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Thread: PING: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...

  1. #1
    Pete C. Guest

    Default PING: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...


    I need to find a recipe for a thick cherry jelly/jam/glaze that can be
    applied ~3/8" thick on top of a cheesecake and solidify to provide a
    chocolate enrobable surface, i.e. the topping needs to survive the brief
    heat of enrobing without melting. A spreadable version would be best to
    allow it to be applied to an unmolded cheesecake. It could potentially
    be poured onto a cooled cheesecake before removal from the springform
    pan, however it would need to set pretty quickly so the springform pan
    could be removed and used on the next batch. Due to the need for the
    long cool down cycle of the cheesecake production will already be
    somewhat slow, fortunately we will be doing this in 4" springform pans,
    so that should reduce the required cool down time vs. the typical 9"
    pans. We plan to try making some prototypes this Saturday BTW.

    Thanks,

    Pete C.

  2. #2
    Jason Tinling Guest

    Default Re: PING: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...

    On Jan 27, 9:44*am, "Pete C." <aux3.DO...@snet.net> wrote:
    > I need to find a recipe for a thick cherry jelly/jam/glaze that can be
    > applied ~3/8" thick on top of a cheesecake and solidify to provide a
    > chocolate enrobable surface, i.e. the topping needs to survive the brief
    > heat of enrobing without melting. A spreadable version would be best to
    > allow it to be applied to an unmolded cheesecake. It could potentially
    > be poured onto a cooled cheesecake before removal from the springform
    > pan, however it would need to set pretty quickly so the springform pan
    > could be removed and used on the next batch. Due to the need for the
    > long cool down cycle of the cheesecake production will already be
    > somewhat slow, fortunately we will be doing this in 4" springform pans,
    > so that should reduce the required cool down time vs. the typical 9"
    > pans. We plan to try making some prototypes this Saturday BTW.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > * * * * Pete C.


    Pete,

    A trick that works for the missus and I when doing jelly filling for
    cakes is to take your preferred jelly/jam (about 12oz) and heat it in
    the microwave, then mix in a packet of sugar free Jello of the same
    flavor. Set time is not lightning fast, but fairly quick, and can be
    recovered to spreadability with another application of heat. Enrobing
    temperatures shouldn't be sufficiently high to really loosen it up, I
    don't think.

    Jason

  3. #3
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: PING: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...

    In article <4d41afb3$0$16691$[email protected] .com>,
    "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I need to find a recipe for a thick cherry jelly/jam/glaze that can be
    > applied ~3/8" thick on top of a cheesecake and solidify to provide a
    > chocolate enrobable surface, i.e. the topping needs to survive the brief
    > heat of enrobing without melting. A spreadable version would be best to
    > allow it to be applied to an unmolded cheesecake. It could potentially
    > be poured onto a cooled cheesecake before removal from the springform
    > pan, however it would need to set pretty quickly so the springform pan
    > could be removed and used on the next batch. Due to the need for the
    > long cool down cycle of the cheesecake production will already be
    > somewhat slow, fortunately we will be doing this in 4" springform pans,
    > so that should reduce the required cool down time vs. the typical 9"
    > pans. We plan to try making some prototypes this Saturday BTW.
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Pete C.


    Pete, I haven't a clue. I'm very sorry. What kind of enrobing are you
    doing? What if you just spread jam generously on top and started with
    that? Jelly will only lead to misery, I fear: It should be stiff to
    start with and if you were to melt it down and then pour it, you're left
    with the problem of hot or warm jelly and then you're going to involve
    chocolate on top of it. I don't see a happy ending there.

    Sorry to be of no help for you. :-(

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    Pepparkakor particulars posted 11-29-2010;
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller

  4. #4
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: PING: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...


    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    > In article <4d41afb3$0$16691$[email protected] .com>,
    > "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I need to find a recipe for a thick cherry jelly/jam/glaze that can be
    > > applied ~3/8" thick on top of a cheesecake and solidify to provide a
    > > chocolate enrobable surface, i.e. the topping needs to survive the brief
    > > heat of enrobing without melting. A spreadable version would be best to
    > > allow it to be applied to an unmolded cheesecake. It could potentially
    > > be poured onto a cooled cheesecake before removal from the springform
    > > pan, however it would need to set pretty quickly so the springform pan
    > > could be removed and used on the next batch. Due to the need for the
    > > long cool down cycle of the cheesecake production will already be
    > > somewhat slow, fortunately we will be doing this in 4" springform pans,
    > > so that should reduce the required cool down time vs. the typical 9"
    > > pans. We plan to try making some prototypes this Saturday BTW.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Pete C.

