Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: pink salmon report

  1. #1
    tert in seattle Guest

    Default pink salmon report

    This is an interesting fish. It gets panned a lot but I doubt many
    people with a negative opinion have tried the good stuff. Which means,
    pink salmon that didn't sit around and wait to be frozen while the
    more desirable species in the catch were frozen right away.

    I'm assuming pink salmon was always considered less desirable because
    the color of the flesh just doesn't look all that appetizing esp when
    compared to other species, and of course it has less flavor, less "umami"
    I guess is the technical term. So it starts off at a disadvantage and
    then gets worse because of the second-class citizen treatment, ultimately
    ending up in a can and eaten only by poor people and cats.

    HOWEVER ... if you have a source for pink salmon that was handled
    properly then you can not only enjoy some decent fish but also since
    the pinks are caught after two years they have less contamination, and
    they are not overfished so they make a good sustainable choice.

    I got a cleaned pink salmon from Ballard Farmers Market in Seattle and,
    being a one-knife cook, cut it up into steaks and poached them. I was
    unimpressed but they were okay. I got another one and finally succumbed
    to the reality of the situation and bought a boning knife which isn't
    correct of course but the place I went to didn't have fillet knives and
    I don't really know how to use one anyway. Besides the fish is cheap
    enough that I can waste a little flesh and not give a ****. So I did
    my own butchery attempt at filleting the thing, poached it with celery,
    carrot, and garlic, and you know, it's pretty darned good stuff! I
    also made some salmon salad with it and there's some left that I'll
    turn into a few salmon burgers.

    One thing I will note is the flesh is indeed very pale pink -- you don't
    really appreciate how little visual appeal it has until you see it for
    yourself.

    Also keep in mind that it doesn't keep well at all and should spend
    as little time thawed as possible before cooking.


  2. #2
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: pink salmon report

    On 1/24/2012 11:42 AM, tert in seattle wrote:
    > This is an interesting fish. It gets panned a lot but I doubt many
    > people with a negative opinion have tried the good stuff. Which means,
    > pink salmon that didn't sit around and wait to be frozen while the
    > more desirable species in the catch were frozen right away.
    >
    > I'm assuming pink salmon was always considered less desirable because
    > the color of the flesh just doesn't look all that appetizing esp when
    > compared to other species, and of course it has less flavor, less "umami"
    > I guess is the technical term. So it starts off at a disadvantage and
    > then gets worse because of the second-class citizen treatment, ultimately
    > ending up in a can and eaten only by poor people and cats.
    >
    > HOWEVER ... if you have a source for pink salmon that was handled
    > properly then you can not only enjoy some decent fish but also since
    > the pinks are caught after two years they have less contamination, and
    > they are not overfished so they make a good sustainable choice.
    >
    > I got a cleaned pink salmon from Ballard Farmers Market in Seattle and,
    > being a one-knife cook, cut it up into steaks and poached them. I was
    > unimpressed but they were okay. I got another one and finally succumbed
    > to the reality of the situation and bought a boning knife which isn't
    > correct of course but the place I went to didn't have fillet knives and
    > I don't really know how to use one anyway. Besides the fish is cheap
    > enough that I can waste a little flesh and not give a ****. So I did
    > my own butchery attempt at filleting the thing, poached it with celery,
    > carrot, and garlic, and you know, it's pretty darned good stuff! I
    > also made some salmon salad with it and there's some left that I'll
    > turn into a few salmon burgers.
    >
    > One thing I will note is the flesh is indeed very pale pink -- you don't
    > really appreciate how little visual appeal it has until you see it for
    > yourself.
    >
    > Also keep in mind that it doesn't keep well at all and should spend
    > as little time thawed as possible before cooking.
    >


    My late brother-in-law who lived in Gold Bar WA would say that buying
    salmon in a store was for suckers but he never caught one, cleaned,
    fileted, and wrapped up a salmon for me. Not even one time. :-)

