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Thread: Pizza Dough Question

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Pizza Dough Question

    I make my own pizza dough, but it never turns out like the local pizza
    shop where I go. (Mineo's if you live in Pittsburgh Pa). I have tried
    lots of different flours, all purpose, bread, and so forth. Is the
    stretcheness of the dough related to the type of flour? I enjoy my
    toppings, but I still like the pizza shops dough better. My crust
    tends to be crunchy, rather than solid.

    Thanks

    Tom

  2. #2
    piedmont Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question

    On 2/12/2010 5:47 PM, [email protected] wrote:
    > I make my own pizza dough, but it never turns out like the local pizza
    > shop where I go. (Mineo's if you live in Pittsburgh Pa). I have tried
    > lots of different flours, all purpose, bread, and so forth. Is the
    > stretcheness of the dough related to the type of flour? I enjoy my
    > toppings, but I still like the pizza shops dough better. My crust
    > tends to be crunchy, rather than solid.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Tom

    Recipes and directions here,

    http://www.cascadetek.com/lab-oven/T...orced-Air-Oven

    I use the, dough or pizza dough cycle on my bread machine.

    mike
    --
    piedmont, The Practical BBQ'r

    http://sites.google.com/site/thepracticalbbqr/

    (mawil55)

  3. #3
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I make my own pizza dough, but it never turns out like the local pizza
    > shop where I go. (Mineo's if you live in Pittsburgh Pa). I have tried
    > lots of different flours, all purpose, bread, and so forth. Is the
    > stretcheness of the dough related to the type of flour? I enjoy my
    > toppings, but I still like the pizza shops dough better. My crust
    > tends to be crunchy, rather than solid.


    The best results, IMO, come from an overnight rise in the fridge.
    Then let the dough come to room temperature and work it to make your
    pizza. We make our dough from bread flour and semolina with olive oil
    in it. It is a matter of taste.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  4. #4
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >I make my own pizza dough, but it never turns out like the local pizza
    > shop where I go. (Mineo's if you live in Pittsburgh Pa). I have tried
    > lots of different flours, all purpose, bread, and so forth. Is the
    > stretcheness of the dough related to the type of flour?


    Yes and the amount of "Kneeding"

    Read the following:

    http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-...tes-A-Day.aspx

    The think about where the pizzaria stores the dough - in a fridge - right?


  5. #5
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I make my own pizza dough, but it never turns out like the local pizza
    > shop where I go. (Mineo's if you live in Pittsburgh Pa). I have tried
    > lots of different flours, all purpose, bread, and so forth. Is the
    > stretcheness of the dough related to the type of flour? I enjoy my
    > toppings, but I still like the pizza shops dough better. My crust
    > tends to be crunchy, rather than solid.


    When I lived in Central Jersey, I used to just buy the dough at a local
    pizzaria. Can't you do that?


    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  6. #6
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question

    On Feb 12, 5:47*pm, "tomba...@city-net.com" <tomba...@city-net.com>
    wrote:
    > I make my own pizza dough, but it never turns out like the local pizza
    > shop where I go. (Mineo's if you live in Pittsburgh Pa). I have tried
    > lots of different flours, all purpose, bread, and so forth. Is the
    > stretcheness of the dough related to the type of flour? I enjoy my
    > toppings, but I still like the pizza shops dough better. My crust
    > tends to be crunchy, rather than solid.


    I don't get the difference between crunchy and solid. but, at any
    rate, I let my bread machine make the dough, I let it rest maybe 15
    minutes, then shape it on my peel.
    Be sure your oven is hot enough and a pizza stone is worth every cent.

  7. #7
    PeterL1 Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question

    Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote in news:4b75f909$0$7747
    $c3e8da3@news.a[email protected]:

    > [email protected] wrote:
    >> I make my own pizza dough, but it never turns out like the local pizza
    >> shop where I go. (Mineo's if you live in Pittsburgh Pa). I have tried
    >> lots of different flours, all purpose, bread, and so forth. Is the
    >> stretcheness of the dough related to the type of flour? I enjoy my
    >> toppings, but I still like the pizza shops dough better. My crust
    >> tends to be crunchy, rather than solid.

    >
    > When I lived in Central Jersey, I used to just buy the dough at a local
    > pizzaria. Can't you do that?
    >
    >



    My 10min pizza dough recipe comes out just like a 'normal' pizza base
    should.


    http://s199.photobucket.com/albums/a...7/Pizza%20and%
    20calzones/?action=view&current=15.jpg


    http://tinyurl.com/ks2zul




    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocrites.