    >
    > Pete, I haven't a clue. I'm very sorry. What kind of enrobing are you
    > doing? What if you just spread jam generously on top and started with
    > that? Jelly will only lead to misery, I fear: It should be stiff to
    > start with and if you were to melt it down and then pour it, you're left
    > with the problem of hot or warm jelly and then you're going to involve
    > chocolate on top of it. I don't see a happy ending there.
    >
    > Sorry to be of no help for you. :-(


    Are you familiar with the jelly filled chocolates as in the typical
    sampler, valentine's heart boxes, etc? That is essentially what I'm
    looking for.

    As for the jelly, it could be poured into the springform pans on top of
    the cooled cheesecake, as long as it will harden sufficiently when it
    has cooled (15 min in fridge?) so that the springform pan can be removed
    leaving the molded jelly layer on top of the cheesecake.

    For the enrobing I'm expecting the refrigerated (or even frozen) jelly
    topped cheesecake to be placed on a wire rack and have dark chocolate
    poured over it to enrobe it, then the chocolate will harden after which
    it will be decorated. If they can chocolate coat a Klondike ice cream
    bar, I expect I should be able to coat a jelly topped cheesecake.

    The end result should be a chocolate shell with a cherry jelly layer
    over a creamy cheesecake layer for something reminiscent of a chocolate
    covered cherry. The level and smooth top surface will allow for
    decoration, and these are actually heart shaped 4" springform pans.

  5. #5
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: PING: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...

    On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 17:28:37 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <4d41afb3$0$16691$[email protected] .com>,
    > "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I need to find a recipe for a thick cherry jelly/jam/glaze that can be
    >> applied ~3/8" thick on top of a cheesecake and solidify to provide a
    >> chocolate enrobable surface, i.e. the topping needs to survive the brief
    >> heat of enrobing without melting. A spreadable version would be best to
    >> allow it to be applied to an unmolded cheesecake. It could potentially
    >> be poured onto a cooled cheesecake before removal from the springform
    >> pan, however it would need to set pretty quickly so the springform pan
    >> could be removed and used on the next batch. Due to the need for the
    >> long cool down cycle of the cheesecake production will already be
    >> somewhat slow, fortunately we will be doing this in 4" springform pans,
    >> so that should reduce the required cool down time vs. the typical 9"
    >> pans. We plan to try making some prototypes this Saturday BTW.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Pete C.

    >
    >Pete, I haven't a clue. I'm very sorry. What kind of enrobing are you
    >doing? What if you just spread jam generously on top and started with
    >that? Jelly will only lead to misery, I fear: It should be stiff to
    >start with and if you were to melt it down and then pour it, you're left
    >with the problem of hot or warm jelly and then you're going to involve
    >chocolate on top of it. I don't see a happy ending there.
    >
    >Sorry to be of no help for you. :-(


    http://candy.about.com/od/sugarcandy...sh_delight.htm

  6. #6
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: PING: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 17:28:37 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <4d41afb3$0$16691$[email protected] .com>,
    > > "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I need to find a recipe for a thick cherry jelly/jam/glaze that can be
    > >> applied ~3/8" thick on top of a cheesecake and solidify to provide a
    > >> chocolate enrobable surface, i.e. the topping needs to survive the brief
    > >> heat of enrobing without melting. A spreadable version would be best to
    > >> allow it to be applied to an unmolded cheesecake. It could potentially
    > >> be poured onto a cooled cheesecake before removal from the springform
    > >> pan, however it would need to set pretty quickly so the springform pan
    > >> could be removed and used on the next batch. Due to the need for the
    > >> long cool down cycle of the cheesecake production will already be
    > >> somewhat slow, fortunately we will be doing this in 4" springform pans,
    > >> so that should reduce the required cool down time vs. the typical 9"
    > >> pans. We plan to try making some prototypes this Saturday BTW.
    > >>
    > >> Thanks,
    > >>
    > >> Pete C.