  3. #3
    tert in seattle Guest

    Default Re: pink salmon report

    dsi1 wrote:
    > On 1/24/2012 11:42 AM, tert in seattle wrote:
    >> This is an interesting fish. It gets panned a lot but I doubt many
    >> people with a negative opinion have tried the good stuff. Which means,
    >> pink salmon that didn't sit around and wait to be frozen while the
    >> more desirable species in the catch were frozen right away.
    >>
    >> I'm assuming pink salmon was always considered less desirable because
    >> the color of the flesh just doesn't look all that appetizing esp when
    >> compared to other species, and of course it has less flavor, less "umami"
    >> I guess is the technical term. So it starts off at a disadvantage and
    >> then gets worse because of the second-class citizen treatment, ultimately
    >> ending up in a can and eaten only by poor people and cats.
    >>
    >> HOWEVER ... if you have a source for pink salmon that was handled
    >> properly then you can not only enjoy some decent fish but also since
    >> the pinks are caught after two years they have less contamination, and
    >> they are not overfished so they make a good sustainable choice.
    >>
    >> I got a cleaned pink salmon from Ballard Farmers Market in Seattle and,
    >> being a one-knife cook, cut it up into steaks and poached them. I was
    >> unimpressed but they were okay. I got another one and finally succumbed
    >> to the reality of the situation and bought a boning knife which isn't
    >> correct of course but the place I went to didn't have fillet knives and
    >> I don't really know how to use one anyway. Besides the fish is cheap
    >> enough that I can waste a little flesh and not give a ****. So I did
    >> my own butchery attempt at filleting the thing, poached it with celery,
    >> carrot, and garlic, and you know, it's pretty darned good stuff! I
    >> also made some salmon salad with it and there's some left that I'll
    >> turn into a few salmon burgers.
    >>
    >> One thing I will note is the flesh is indeed very pale pink -- you don't
    >> really appreciate how little visual appeal it has until you see it for
    >> yourself.
    >>
    >> Also keep in mind that it doesn't keep well at all and should spend
    >> as little time thawed as possible before cooking.
    >>

    >
    > My late brother-in-law who lived in Gold Bar WA would say that buying
    > salmon in a store was for suckers but he never caught one, cleaned,
    > fileted, and wrapped up a salmon for me. Not even one time. :-)


    I've driven past Gold Bar. It's out there somewhere between po and dunk.


  4. #4
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Re: pink salmon report


    Tert, I'm not exactly sure what you mean by "pink salmon"? By your
    description I'm wondering if it isn't a Humpy (spelling?) as that's a
    more pink color compared to other salmons. We live in Alaska and my dad
    was a commercial fisherman as I was growing up, he always caught a lot
    of Humpies when he was fishing, but would toss them, although I have
    heard of people eating them, and also canning them, but I can't recall
    ever eating any.

    Other salmon that we get here, which is very good are Sockeye and Coho,
    but they are a brighter pink, and the best salmon at all, the King
    Salmon, either white or red, which is what hubby and I prefer. I refuse
    to it unless it's real fresh, but I realize I'm probably spoiled because
    of growing up as a fisherman's daughter.

    Judy


  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: pink salmon report

    On Tue, 24 Jan 2012 21:42:41 +0000 (UTC), tert in seattle
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > This is an interesting fish. It gets panned a lot but I doubt many
    > people with a negative opinion have tried the good stuff. Which means,
    > pink salmon that didn't sit around and wait to be frozen while the
    > more desirable species in the catch were frozen right away.
    >
    > I'm assuming pink salmon was always considered less desirable because
    > the color of the flesh just doesn't look all that appetizing esp when
    > compared to other species, and of course it has less flavor, less "umami"
    > I guess is the technical term.


    That's my main problem with it, it's just not as tasty as the redder
    salmon.

    --

    Tell congress not to censor the web. Add your voice here.
    https://www.google.com/landing/takeaction/

  6. #6
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: pink salmon report

    On 1/24/2012 12:24 PM, tert in seattle wrote:
    > dsi1 wrote:
    >> On 1/24/2012 11:42 AM, tert in seattle wrote:
    >>> This is an interesting fish. It gets panned a lot but I doubt many
    >>> people with a negative opinion have tried the good stuff. Which means,
    >>> pink salmon that didn't sit around and wait to be frozen while the
    >>> more desirable species in the catch were frozen right away.
    >>>
    >>> I'm assuming pink salmon was always considered less desirable because
    >>> the color of the flesh just doesn't look all that appetizing esp when
    >>> compared to other species, and of course it has less flavor, less "umami"
    >>> I guess is the technical term. So it starts off at a disadvantage and
    >>> then gets worse because of the second-class citizen treatment, ultimately
    >>> ending up in a can and eaten only by poor people and cats.
    >>>
    >>> HOWEVER ... if you have a source for pink salmon that was handled
    >>> properly then you can not only enjoy some decent fish but also since
    >>> the pinks are caught after two years they have less contamination, and
    >>> they are not overfished so they make a good sustainable choice.
    >>>
    >>> I got a cleaned pink salmon from Ballard Farmers Market in Seattle and,
    >>> being a one-knife cook, cut it up into steaks and poached them. I was
    >>> unimpressed but they were okay. I got another one and finally succumbed
    >>> to the reality of the situation and bought a boning knife which isn't
    >>> correct of course but the place I went to didn't have fillet knives and
    >>> I don't really know how to use one anyway. Besides the fish is cheap
    >>> enough that I can waste a little flesh and not give a ****. So I did
    >>> my own butchery attempt at filleting the thing, poached it with celery,
    >>> carrot, and garlic, and you know, it's pretty darned good stuff! I
    >>> also made some salmon salad with it and there's some left that I'll
    >>> turn into a few salmon burgers.
    >>>
    >>> One thing I will note is the flesh is indeed very pale pink -- you don't
    >>> really appreciate how little visual appeal it has until you see it for
    >>> yourself.
    >>>
    >>> Also keep in mind that it doesn't keep well at all and should spend
    >>> as little time thawed as possible before cooking.
    >>>

