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Thread: pizza baking strategy

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default pizza baking strategy

    I normally make a 12 inch round pie and bake it on my round stone.
    I'd like to make a large pizza for company and thought I might use a
    13 inch pan and make an oblong pie. Since the dough won't be going
    directly onto that stone, what adjustments should I make in time and
    temperature? Any other suggestions for avoiding a soggy bottom?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: pizza baking strategy

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > I normally make a 12 inch round pie and bake it on my round stone.
    > I'd like to make a large pizza for company and thought I might use a
    > 13 inch pan and make an oblong pie. Since the dough won't be going
    > directly onto that stone, what adjustments should I make in time and
    > temperature? Any other suggestions for avoiding a soggy bottom?
    >
    > Thanks.


    This isn't what you want to hear and it doesn't answer your t&t
    question, but I'd bake two smaller pizzas rather than one big one. You
    can make a couple different kinds and be eating one while the other
    bakes. Cut smaller pieces if you have to in order to make a piece
    available to everyone on the first pass. JMO.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    "What you say about someone else says more
    about you than it does about the other person."

  3. #3
    ..PL.. Guest

    Default Re: pizza baking strategy

    [email protected] wrote in news:9b36f6d2-9f3b-42e4-86ad-69a3455c4a52@
    41g2000yqf.googlegroups.com:

    > I normally make a 12 inch round pie and bake it on my round stone.
    > I'd like to make a large pizza for company and thought I might use a
    > 13 inch pan and make an oblong pie. Since the dough won't be going
    > directly onto that stone, what adjustments should I make in time and
    > temperature? Any other suggestions for avoiding a soggy bottom?
    >
    > Thanks.
    >



    Drill holes in the pan.

    I have two pizza trays. One 'normal' one with holes. I have to take the pizza
    off the 'normal' one to finish cooking the bottom, the one with holes does it
    in one shot.



    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia

    Killfile all Google Groups posters.........

    http://improve-usenet.org/

    http://improve-usenet.org/filters_bg.html

  4. #4
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: pizza baking strategy


    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >> I normally make a 12 inch round pie and bake it on my round stone.
    >> I'd like to make a large pizza for company and thought I might use a
    >> 13 inch pan and make an oblong pie. Since the dough won't be going
    >> directly onto that stone, what adjustments should I make in time and
    >> temperature? Any other suggestions for avoiding a soggy bottom?
    >>
    >> Thanks.

    >
    > This isn't what you want to hear and it doesn't answer your t&t
    > question, but I'd bake two smaller pizzas rather than one big one. You
    > can make a couple different kinds and be eating one while the other
    > bakes. Cut smaller pieces if you have to in order to make a piece
    > available to everyone on the first pass. JMO.
    > --
    > -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    > http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    > "What you say about someone else says more
    > about you than it does about the other person."


    I agree. If you're used to a stone, a pan will change everything. As Barb
    says, make two.

    Ed.



  5. #5
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: pizza baking strategy

    On Mar 13, 9:52*pm, "Theron" <oa...@rocketmail.com> wrote:
    > "Melba's Jammin'" <barbschal...@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    >
    >
    > > In article
    > > <9b36f6d2-9f3b-42e4-86ad-69a3455c4...@41g2000yqf.googlegroups.com>,
    > > tweeny90...@mypacks.net wrote:

    >
    > >> I normally make a 12 inch round pie and bake it on my round stone.
    > >> I'd like to make a large pizza for company and thought I might use a
    > >> 13 inch pan and make an oblong pie. *Since the dough won't be going
    > >> directly onto that stone, what adjustments should I make in time and
    > >> temperature? *Any other suggestions for avoiding *a soggy bottom?

    >
    > >> Thanks.

    >
    > > This isn't what you want to hear and it doesn't answer your t&t
    > > question, but I'd bake two smaller pizzas rather than one big one. *You
    > > can make a couple different kinds and be eating one while the other
    > > bakes. *Cut smaller pieces if you have to in order to make a piece
    > > available to everyone on the first pass. *JMO.
    > > --
    > > -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    > >http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    > > "What you say about someone else says more
    > > about you than it does about the other person."

    >
    > I agree. If you're used to a stone, a pan will change everything. As Barb
    > says, make two.
    >
    > Ed.


    Yeah - I've tried to think it thru. I can see myself having to jump
    up and down to eat, get that other pie in the oven (and I use a two
    stage baking method too.)

    I guess it can't be helped. I COULD load on so much in the way of
    toppings that no one would want more than a slice or two. I could
    always slice it into ten rather than eight. I could load 'em up on
    salad and some minestrone beforehand.

    Thanks for the thoughts. I KNOW in my heart that going from stone
    baked to pan would---well-- NOT be good.

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: pizza baking strategy

    On Sat, 14 Mar 2009 07:00:08 -0700 (PDT), [email protected]
    wrote:
    >
    >Yeah - I've tried to think it thru. I can see myself having to jump
    >up and down to eat, get that other pie in the oven (and I use a two
    >stage baking method too.)
    >
    >I guess it can't be helped. I COULD load on so much in the way of
    >toppings that no one would want more than a slice or two. I could
    >always slice it into ten rather than eight. I could load 'em up on
    >salad and some minestrone beforehand.
    >
    >Thanks for the thoughts. I KNOW in my heart that going from stone
    >baked to pan would---well-- NOT be good.


    Why don't you get a larger "stone" or line your oven shelf with
    unglazed quarry tiles? I prefer tiles myself. They even take on a
    glossy black "nonstick" quality after enough uses, provided you don't
    break them first.


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
    interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  7. #7
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: pizza baking strategy

    On Mar 14, 11:39*am, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Sat, 14 Mar 2009 07:00:08 -0700 (PDT), tweeny90...@mypacks.net
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > >Yeah - I've tried to think it thru. *I can see myself having to jump
    > >up and down to eat, get that other pie in the oven (and I use a two
    > >stage baking method too.)

    >
    > >I guess it can't be helped. *I COULD load on so much in the way of
    > >toppings that no one would want more than a slice or two. *I could
    > >always slice it into ten rather than eight. *I could load 'em up on
    > >salad and some minestrone beforehand.

    >
    > >Thanks for the thoughts. I KNOW in my heart that going from stone
    > >baked to pan would---well-- NOT be good.

    >
    > Why don't you get a larger "stone" or line your oven shelf with
    > unglazed quarry tiles? *I prefer tiles myself. *They even take on a
    > glossy black "nonstick" quality after enough uses, provided you don't
    > break them first.



    Thanks, but not worth the trouble for the few times I'm inclined to
    throw pizza parties.

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