    > >
    > >Pete, I haven't a clue. I'm very sorry. What kind of enrobing are you
    > >doing? What if you just spread jam generously on top and started with
    > >that? Jelly will only lead to misery, I fear: It should be stiff to
    > >start with and if you were to melt it down and then pour it, you're left
    > >with the problem of hot or warm jelly and then you're going to involve
    > >chocolate on top of it. I don't see a happy ending there.
    > >
    > >Sorry to be of no help for you. :-(

    >
    > http://candy.about.com/od/sugarcandy...sh_delight.htm


    I have a recipe for something akin to Applets and Cotlets. I can't see
    the Turkish Delight stuff on top of Pete's cheesecake. :-( The
    consistency is all wrong.

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    Pepparkakor particulars posted 11-29-2010;
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller

  7. #7
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: PING: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert... + recipe

    In article <4d420430$0$13784$[email protected] .com>,
    "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > >
    > > In article <4d41afb3$0$16691$[email protected] .com>,
    > > "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > I need to find a recipe for a thick cherry jelly/jam/glaze that can be
    > > > applied ~3/8" thick on top of a cheesecake and solidify to provide a
    > > > chocolate enrobable surface, i.e. the topping needs to survive the brief
    > > > heat of enrobing without melting. A spreadable version would be best to
    > > > allow it to be applied to an unmolded cheesecake. It could potentially
    > > > be poured onto a cooled cheesecake before removal from the springform
    > > > pan, however it would need to set pretty quickly so the springform pan
    > > > could be removed and used on the next batch. Due to the need for the
    > > > long cool down cycle of the cheesecake production will already be
    > > > somewhat slow, fortunately we will be doing this in 4" springform pans,
    > > > so that should reduce the required cool down time vs. the typical 9"
    > > > pans. We plan to try making some prototypes this Saturday BTW.
    > > >
    > > > Thanks,
    > > >
    > > > Pete C.

    > >
    > > Pete, I haven't a clue. I'm very sorry. What kind of enrobing are you
    > > doing? What if you just spread jam generously on top and started with
    > > that? Jelly will only lead to misery, I fear: It should be stiff to
    > > start with and if you were to melt it down and then pour it, you're left
    > > with the problem of hot or warm jelly and then you're going to involve
    > > chocolate on top of it. I don't see a happy ending there.
    > >
    > > Sorry to be of no help for you. :-(

    >
    > Are you familiar with the jelly filled chocolates as in the typical
    > sampler, valentine's heart boxes, etc? That is essentially what I'm
    > looking for.
    >
    > As for the jelly, it could be poured into the springform pans on top of
    > the cooled cheesecake, as long as it will harden sufficiently when it
    > has cooled (15 min in fridge?) so that the springform pan can be removed
    > leaving the molded jelly layer on top of the cheesecake.
    >
    > For the enrobing I'm expecting the refrigerated (or even frozen) jelly
    > topped cheesecake to be placed on a wire rack and have dark chocolate
    > poured over it to enrobe it, then the chocolate will harden after which
    > it will be decorated. If they can chocolate coat a Klondike ice cream
    > bar, I expect I should be able to coat a jelly topped cheesecake.
    >
    > The end result should be a chocolate shell with a cherry jelly layer
    > over a creamy cheesecake layer for something reminiscent of a chocolate
    > covered cherry. The level and smooth top surface will allow for
    > decoration, and these are actually heart shaped 4" springform pans.



    Allrighty, then. I'm thinking jelly may mean two different things to
    us, Pete. Let me have a looksee in my files. Okay, not much there but
    a quick search for "pectin candy" turned up this from
    http://cookeatshare.com/recipes/stra...e-fruit-502718
    There are pictures on the site.
    Strawberry Lemon Pate de Fruit
    Basic recipe from Chocolates and Confections, Peter Greweling
    Flavor combo by The Spiced Life

    1 lb of lemon juice and strawberry puree--see directions for how to
    measure
    zest of 1 large lemon
    24 oz (3 cups) granulated sugar
    6 oz (2 3-oz envelopes) liquid fruit pectin (Sure Jell or Certo brand in
    the USA).
    juice of half a lemon (if experimenting with other fruit purees, be sure
    to use 1 tablesp0on minimum with any fruit puree as the acid is
    necessary)
    additional sugar for coating

    Spray a 9X9 baking pan with oil and then line it with plastic wrap.
    Lightly oil it again. Bunch the plastic at the tops of the pan so that
    the plastic wrap will not stretch and rip from the weight of the jellies
    (wish I had taken a picture of this--sorry!). Smooth the bottom so that
    there are as few air pockets as possible. Set aside.