    >>
    >> My late brother-in-law who lived in Gold Bar WA would say that buying
    >> salmon in a store was for suckers but he never caught one, cleaned,
    >> fileted, and wrapped up a salmon for me. Not even one time. :-)

    >
    > I've driven past Gold Bar. It's out there somewhere between po and dunk.
    >


    My guess is that Gold Bar might be the most driven past town on the
    mainland. They're mostly famous for their speed traps. One thing about
    speed traps is that they haven't found a way to make those cheaper in
    China or outsource it to India. :-)

  7. #7
    tert in seattle Guest

    Default Re: pink salmon report

    Judy Haffner wrote:
    >
    > Tert, I'm not exactly sure what you mean by "pink salmon"? By your
    > description I'm wondering if it isn't a Humpy (spelling?) as that's a
    > more pink color compared to other salmons. We live in Alaska and my dad
    > was a commercial fisherman as I was growing up, he always caught a lot
    > of Humpies when he was fishing, but would toss them, although I have
    > heard of people eating them, and also canning them, but I can't recall
    > ever eating any.
    >
    > Other salmon that we get here, which is very good are Sockeye and Coho,
    > but they are a brighter pink, and the best salmon at all, the King
    > Salmon, either white or red, which is what hubby and I prefer. I refuse
    > to it unless it's real fresh, but I realize I'm probably spoiled because
    > of growing up as a fisherman's daughter.
    >
    > Judy


    yep it's also known as humpback salmon

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink_salmon

    I didn't know there were two types of King. I love all salmon and
    being from the midwest it's great just being able to find the store
    bought (or farmer's market bought) stuff that's frozen on the boat.


  8. #8
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Re: pink salmon report


    Tert wrote:

    >yep it's also known as humpback salmon


    >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink_salmon


    Yes, that is the "formal" name of them then, but around here, we just
    call them Humpies. I think our one son has fixed them, and said they
    were good, so if I think of it, I will try and remember to ask him how
    he does prepare them.

    >I didn't know there were two types of
    > King. I love all salmon and being from
    > the midwest it's great just being able to
    > find the store bought (or farmer's market
    > bought) stuff that's frozen on the boat.


    I suppose it wouldn't be that easy to come by salmon there, that hasn't
    been frozen. We had salmon often when I was growing up at home, and when
    mom put it in the pan to cook, it would practically still be wiggling,
    it was so fresh, so as I said, I'm probably just spoiled?! To me, it
    tastes dry if it has previously been quick frozen at sea.

    Yes, the Wild Alaskan King Salmon can be bright pink, or white. Some
    prefer the pink, probably because of the color, but the flavor of the
    white is every bit as delicious, and is a little oily, which my hubby
    likes.

    Judy


  9. #9
    tert in seattle Guest

    Default Re: pink salmon report

    Judy Haffner wrote:
    >
    > Tert wrote:
    >
    >>yep it's also known as humpback salmon

    >
    >>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink_salmon

    >
    > Yes, that is the "formal" name of them then, but around here, we just
    > call them Humpies. I think our one son has fixed them, and said they
    > were good, so if I think of it, I will try and remember to ask him how
    > he does prepare them.
    >
    >>I didn't know there were two types of
    >> King. I love all salmon and being from
    >> the midwest it's great just being able to
    >> find the store bought (or farmer's market
    >> bought) stuff that's frozen on the boat.

    >
    > I suppose it wouldn't be that easy to come by salmon there, that hasn't
    > been frozen. We had salmon often when I was growing up at home, and when
    > mom put it in the pan to cook, it would practically still be wiggling,
    > it was so fresh, so as I said, I'm probably just spoiled?! To me, it
    > tastes dry if it has previously been quick frozen at sea.
    >
    > Yes, the Wild Alaskan King Salmon can be bright pink, or white. Some
    > prefer the pink, probably because of the color, but the flavor of the
    > white is every bit as delicious, and is a little oily, which my hubby
    > likes.
    >
    > Judy


    thanks Judy, I'd like to know how your son perpares pink salmon

    how did your mom typically cook salmon when you were growing up?