    -- Albert Einstein --

  8. #8
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question


    "PeterL1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ...
    |
    | My 10min pizza dough recipe comes out just like a 'normal' pizza base
    | should.
    |
    Oohhhhhh, truly a Godlike performance. So Manly. So
    intellectually superb. So Italianate in its very aspects.

    pavane



  9. #9
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question


    "Ranée at Arabian Knits" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I make my own pizza dough, but it never turns out like the local pizza
    >> shop where I go. (Mineo's if you live in Pittsburgh Pa). I have tried
    >> lots of different flours, all purpose, bread, and so forth. Is the
    >> stretcheness of the dough related to the type of flour? I enjoy my
    >> toppings, but I still like the pizza shops dough better. My crust
    >> tends to be crunchy, rather than solid.

    >
    > The best results, IMO, come from an overnight rise in the fridge.
    > Then let the dough come to room temperature and work it to make your
    > pizza. We make our dough from bread flour and semolina with olive oil
    > in it. It is a matter of taste.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee @ Arabian Knits
    >
    >

    Right on! Make your dough the day before with a very small amount of yeast
    and rise overnight in the frig.




  10. #10
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question

    On Fri, 12 Feb 2010 20:46:33 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Ranée at Arabian Knits" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]..
    >> In article
    >> <[email protected]>,
    >> "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I make my own pizza dough, but it never turns out like the local pizza
    >>> shop where I go. (Mineo's if you live in Pittsburgh Pa). I have tried
    >>> lots of different flours, all purpose, bread, and so forth. Is the
    >>> stretcheness of the dough related to the type of flour? I enjoy my
    >>> toppings, but I still like the pizza shops dough better. My crust
    >>> tends to be crunchy, rather than solid.

    >>
    >> The best results, IMO, come from an overnight rise in the fridge.
    >> Then let the dough come to room temperature and work it to make your
    >> pizza. We make our dough from bread flour and semolina with olive oil
    >> in it. It is a matter of taste.
    >>
    >> Regards,
    >> Ranee @ Arabian Knits
    >>
    >>

    >Right on! Make your dough the day before with a very small amount of yeast
    >and rise overnight in the frig.


    Yes, a retarded rise, but do NOT permit it to come to room
    temperature, the dough needs to be stretched to shape cold (if you can
    roll your dough you did NOT make pizza dough) and placed into the oven
    while still cold or much of the oven spring potential will be lost
    (all toppings should be cold too). Anyone who has been to a pizzaria
    will note that the balls of dough are kept in a refrigerated cabinet
    until ordered, then working quickly is a must, as soon as topped it's
    placed into the oven immediately... unlike bread baking with pizza
    there is no dough proofing. Pizza stones do nothing, well they
    separate the pinheads from their dollars.


  11. #11
    piedmont Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question

    On 2/12/2010 7:28 PM, Dimitri wrote:
    >

    SNIP
    >
    > Read the following:
    >
    > http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-...tes-A-Day.aspx
    >snip


    Excellent! information, I will try this!

    mike
    --
    piedmont, The Practical BBQ'r

    http://sites.google.com/site/thepracticalbbqr/

    (mawil55)

  12. #12
    pltrgyst Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question

    On Sat, 13 Feb 2010 11:16:36 -0500, brooklyn1
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >... Pizza stones do nothing, well they
    >separate the pinheads from their dollars.


    Thanks for clearing that up. You against the world, eh?

    -- Larry

  13. #13
    pltrgyst Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question

    On Fri, 12 Feb 2010 16:28:01 -0800, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Read the following:
    >
    >http://www.motherearthnews.com/Real-...tes-A-Day.aspx


    Published and discussed at length in the New York Times, November 21,
    2007. We've kept this dough in the reefer routinely since then --
    works great!

    -- Larry


    NY Times, November 21, 2007
    Recipe: Simple Crusty Bread
    Adapted from “Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day,” by Jeff Hertzberg
    and Zoë François (Thomas Dunne Books, 2007)

    Time: About 45 minutes plus about 3 hours’ resting and rising

    1 1/2 tablespoons yeast

    1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt

    6 1/2 cups unbleached, all-purpose flour, more for dusting dough

    Cornmeal.

    1. In a large bowl or plastic container, mix yeast and salt into 3
    cups lukewarm water (about 100 degrees). Stir in flour, mixing until
    there are no dry patches. Dough will be quite loose. Cover, but not
    with an airtight lid. Let dough rise at room temperature 2 hours (or
    up to 5 hours).

    2. Bake at this point or refrigerate, covered, for as long as two
    weeks. When ready to bake, sprinkle a little flour on dough and cut
    off a grapefruit-size piece with serrated knife. Turn dough in hands
    to lightly stretch surface, creating a rounded top and a lumpy bottom.
    Put dough on pizza peel sprinkled with cornmeal; let rest 40 minutes.
    Repeat with remaining dough or refrigerate it.