    Set up a food processor or blender and place it on a scale. Grate the
    zest of one lemon into it. Squeeze the juice of 1 1/2 large and juicy
    lemons into it (use more lemons if your lemons are dry or small--this is
    basically to taste, i.e., how much lemon do you want in your
    strawberry?). Then add strawberries to reach one pound (16 oz); I
    recommend using frozen if you are off season. Puree until smooth.

    Open the pectin packets and place them next to the stove (I use a deep
    but narrow bowl to prevent them from spilling).

    Combine the puree and 3 cups of sugar in a 4 qt heavy saucepan
    (Greweling says you can use 2 qt but mine boiled over). Attach a
    thermometer and stir over medium high heat. Keep stirring until the
    fruit sugar mix reaches 238 F. Be sure to stir constantly to prevent the
    fruit from scorching on the bottom of the pan; it is best to use a
    silicone spatula to continually scrape at the bottom of the pan.

    When the puree reaches 238 F, add the pectin and return to a boil, still
    stirring. Stir at a boil for 1 minute.

    After the minute is up, turn off the heat and add the juice from the
    remaining half lemon (at least 1 tablespoon). Pour and scrape the puree
    into the prepared pan. Sprinkle a thin layer of sugar onto the jelly
    while it is still hot. Set aside to cool completely.

    When the jelly is cool, invert it onto a wooden cutting board and then
    remove the plastic wrap. Use an oiled chef's knife to slice the jelly
    into squares (or whatever shape you want) and then roll the individual
    pieces in more sugar. Store in a sealed container.

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    Pepparkakor particulars posted 11-29-2010;
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller

  8. #8
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: PING: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...

    On 1/27/2011 6:44 PM, Pete C. wrote:

    > As for the jelly, it could be poured into the springform pans on top of
    > the cooled cheesecake, as long as it will harden sufficiently when it
    > has cooled (15 min in fridge?) so that the springform pan can be removed
    > leaving the molded jelly layer on top of the cheesecake.


    I've never done what you're trying to do, but if you freeze it with the
    jam spread on, then add the chocolate when the whole thing is frozen, it
    might work. I've frosted many many layer cakes in a frozen state and
    they come out beautifully.


  9. #9
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: PING: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...


    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    > > On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 17:28:37 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > >In article <4d41afb3$0$16691$[email protected] .com>,
    > > > "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > >> I need to find a recipe for a thick cherry jelly/jam/glaze that can be
    > > >> applied ~3/8" thick on top of a cheesecake and solidify to provide a
    > > >> chocolate enrobable surface, i.e. the topping needs to survive the brief
    > > >> heat of enrobing without melting. A spreadable version would be best to
    > > >> allow it to be applied to an unmolded cheesecake. It could potentially
    > > >> be poured onto a cooled cheesecake before removal from the springform
    > > >> pan, however it would need to set pretty quickly so the springform pan
    > > >> could be removed and used on the next batch. Due to the need for the
    > > >> long cool down cycle of the cheesecake production will already be
    > > >> somewhat slow, fortunately we will be doing this in 4" springform pans,
    > > >> so that should reduce the required cool down time vs. the typical 9"
    > > >> pans. We plan to try making some prototypes this Saturday BTW.
    > > >>
    > > >> Thanks,
    > > >>
    > > >> Pete C.
    > > >
    > > >Pete, I haven't a clue. I'm very sorry. What kind of enrobing are you
    > > >doing? What if you just spread jam generously on top and started with
    > > >that? Jelly will only lead to misery, I fear: It should be stiff to
    > > >start with and if you were to melt it down and then pour it, you're left
    > > >with the problem of hot or warm jelly and then you're going to involve
    > > >chocolate on top of it. I don't see a happy ending there.
    > > >
    > > >Sorry to be of no help for you. :-(

    > >
    > > http://candy.about.com/od/sugarcandy...sh_delight.htm

    >
    > I have a recipe for something akin to Applets and Cotlets. I can't see
    > the Turkish Delight stuff on top of Pete's cheesecake. :-( The
    > consistency is all wrong.


