubt it's really necessary.


    I've forgotten if you plan to add salt.... I think you'll need salt at
    the very least. If you add more than s&p, don't put them in until the
    last 30-60 minutes.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  13. #13
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: The plan. Let's see how it turns out...

    Jill wrote:

    > Beans and wine aren't a good combination. At least, not cooking them
    > together.


    Blanket statements are always wrong.

    Bob



  14. #14
    phaeton Guest

    Default Re: The plan. Let's see how it turns out...

    Sorry for the lack of a proper newsreader in this thread. Anyways...

    Based upon suggestions here, here's what I did:

    1) soaked a pound of pintos overnight in water.
    2) boiled said pintos for about 15 minutes in water.
    3) drained said pintos, then added them to a stock pot which included
    the following:

    a) 2 white onions, diced and sauteed in veg oil (i was out of olive)
    b) 2 green bell peppers, diced and sauteed in veg oil
    c) 3 cloves of garlic. I had purchased 5, but the last 2 had
    sprouted, so I planted them in in my garden instead.
    d) about 1.5 pounds of mild italian sausage, cut into chunks and
    browned on both sides as recommended here.
    e) One 15oz can of reduced sodium chicken stock.

    Then let it all simmer together for about an hour. The result?
    Wonderful! I didn't add any salt- I tend to not add salt ot
    anything. Others might do it differently.

    It's very mild, kinda sweet (from the peppers and basil from the
    sausage, i presume) and certainly very 'homey' tasting. It's one of
    those things that would right your stomach if it were upset. I can
    also see it as a starting point for other things. I.e., a spicy
    sausage instead of a mild italian. Or bacon as was mentioned
    earlier. Or even chorizo (like I originally stated. Maybe beef stock
    instead of chicken to richen it up.

    All in all, it's pretty good. Probably too bland for most folks, but -
    I- like it.

    Thanks everyone.

    -J

  15. #15
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Re: The plan. Let's see how it turns out...

    On Jul 25, 2:44*am, phaeton <blahbleh...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > Sorry for the lack of a proper newsreader in this thread. *Anyways...
    >
    > Based upon suggestions here, here's what I did:
    >
    > 1) soaked a pound of pintos overnight in water.
    > 2) boiled said pintos for about 15 minutes in water.
    > 3) drained said pintos, then added them to a stock pot which included
    > the following:
    >
    > a) 2 white onions, diced and sauteed in veg oil (i was out of olive)
    > b) 2 green bell peppers, diced and sauteed in veg oil
    > c) 3 cloves of garlic. *I had purchased 5, but the last 2 had
    > sprouted, so I planted them in in my garden instead.
    > d) about 1.5 pounds of mild italian sausage, cut into chunks and
    > browned on both sides as recommended here.
    > e) One 15oz can of reduced sodium chicken stock.
    >
    > Then let it all simmer together for about an hour. *The result?
    > Wonderful! *I didn't add any salt- I tend to not add salt ot
    > anything. *Others might do it differently.
    >
    > It's very mild, kinda sweet (from the peppers and basil from the
    > sausage, i presume) and certainly very 'homey' tasting. *It's one of
    > those things that would right your stomach if it were upset. *I can
    > also see it as a starting point for other things. *I.e., a spicy
    > sausage instead of a mild italian. *Or bacon as was mentioned
    > earlier. *Or even chorizo (like I originally stated. *Maybe beef stock
    > instead of chicken to richen it up.
    >
    > All in all, it's pretty good. *Probably too bland for most folks, but -
    > I- like it. *
    >
    > Thanks everyone.


    Don't thank me; I thank you. I'll add it to my repertoire. I just
    wanted to let you know that sprouted garlic retains its flavor. If you
    dont't want to eat the sprouts, they are easily separated by cutting
    the cloves lengthwise.

    Jerry
    --
    Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can
    get.

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