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Thread: Pizza Dough with Bread Machine

  1. #1
    Piedmont Guest

    Default Pizza Dough with Bread Machine

    Just started making pizza dough in my bread machine, works ok except the
    dough it not very pliable, what can i do to make it workable, easier to roll
    out, it's rubbery. looks good, just can't get it to roll out.
    Piedmont


  2. #2
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough with Bread Machine


    "Piedmont" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:%SZtl.106030$[email protected]..
    > Just started making pizza dough in my bread machine, works ok except the
    > dough it not very pliable, what can i do to make it workable, easier to
    > roll out, it's rubbery. looks good, just can't get it to roll out.
    > Piedmont


    I make pizza dough in the bread machine routinely. You have to make a fairly
    moist dough[1.25 cups water for 3 cups flour]. After the initial kneading,
    turn the machine off and rise the dough to twice normal. Do not over rise.
    Take the dough ball out, punch it down a bit on a floured kneading board,
    and let it sit until you want to make pizza.

    Ed




  3. #3
    Piedmont Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough with Bread Machine


    "Theron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:gpa481$p34$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Piedmont" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:%SZtl.106030$[email protected]..
    >> Just started making pizza dough in my bread machine, works ok except the
    >> dough it not very pliable, what can i do to make it workable, easier to
    >> roll out, it's rubbery. looks good, just can't get it to roll out.
    >> Piedmont

    >
    > I make pizza dough in the bread machine routinely. You have to make a
    > fairly moist dough[1.25 cups water for 3 cups flour]. After the initial
    > kneading, turn the machine off and rise the dough to twice normal. Do not
    > over rise. Take the dough ball out, punch it down a bit on a floured
    > kneading board, and let it sit until you want to make pizza.
    >
    > Ed
    >


    Ed,

    I was cutting back on the water because the dough was sooo sticky, I will
    add the water back in and oil my hands in order to roll/flatten it out. Here
    is the original dough recipe that came with the Breadman Bread Machine.

    water - 1 cup plus 2 Tbsp (I whittled it down to 1 cup minus 2 Tbsp)
    olive oil - 1-1/2 Tbsp
    salt - 1-1/2 tsp
    sugar - 1-1/2 tsp
    bread flour - 3 cups
    yeast 1-1/2 tsp

    Piedmont


  4. #4
    David Harmon Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough with Bread Machine

    On Thu, 12 Mar 2009 08:02:14 -0400 in rec.food.cooking, "Piedmont"
    <[email protected]> wrote,
    >
    >"Theron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:gpa481$p34$[email protected]..

    [...]
    >> over rise. Take the dough ball out, punch it down a bit on a floured
    >> kneading board, and let it sit until you want to make pizza.

    >
    >I was cutting back on the water because the dough was sooo sticky, I will
    >add the water back in and oil my hands in order to roll/flatten it out.


    I would not suggest oily hands. Instead do like Theron suggested,
    work it on a floured board so that the surface (only) of the dough ball
    incorporates extra flour and becomes non-sticky.

    Perhaps all-purpose flour instead of bread flour would be less rubbery.


  5. #5
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough with Bread Machine


    "David Harmon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Thu, 12 Mar 2009 08:02:14 -0400 in rec.food.cooking, "Piedmont"
    > <[email protected]> wrote,
    >>
    >>"Theron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:gpa481$p34$[email protected]..

    > [...]
    >>> over rise. Take the dough ball out, punch it down a bit on a floured
    >>> kneading board, and let it sit until you want to make pizza.

    >>
    >>I was cutting back on the water because the dough was sooo sticky, I will
    >>add the water back in and oil my hands in order to roll/flatten it out.

    >
    > I would not suggest oily hands. Instead do like Theron suggested,
    > work it on a floured board so that the surface (only) of the dough ball
    > incorporates extra flour and becomes non-sticky.
    >
    > Perhaps all-purpose flour instead of bread flour would be less rubbery.
    >


    All purpose flour is more appropriate than bread flower for pizza. In Italy
    they use
    double 00 flour for pizza, which is slightly lower in gluten than all
    purpose. You can mimic this
    somewhat by mixing 1/3 cake flour and 2/3 all purpose. I have stuck with all
    purpose. That's what
    my local pizza parlor does and that's essentially what I'm trying to mimic.
    I strongly agree to not use
    oily hands. Do it all with flour on the board. You don't, however, want to
    knead too much unleavened
    flour into the dough itself.

    Ed




  6. #6
    Piedmont Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough with Bread Machine


    "Theron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:gpbuer$387$[email protected]..
    >
    > "David Harmon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Thu, 12 Mar 2009 08:02:14 -0400 in rec.food.cooking, "Piedmont"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote,
    >>>
    >>>"Theron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:gpa481$p34$[email protected]..

    >> [...]
    >>>> over rise. Take the dough ball out, punch it down a bit on a floured
    >>>> kneading board, and let it sit until you want to make pizza.
    >>>
    >>>I was cutting back on the water because the dough was sooo sticky, I will
    >>>add the water back in and oil my hands in order to roll/flatten it out.