    Yea, what I need is something that when set is relatively soft, but not
    really flowable. Something that when chilled will hold up to the brief
    heat from the chocolate enrobing. I think basically a bit thicker than
    typical jam/jelly. Can I use a standard jam/jelly recipe and increase
    the pectin to get that thicker consistency? Not having made much in the
    way of jam or jelly, I'm just not real familiar with working with
    pectin.

  10. #10
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...

    "Janet" <[email protected]> wrote:
    -snip-
    >If you are wedded to the idea of cherry, here is a recipe for cherry jam
    >from one of my many preserving books that sounds good. (You might want to
    >consider mashing the cherries a bit while cooking to achieve a smoother
    >consistency...I am also concerned about whether this will set thickly enough
    >for you. The lemon juice helps, but if you chop up the juiced lemons and put
    >them in the bag with the cherry pits, it will boost the pectin level.)
    >
    >2 pounds cherries
    >3 cups sugar
    >1 lemon
    >2Tbs Kirsch
    >
    >Rinse, stem, and pit the cherries. Juice the lemon and reserve juice.
    >Roughly chop the juiced lemons and tie with the cherry pits in a muslin
    >bag.Simmer the cherries and pits/lemon in 2 tablespoons of water until
    >cherries are soft, about 15 minutes. Remove the bag of pits, stir in sugar
    >and lemon juice, and rapidly boil until set, about 15 minutes longer. At the
    >last minute, stir in the kirsch, 1 tablespoon at a time, then remove at once
    >from heat. Yields about 5 cups.
    >



    I just started praying for a crop of cherries big enough that I can
    get 2 lbs before the squirrels. . . That looks like my kind of
    recipe. I might buy some just to play with the recipe-- but fresh
    from the back yard would suit me better.

    Thanks-
    Jim

  11. #11
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: PING: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...

    On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 20:02:45 -0600, "Pete C." <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >>
    >> > On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 17:28:37 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    >> > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> > >In article <4d41afb3$0$16691$[email protected] .com>,
    >> > > "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> > >
    >> > >> I need to find a recipe for a thick cherry jelly/jam/glaze that can be
    >> > >> applied ~3/8" thick on top of a cheesecake and solidify to provide a
    >> > >> chocolate enrobable surface, i.e. the topping needs to survive the brief
    >> > >> heat of enrobing without melting. A spreadable version would be best to
    >> > >> allow it to be applied to an unmolded cheesecake. It could potentially
    >> > >> be poured onto a cooled cheesecake before removal from the springform
    >> > >> pan, however it would need to set pretty quickly so the springform pan
    >> > >> could be removed and used on the next batch. Due to the need for the
    >> > >> long cool down cycle of the cheesecake production will already be
    >> > >> somewhat slow, fortunately we will be doing this in 4" springform pans,
    >> > >> so that should reduce the required cool down time vs. the typical 9"
    >> > >> pans. We plan to try making some prototypes this Saturday BTW.
    >> > >>
    >> > >> Thanks,
    >> > >>
    >> > >> Pete C.
    >> > >
    >> > >Pete, I haven't a clue. I'm very sorry. What kind of enrobing are you
    >> > >doing? What if you just spread jam generously on top and started with
    >> > >that? Jelly will only lead to misery, I fear: It should be stiff to
    >> > >start with and if you were to melt it down and then pour it, you're left
    >> > >with the problem of hot or warm jelly and then you're going to involve
    >> > >chocolate on top of it. I don't see a happy ending there.
    >> > >
    >> > >Sorry to be of no help for you. :-(
    >> >
    >> > http://candy.about.com/od/sugarcandy...sh_delight.htm

    >>
    >> I can't see the Turkish Delight stuff on top of Pete's cheesecake. :-(
    >> The consistency is all wrong.

    >
    >Yea, what I need is something that when set is relatively soft, but not
    >really flowable. Something that when chilled will hold up to the brief
    >heat from the chocolate enrobing. I think basically a bit thicker than
    >typical jam/jelly. Can I use a standard jam/jelly recipe and increase
    >the pectin to get that thicker consistency? Not having made much in the
    >way of jam or jelly, I'm just not real familiar with working with
    >pectin.