    3. Place broiler pan on bottom of oven. Place baking stone on middle
    rack and turn oven to 450 degrees; heat stone at that temperature for
    20 minutes.

    4. Dust dough with flour, slash top with serrated or very sharp knife
    three times. Slide onto stone. Pour one cup hot water into broiler pan
    and shut oven quickly to trap steam. Bake until well browned, about 30
    minutes. Cool completely.

    Yield: 4 loaves.

    Variation: If not using stone, stretch rounded dough into oval and
    place in a greased, nonstick loaf pan. Let rest 40 minutes if fresh,
    an extra hour if refrigerated. Heat oven to 450 degrees for 5 minutes.
    Place pan on middle rack.

  14. #14
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question

    PeterL1 wrote:
    > Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote in news:4b75f909$0$7747
    > $[email protected]:
    >
    >> [email protected] wrote:
    >>> I make my own pizza dough, but it never turns out like the local pizza
    >>> shop where I go. (Mineo's if you live in Pittsburgh Pa). I have tried
    >>> lots of different flours, all purpose, bread, and so forth. Is the
    >>> stretcheness of the dough related to the type of flour? I enjoy my
    >>> toppings, but I still like the pizza shops dough better. My crust
    >>> tends to be crunchy, rather than solid.

    >> When I lived in Central Jersey, I used to just buy the dough at a local
    >> pizzaria. Can't you do that?
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > My 10min pizza dough recipe comes out just like a 'normal' pizza base
    > should.
    >
    >
    > http://s199.photobucket.com/albums/a...7/Pizza%20and%
    > 20calzones/?action=view&current=15.jpg
    >
    >
    > http://tinyurl.com/ks2zul



    Thanks, but what is "normal" in Australia, may not be what this Jersey
    Girl is looking for.


    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  15. #15
    PeterL1 Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question

    Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote in news:4b773389$0$10519
    $[email protected]:

    > PeterL1 wrote:
    >> Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote in news:4b75f909$0$7747
    >> $[email protected]:
    >>
    >>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>> I make my own pizza dough, but it never turns out like the local

    pizza
    >>>> shop where I go. (Mineo's if you live in Pittsburgh Pa). I have tried
    >>>> lots of different flours, all purpose, bread, and so forth. Is the
    >>>> stretcheness of the dough related to the type of flour? I enjoy my
    >>>> toppings, but I still like the pizza shops dough better. My crust
    >>>> tends to be crunchy, rather than solid.
    >>> When I lived in Central Jersey, I used to just buy the dough at a

    local
    >>> pizzaria. Can't you do that?
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >> My 10min pizza dough recipe comes out just like a 'normal' pizza base
    >> should.
    >>
    >>
    >> http://s199.photobucket.com/albums/a...7/Pizza%20and%
    >> 20calzones/?action=view&current=15.jpg
    >>
    >>
    >> http://tinyurl.com/ks2zul

    >
    >
    > Thanks, but what is "normal" in Australia, may not be what this Jersey
    > Girl is looking for.
    >
    >



    Normal as in pizza that I had throughout California, then.

    It's cooked through, with a slightly browned base, but is not *that*
    cooked, it's crunchy.

    How do you do yours?

    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocrites.

    -- Albert Einstein --

  16. #16
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question

    On Sat, 13 Feb 2010 17:19:41 -0600, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >PeterL1 wrote:


    >> My 10min pizza dough recipe comes out just like a 'normal' pizza base
    >> should.


    >Thanks, but what is "normal" in Australia, may not be what this Jersey
    >Girl is looking for.


    I have oft said here in rfc, that my favorite recipe is one from Peter
    Reinhardt, from his book American Pie. It is his Neopolitan style
    pizza dough. One of these days maybe I will get around to making some
    of the other doughs, but I love the pizzas these produce so much that
    I haven't branched out yet.

    For those of you that have The Bread Bakers Apprentice, he has a
    Neopolitan style dough there as well.

    These produce some of the best pizzeria style pizzas that I have ever
    had...

    A pizza I made last year, before it goes into the oven:
    http://i47.tinypic.com/2ppegb6.jpg

    The same pizza right out of the oven..
    http://i49.tinypic.com/15nkm1k.jpg


    Right now, I am kicking myself that I left my pizza stone back in NM.