    >>
    >> I would not suggest oily hands. Instead do like Theron suggested,
    >> work it on a floured board so that the surface (only) of the dough ball
    >> incorporates extra flour and becomes non-sticky.
    >>
    >> Perhaps all-purpose flour instead of bread flour would be less rubbery.
    >>

    >
    > All purpose flour is more appropriate than bread flower for pizza. In
    > Italy they use
    > double 00 flour for pizza, which is slightly lower in gluten than all
    > purpose. You can mimic this
    > somewhat by mixing 1/3 cake flour and 2/3 all purpose. I have stuck with
    > all purpose. That's what
    > my local pizza parlor does and that's essentially what I'm trying to
    > mimic. I strongly agree to not use
    > oily hands. Do it all with flour on the board. You don't, however, want to
    > knead too much unleavened
    > flour into the dough itself.
    >
    > Ed
    >
    >
    >

    I have tried with all purpose 4 times and bread flour once, both the dough
    were extremely sticky unless cutting back on the water, globs onto any skin
    that touchs it. I did just as you said by working some flour into it after
    rising but it was soo sticky I ened up adding nearly 3/4 cup extra flour. Is
    there some way that you can describe the dough that you end up with. I mean,
    my dough is unbelievably sticky and onerous to lay out. I'd like to get it
    to the level of a pizza parlor when they toss it. I had a theory that I
    needed to let it rest and hour before using.


  7. #7
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: Pizza Dough with Bread Machine


    "Piedmont" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:OWhul.82493$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Theron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:gpbuer$387$[email protected]..
    >>
    >> "David Harmon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> On Thu, 12 Mar 2009 08:02:14 -0400 in rec.food.cooking, "Piedmont"
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote,
    >>>>
    >>>>"Theron" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>>news:gpa481$p34$[email protected]..
    >>> [...]
    >>>>> over rise. Take the dough ball out, punch it down a bit on a floured
    >>>>> kneading board, and let it sit until you want to make pizza.
    >>>>
    >>>>I was cutting back on the water because the dough was sooo sticky, I
    >>>>will
    >>>>add the water back in and oil my hands in order to roll/flatten it out.
    >>>
    >>> I would not suggest oily hands. Instead do like Theron suggested,
    >>> work it on a floured board so that the surface (only) of the dough ball
    >>> incorporates extra flour and becomes non-sticky.
    >>>
    >>> Perhaps all-purpose flour instead of bread flour would be less rubbery.
    >>>

    >>
    >> All purpose flour is more appropriate than bread flower for pizza. In
    >> Italy they use
    >> double 00 flour for pizza, which is slightly lower in gluten than all
    >> purpose. You can mimic this
    >> somewhat by mixing 1/3 cake flour and 2/3 all purpose. I have stuck with
    >> all purpose. That's what
    >> my local pizza parlor does and that's essentially what I'm trying to
    >> mimic. I strongly agree to not use
    >> oily hands. Do it all with flour on the board. You don't, however, want
    >> to knead too much unleavened
    >> flour into the dough itself.
    >>
    >> Ed
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > I have tried with all purpose 4 times and bread flour once, both the dough
    > were extremely sticky unless cutting back on the water, globs onto any
    > skin that touchs it. I did just as you said by working some flour into it
    > after rising but it was soo sticky I ened up adding nearly 3/4 cup extra
    > flour. Is there some way that you can describe the dough that you end up
    > with. I mean, my dough is unbelievably sticky and onerous to lay out. I'd
    > like to get it to the level of a pizza parlor when they toss it. I had a
    > theory that I needed to let it rest and hour before using.


    Following is close to what I do.I use a biga or sponge, frequently, though
    you don't have to. I use 1TB olive oil for 3 cups flour and 1.75 tsp Kosher
    salt. The recipe below is even stickier than my 3 cups flour to1.25cups
    water. It does that you must be gentle to get it on the pizza stone. I
    always, after the first rise, divide the ball into two and punch the balls
    slightly to flatten a bit on a floured wooden bread board[2 feet by 3 feet
    of 1/2 inch plywood from your local lumbar yard]. When you're going to make
    your pizza, very gently stretch the dough out to about 12 inches, and then
    grasping the edge around slowly nurse the outer edges to give you a pizza
    round of 14-16 inches, depending on to the degree of thinness you want it.
    Do this on a floured pizza paddle[from your local restaurant supply store,
    much cheaper, and much better than William Sonoma]. Then top with whatever
    you want. For the first several pizzas top gingerly until you are
    comfortable getting the pizza from your paddle to the heated pizza stone.
    Make a simple pizza margharita.
    http://splendidtable.publicradio.org...ead_pizza.html This dough is
    more moist than mine.
    ALWAYS, heat your pizza stone to 500+F for at least 45 minutes before you
    proceed. After the pizza is on the stone, spray water gently to the top half
    of your oven. This crisps the edges. Your pizza should bake in 6-8 minutes.
    I usually am not able to throw my pizza round as they do in pizza parlors,
    thought now and then I do. Do not overknead your dough! Pizza should have a
    crisp airy crust, and should be nice and stiff under the topping. Don't buy
    your first stone at Macy's. As a trial Walmart, ours at least, had a thin
    pizza stone. It works on my grill for outdoor pizza, though that's a whole
    new effort. Get a hefty stone, over 1/2 inches when you get into this.

    The best of luck to you. :If you tried four times you'll make it fine.

    Ed






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