    Try the Turkish delight, it can be made any flavor, any color, and it
    can be made firmer or softer. Don't pay any attention to Barb'
    negativeity, she has obviously never worked with Turkish delight.

  12. #12
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...


    Janet wrote:
    >
    > Pete C. wrote:
    > > I need to find a recipe for a thick cherry jelly/jam/glaze that can be
    > > applied ~3/8" thick on top of a cheesecake and solidify to provide a
    > > chocolate enrobable surface, i.e. the topping needs to survive the
    > > brief heat of enrobing without melting. A spreadable version would be
    > > best to allow it to be applied to an unmolded cheesecake. It could
    > > potentially be poured onto a cooled cheesecake before removal from
    > > the springform pan, however it would need to set pretty quickly so
    > > the springform pan could be removed and used on the next batch. Due
    > > to the need for the long cool down cycle of the cheesecake production
    > > will already be somewhat slow, fortunately we will be doing this in
    > > 4" springform pans, so that should reduce the required cool down time
    > > vs. the typical 9" pans. We plan to try making some prototypes this
    > > Saturday BTW.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Pete C.

    >
    > Personally, I would infinitely prefer the texture and flavor of a nice,
    > thick tart jam in this situation. I think encountering a cold jelly on top
    > of the cheesecake would be nasty. A jam should have no problem standing up
    > to the 86-89F heat of melted chocolate.


    Who said anything about cold jelly? The product will likely be chilled
    for enrobing, but will be served at room temperature. Jam and jelly are
    kind of the same thing like OJ with and without pulp.

    >
    > Are you sure you want to use cherry? If the cherries are left whole, it will
    > have a bumpy surface.


    I don't think I'd leave then whole certainly, a cherry pure perhaps.

    > I'd actually be inclined to go with apricot or, if you
    > want something red, a tart seedless raspberry jam, which blends extremely
    > well with cheesecake. Rose Levy Beranbaum has a recipe for cheesecake with
    > an apricot swirl in it in The Cake Bible that is divine.


    Cherry is kind of required to make the "chocolate covered cherry"
    likeness, and also more appropriate for a VD item. These are heart
    shaped BTW.

  13. #13
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...

    On Fri, 28 Jan 2011 07:55:29 -0500, Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >"Janet" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>here is a recipe for cherry jam
    >>
    >>2 pounds cherries
    >>3 cups sugar
    >>1 lemon
    >>2Tbs Kirsch
    >>
    >>Rinse, stem, and pit the cherries. Juice the lemon and reserve juice.
    >>Roughly chop the juiced lemons and tie with the cherry pits in a muslin
    >>bag.Simmer the cherries and pits/lemon in 2 tablespoons of water until
    >>cherries are soft, about 15 minutes. Remove the bag of pits, stir in sugar
    >>and lemon juice, and rapidly boil until set, about 15 minutes longer. At the
    >>last minute, stir in the kirsch, 1 tablespoon at a time, then remove at once
    >>from heat. Yields about 5 cups.

    >
    >
    >I just started praying for a crop of cherries big enough that I can
    >get 2 lbs before the squirrels. . .


    Netting is cheap.

  14. #14
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...

    Pete C. wrote:

    >> Personally, I would infinitely prefer the texture and flavor of a
    >> nice, thick tart jam in this situation. I think encountering a cold
    >> jelly on top of the cheesecake would be nasty. A jam should have no
    >> problem standing up to the 86-89F heat of melted chocolate.

    >
    > Who said anything about cold jelly? The product will likely be chilled
    > for enrobing, but will be served at room temperature. Jam and jelly
    > are kind of the same thing like OJ with and without pulp.


    Not to me, and I've made plenty of both. Jelly is firm and gelid, even at
    room temperature. Jam is not. I guess I assumed that because it was
    cheesecake it would be served at least somewhat chilled. But whether
    chilled or room temp, I would still prefer a jam texture in this instance!
    But hey, it's your dish. <G>

    >
    >>
    >> Are you sure you want to use cherry? If the cherries are left whole,
    >> it will have a bumpy surface.

    >
    > I don't think I'd leave then whole certainly, a cherry pure perhaps.


    That would be good. You could probably use the recipe I gave you and do a
    little pureeing in the pot with a stick blender after the phase where the
    cherries are cooked to soften. The recipe says that the pits add to the
    cherry flavor, BTW, which I think would help you.