    Christine

    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  17. #17
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question

    PeterL1 wrote:
    > Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote in news:4b773389$0$10519
    > $[email protected]:
    >
    >> PeterL1 wrote:
    >>> Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote in news:4b75f909$0$7747
    >>> $[email protected]:
    >>>
    >>>> [email protected] wrote:
    >>>>> I make my own pizza dough, but it never turns out like the local

    > pizza
    >>>>> shop where I go. (Mineo's if you live in Pittsburgh Pa). I have tried
    >>>>> lots of different flours, all purpose, bread, and so forth. Is the
    >>>>> stretcheness of the dough related to the type of flour? I enjoy my
    >>>>> toppings, but I still like the pizza shops dough better. My crust
    >>>>> tends to be crunchy, rather than solid.
    >>>> When I lived in Central Jersey, I used to just buy the dough at a

    > local
    >>>> pizzaria. Can't you do that?
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> My 10min pizza dough recipe comes out just like a 'normal' pizza base
    >>> should.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> http://s199.photobucket.com/albums/a...7/Pizza%20and%
    >>> 20calzones/?action=view&current=15.jpg
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> http://tinyurl.com/ks2zul

    >>
    >> Thanks, but what is "normal" in Australia, may not be what this Jersey
    >> Girl is looking for.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > Normal as in pizza that I had throughout California, then.
    >
    > It's cooked through, with a slightly browned base, but is not *that*
    > cooked, it's crunchy.
    >
    > How do you do yours?
    >

    Thin crust that is NOT crunchy. I have to be able to fold it in half.
    The Edge of the crust has to be crisp when bitten into, but airy inside.
    Most important of all, it must have "tooth" and must not be sweet. I
    want to chew the crust, not have it turn into mush in my mouth.

    I have been all over California and never found a crust that was
    perfect. The closest was a family-owned place in the San Diego area.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  18. #18
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question

    On Sat, 13 Feb 2010 16:48:09 -0500, pltrgyst wrote:

    > On Sat, 13 Feb 2010 11:16:36 -0500, brooklyn1
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>... Pizza stones do nothing, well they
    >>separate the pinheads from their dollars.

    >
    > Thanks for clearing that up. You against the world, eh?
    >
    > -- Larry


    thank god the world is winning.

    your pal,
    blake

  19. #19
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question


    "brooklyn1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 12 Feb 2010 20:46:33 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Ranée at Arabian Knits" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected]..
    >>> In article
    >>> <[email protected]>,
    >>> "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I make my own pizza dough, but it never turns out like the local pizza
    >>>> shop where I go. (Mineo's if you live in Pittsburgh Pa). I have tried
    >>>> lots of different flours, all purpose, bread, and so forth. Is the
    >>>> stretcheness of the dough related to the type of flour? I enjoy my
    >>>> toppings, but I still like the pizza shops dough better. My crust
    >>>> tends to be crunchy, rather than solid.
    >>>
    >>> The best results, IMO, come from an overnight rise in the fridge.
    >>> Then let the dough come to room temperature and work it to make your
    >>> pizza. We make our dough from bread flour and semolina with olive oil
    >>> in it. It is a matter of taste.
    >>>
    >>> Regards,
    >>> Ranee @ Arabian Knits
    >>>
    >>>

    >>Right on! Make your dough the day before with a very small amount of yeast
    >>and rise overnight in the frig.

    >
    > Yes, a retarded rise, but do NOT permit it to come to room
    > temperature, the dough needs to be stretched to shape cold (if you can
    > roll your dough you did NOT make pizza dough) and placed into the oven
    > while still cold or much of the oven spring potential will be lost
    > (all toppings should be cold too). Anyone who has been to a pizzaria
    > will note that the balls of dough are kept in a refrigerated cabinet
    > until ordered, then working quickly is a must, as soon as topped it's
    > placed into the oven immediately... unlike bread baking with pizza
    > there is no dough proofing. Pizza stones do nothing, well they
    > separate the pinheads from their dollars.
    >
    >

    If you don't use a pizza stone, whadya bake it on?




  20. #20
    Mort Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough Question

    Kent wrote:

    > "brooklyn1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    >>
    >>Yes, a retarded rise, but do NOT permit it to come to room
    >>temperature, the dough needs to be stretched to shape cold (if you can
    >>roll your dough you did NOT make pizza dough) and placed into the oven
    >>while still cold or much of the oven spring potential will be lost
    >>(all toppings should be cold too). Anyone who has been to a pizzaria
    >>will note that the balls of dough are kept in a refrigerated cabinet
    >>until ordered, then working quickly is a must, as soon as topped it's
    >>placed into the oven immediately... unlike bread baking with pizza
    >>there is no dough proofing. Pizza stones do nothing, well they
    >>separate the pinheads from their dollars.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > If you don't use a pizza stone, whadya bake it on?
    >
    >
    >


    Pizza pans work, the kind with the perforated bottoms, but
    they're still not as good as stones.

    --
    Mort

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