  10. #10
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Re: pink salmon report


    Tert wrote:

    >how did your mom typically cook salmon
    > when you were growing up?


    Most often she would cut it into steaks and pan fry in a little oil just
    till it was done, maybe 8 minutes per side at a medium heat. If it's
    overcooked, it really is not as tasty. She also often would bake a chunk
    and in the cavity, she would layer sliced onions and chopped celery and
    different seasons. Sometimes she'd lay bacon strips over the top (the
    skin would still be one) and then she'd made a creamed egg-lemon sauce
    to serve on it..yummy! Also she would boil it, and also some potatoes to
    mash up and make patties with it. She'd make salmon chowder, salmon
    loaves and canned quite a bit of it too.

    My favorite meal as a kid was fresh pan-fried salmon with boiled new
    potatoes and creamed peas from my grandma's garden! )

    Judy


  11. #11
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Re: pink salmon report


    tert wrote:

    >I'd like to know how your son perpares
    > pink salmon


    Okay, son just showed up here. He filets the Humpy and bakes it (in
    foil-lined pan) without covering till almost done (?) He says it doesn't
    take long. While it's in the oven, he heats up the grill and finishes it
    on the grill, putting some butter and dill weed, salt and pepper on it
    and right when it's done, sprinkle it with some lemon juice. He says it
    is really good that way.

    When he fixes it, it's fresh, and caught out in front of his cabin. It's
    firm then, but he says once it's been frozen and thawed out, it's soft.

    Judy


  12. #12
    tert in seattle Guest

    Default Re: pink salmon report

    Judy Haffner wrote:
    >
    > tert wrote:
    >
    >>I'd like to know how your son perpares
    >> pink salmon

    >
    > Okay, son just showed up here. He filets the Humpy and bakes it (in
    > foil-lined pan) without covering till almost done (?) He says it doesn't
    > take long. While it's in the oven, he heats up the grill and finishes it
    > on the grill, putting some butter and dill weed, salt and pepper on it
    > and right when it's done, sprinkle it with some lemon juice. He says it
    > is really good that way.
    >
    > When he fixes it, it's fresh, and caught out in front of his cabin. It's
    > firm then, but he says once it's been frozen and thawed out, it's soft.
    >
    > Judy



    Thanks for this and your other post ... grilling is probably my favorite
    way to eat salmon ... you're right, you are spoiled! On the other hand,
    your days are pretty short now.


  13. #13
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: pink salmon report

    tert in seattle wrote:
    >
    > This is an interesting fish. It gets panned a lot but I doubt many
    > people with a negative opinion have tried the good stuff. Which means,
    > pink salmon that didn't sit around and wait to be frozen while the
    > more desirable species in the catch were frozen right away.


    Being a different and less desired species would explain why the canned
    version costs so much less. To me by the time it's canned there's not
    that much difference any more. At least the difference between "fresh
    any species salmon" and "canned same species salmon" is larger than the
    differences among any fresh species.

    > I was unimpressed but they were okay.


    This is my wife's attitude towards Atlantic salmon. When we lived in
    PNW I don't think she ever purchased any pink salmon fresh. She grew up
    there so she did all of the seafood shopping while we were there.

    My attitude is biased by the fact that I grew up in the east but far
    enough from the ocean that the fresh fish we got were fresh water
    species. To me the difference between canned and fresh salmon is so
    large that I like the fresh stuff irrespective of species. Yes I can
    tell the difference among the species but I don't care to anywhere near
    the point she does.

  14. #14
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Re: pink salmon report


    tert wrote:

    >Thanks for this and your other post ...

    ? grilling is probably my favorite way to
    > eat salmon ... you're right, you are
    > spoiled! On the other hand, your days
    > are pretty short now.


    No problem, am glad to be of some help.

    You're right, when it comes to fish, I will admit I have very spoiled.
    However, I have eaten halibut, that previously has been frozen. If it's
    prepared right, it will still be moist and tasty, but for some reason,
    salmon just loses some of it's flavor and texture in the freezing
    process, IMO.

    We are gradually starting to gain some daylight, but it's still fairly
    dark out until about 7:30 in the morning, and by 3:30 we're having to
    turn the car lights on, and more light in the house. Before long though,
    we will hardly have any darkness. Starting in June, we can still make
    out objects at midnight looking out the window and by 3:am the sun is
    coming back up. That's why they call it the "land of the midnight sun"
    here.

    Judy


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32