    >> I'd actually be inclined to go with apricot or, if you
    >> want something red, a tart seedless raspberry jam, which blends
    >> extremely well with cheesecake. Rose Levy Beranbaum has a recipe for
    >> cheesecake with an apricot swirl in it in The Cake Bible that is
    >> divine.

    >
    > Cherry is kind of required to make the "chocolate covered cherry"
    > likeness, and also more appropriate for a VD item. These are heart
    > shaped BTW.


    Got that. Anyway, hope the recipe helps.



  15. #15
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...

    On Fri, 28 Jan 2011 08:36:53 -0600, "Pete C." <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >Janet wrote:
    >>
    >> Pete C. wrote:
    >> > I need to find a recipe for a thick cherry jelly/jam/glaze that can be
    >> > applied ~3/8" thick on top of a cheesecake and solidify to provide a
    >> > chocolate enrobable surface, i.e. the topping needs to survive the
    >> > brief heat of enrobing without melting. A spreadable version would be
    >> > best to allow it to be applied to an unmolded cheesecake. It could
    >> > potentially be poured onto a cooled cheesecake before removal from
    >> > the springform pan, however it would need to set pretty quickly so
    >> > the springform pan could be removed and used on the next batch. Due
    >> > to the need for the long cool down cycle of the cheesecake production
    >> > will already be somewhat slow, fortunately we will be doing this in
    >> > 4" springform pans, so that should reduce the required cool down time
    >> > vs. the typical 9" pans. We plan to try making some prototypes this
    >> > Saturday BTW.
    >> >
    >> > Thanks,
    >> >
    >> > Pete C.

    >>
    >> Personally, I would infinitely prefer the texture and flavor of a nice,
    >> thick tart jam in this situation. I think encountering a cold jelly on top
    >> of the cheesecake would be nasty. A jam should have no problem standing up
    >> to the 86-89F heat of melted chocolate.

    >
    >Who said anything about cold jelly? The product will likely be chilled
    >for enrobing, but will be served at room temperature.


    Cheesecake is usually served chilled.

  16. #16
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...


    Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    > On Fri, 28 Jan 2011 07:55:29 -0500, Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >"Janet" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >>here is a recipe for cherry jam
    > >>
    > >>2 pounds cherries
    > >>3 cups sugar
    > >>1 lemon
    > >>2Tbs Kirsch
    > >>
    > >>Rinse, stem, and pit the cherries. Juice the lemon and reserve juice.
    > >>Roughly chop the juiced lemons and tie with the cherry pits in a muslin
    > >>bag.Simmer the cherries and pits/lemon in 2 tablespoons of water until
    > >>cherries are soft, about 15 minutes. Remove the bag of pits, stir in sugar
    > >>and lemon juice, and rapidly boil until set, about 15 minutes longer. At the
    > >>last minute, stir in the kirsch, 1 tablespoon at a time, then remove at once
    > >>from heat. Yields about 5 cups.

    > >
    > >
    > >I just started praying for a crop of cherries big enough that I can
    > >get 2 lbs before the squirrels. . .

    >
    > Netting is cheap.


    Netting works for birds, for squerrils you'd need wire mesh, and a lot
    of it for 100% coverage. That or a good pellet gun and a lot of free
    time.

  17. #17
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...


    Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    > Cheesecake is usually served chilled.


    Yes, that is common, however it is not the best. Ideal serving
    temperature is just a bit below room temperature. Like most foods,
    flavor is greatly enhanced when the item is not cold.

  18. #18
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...

    "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:
    -snip-
    >
    >Netting works for birds, for squerrils you'd need wire mesh, and a lot
    >of it for 100% coverage. That or a good pellet gun and a lot of free
    >time.


    Between the pellet gun and self-re-loading squirrel trap, I think I've
    got them under control for the time being--

    I'm also talking nice to the local fox, coyote & Lynx population.

    Jim

  19. #19
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Janet" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Pete C. wrote:
    > > I need to find a recipe for a thick cherry jelly/jam/glaze that can be
    > > applied ~3/8" thick on top of a cheesecake and solidify to provide a
    > > chocolate enrobable surface, i.e. the topping needs to survive the
    > > brief heat of enrobing without melting. A spreadable version would be
    > > best to allow it to be applied to an unmolded cheesecake. It could
    > > potentially be poured onto a cooled cheesecake before removal from
    > > the springform pan, however it would need to set pretty quickly so
    > > the springform pan could be removed and used on the next batch. Due
    > > to the need for the long cool down cycle of the cheesecake production
    > > will already be somewhat slow, fortunately we will be doing this in
    > > 4" springform pans, so that should reduce the required cool down time
    > > vs. the typical 9" pans. We plan to try making some prototypes this
    > > Saturday BTW.
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Pete C.

    >
    > Personally, I would infinitely prefer the texture and flavor of a nice,
    > thick tart jam in this situation. I think encountering a cold jelly on top
    > of the cheesecake would be nasty.


    Hear, hear!
    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    Pepparkakor particulars posted 11-29-2010;
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller

  20. #20
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: PING: Ms. Jammin' jam/jelly expert...

    In article <4d42247c$0$13777$[email protected] .com>,
    "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    > >
    > > > On Thu, 27 Jan 2011 17:28:37 -0600, Melba's Jammin'
    > > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > >In article <4d41afb3$0$16691$[email protected] .com>,
    > > > > "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > >> I need to find a recipe for a thick cherry jelly/jam/glaze that can be
    > > > >> applied ~3/8" thick on top of a cheesecake and solidify to provide a
    > > > >> chocolate enrobable surface, i.e. the topping needs to survive the
    > > > >> brief
    > > > >> heat of enrobing without melting. A spreadable version would be best
    > > > >> to
    > > > >> allow it to be applied to an unmolded cheesecake. It could potentially
    > > > >> be poured onto a cooled cheesecake before removal from the springform
    > > > >> pan, however it would need to set pretty quickly so the springform pan
    > > > >> could be removed and used on the next batch. Due to the need for the
    > > > >> long cool down cycle of the cheesecake production will already be
    > > > >> somewhat slow, fortunately we will be doing this in 4" springform
    > > > >> pans,
    > > > >> so that should reduce the required cool down time vs. the typical 9"
    > > > >> pans. We plan to try making some prototypes this Saturday BTW.
    > > > >>
    > > > >> Thanks,
    > > > >>
    > > > >> Pete C.
    > > > >
    > > > >Pete, I haven't a clue. I'm very sorry. What kind of enrobing are you
    > > > >doing? What if you just spread jam generously on top and started with
    > > > >that? Jelly will only lead to misery, I fear: It should be stiff to
    > > > >start with and if you were to melt it down and then pour it, you're left
    > > > >with the problem of hot or warm jelly and then you're going to involve
    > > > >chocolate on top of it. I don't see a happy ending there.
    > > > >
    > > > >Sorry to be of no help for you. :-(
    > > >
    > > > http://candy.about.com/od/sugarcandy...sh_delight.htm

    > >
    > > I have a recipe for something akin to Applets and Cotlets. I can't see
    > > the Turkish Delight stuff on top of Pete's cheesecake. :-( The
    > > consistency is all wrong.

    >
    > Yea, what I need is something that when set is relatively soft, but not
    > really flowable. Something that when chilled will hold up to the brief
    > heat from the chocolate enrobing. I think basically a bit thicker than
    > typical jam/jelly. Can I use a standard jam/jelly recipe and increase
    > the pectin to get that thicker consistency? Not having made much in the
    > way of jam or jelly, I'm just not real familiar with working with
    > pectin.


    <grin> And while I have lots of experience, I'm not a food scientist.
    The set for a preserve is, basically, determined by "a friendly
    handshake" between acid, pectin, and sugar. There are lots of folks who
    will not add commercial pectin to their jampot, but will simply cook
    fruit and sugar until it is thick. Thick is not the same as jelled.

    What, exactly, are you planning to use for your cherries? Frozen?
    Frozen pitted? Sweet? Frozen, pitted, sour are available but only from
    an orchard, AFAIK. (All that really means is that I have never seen
    them around here. I get mine from Seaquist Orchards in Door County,
    Wisconsin).

    Pete, are you in the US? If so, contact me by email and I'll send you a
    jar of the cherry jam that the Gedney folks here make from my recipe.
    You can putz with that. You won't get it by this weekend, though.

    If you want to do that, put a dot between my first and last name in the
    email address that's with this post. Or contact me via the 'email me'
    on my website, link in sig line; the link is at the bottom of the home
    page.

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller

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