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Thread: Ping: jmcquown re: Appendix

  1. #1
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Ping: jmcquown re: Appendix

    I tried to reply under Andy's post but the stupid quote that I put tried to
    attach a binary file so it wouldn't send. Hopefully this will work. I have
    copied and pasted:

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "Julie Bove" wrote in message news:k41m45$242$[email protected]..
    >
    >
    > "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> OT: Bad Idea: Gummy children's multivitamins!
    >>
    >> Gummy multivitamins? If it were the case, never in my house.
    >>
    >> Unless under lock and key, dispensed by parents, I could
    >> picture kids eating them like the famous candy and terribly
    >> vitamin overdosing!
    >>
    >> Maybe if it's a low RDA multivitamin not a one-a-day
    >> supplement.
    >>
    >> I do realize it's an OK delivery system if they can't swallow
    >> pills.
    >>
    >> They stopped short of "Gummy Bears" but it still seemed close
    >> enough to bother me.
    >>
    >> I took chewable Flinstones vitamins for a brief while when I
    >> noticed they decomposed at a fast rate.
    >>
    >> I now take Centrum 50+ berry chewable "horsepill" supplement
    >> (100+% RDA).
    >>
    >> I still wouldn't give my kids multivitamins without a doctor's
    >> approval of amounts and age/growth needs.
    >>
    >> The only acceptable exception would be if they ate at
    >> McDonalds tor BK hree times a day. Not under MY roof.
    >>
    >> </rant>

    >
    > Heh! My daughter hates gummy things and when given a sample of one of
    > those
    > at the health food store was most displeased. I tried another brand and
    > would find them hidden all over the house. Thankfully she could swallow
    > pills at age two! So giving her swallowables was not a problem. She
    > didn't
    > regularly take vitamins until late last school year and at my insistence.
    > I
    > did try to give them to her before but she was not so good at taking them
    > and I would often forget. But since she does have lowered immunity and
    > did
    > test as deficient in a few things she is required to take them now.
    > Especially the probiotic because she is missing her appendix.
    > *************
    > What in the hell does her appendix have to do with anything?! The
    > appendix
    > is a completely useless organ. Probiotics are (allegedly) for
    > colon/digestive tract health. The appendix has nothing to do with it.


    Nope. Keep up with the times. Just like how you think you can't prove if
    food is organic or not, even though it has to be certified. *sigh* Lemme
    find a link.

    Gotta scroll down for this one but I shall quote it.

    http://www.jonbarron.org/natural-hea...biotics-part-1

    "Probiotics and your appendix
    Before we wrap up today's alternative health, there's a fun item that
    recently came to light. A new study has found a potential connection between
    your appendix and beneficial bacteria in your intestinal tract. It seems the
    appendix may not be quite as useless as doctors have assumed all these
    years. Actually, given enough time, it seems that doctors are finding that
    no part of the body is useless -- that all parts seem to have important (if
    sometimes obscure) health functions. (Actually, that sentence alone could be
    worth an entire newsletter when you think about it.)

    So what is this newly hypothesized function of the appendix, its raison
    d'Ítre?

    Well, according to William Parker, Ph.D., assistant professor of
    experimental surgery, who conducted the analysis in collaboration with R.
    Randal Bollinger, M.D., Ph.D., "While there is no smoking gun, the abundance
    of circumstantial evidence makes a strong case for the role of the appendix
    as a place where the good bacteria can live safe and undisturbed until they
    are needed." In other words, it looks like the human appendix serves as a
    "safe house" for beneficial bacteria to grow and remain in reserve for such
    time as they may be needed in "re-inoculating" the colon in the event that
    the contents of the intestinal tract are purged following exposure to a
    pathogen. For example, the reserve of beneficial bacteria in the appendix
    can help the body ride out a bout of diarrhea that completely evacuates the
    intestines, thus flushing all beneficial bacteria from the gut.

    It should be noted that researchers have known for some time the appendix
    contains immune system tissue. It now appears that the immune system cells
    found in the appendix are there to protect, rather than harm, the good
    bacteria.

    In addition, this new research confirms the fact that in a healthy
    intestinal tract, beneficial bacteria are instrumental in creating a biofilm
    comprised of microbes, mucous, and immune system molecules that coats the
    lining of the intestines, thus literally preventing harmful bacteria from
    taking root. As Dr. Parker says, "Our studies have indicated that the immune
    system protects and nourishes the colonies of microbes living in the
    biofilm. By protecting these good microbes, the harmful microbes have no
    place to locate. We have also shown that biofilms are most pronounced in the
    appendix and their prevalence decreases moving away from it."



    http://probiotics.org/amazing-facts/



    http://www.healthnowmedical.com/blog...-the-appendix/



    And there are tons more if you want to google it or bing it or do as I
    do...swagbuck it!



  2. #2
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Ping: jmcquown re: Appendix

    On Thursday, September 27, 2012 12:41:55 PM UTC-4, Julie Bove wrote:
    > I tried to reply under Andy's post but the stupid quote that I put tried to
    >
    > attach a binary file so it wouldn't send. Hopefully this will work. I have
    >
    > copied and pasted:
    >
    >
    >
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    > > "Julie Bove" wrote in message news:k41m45$242$[email protected]..

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    >
    > > news:[email protected]..

    >
    > >> OT: Bad Idea: Gummy children's multivitamins!

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> Gummy multivitamins? If it were the case, never in my house.

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> Unless under lock and key, dispensed by parents, I could

    >
    > >> picture kids eating them like the famous candy and terribly

    >
    > >> vitamin overdosing!

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> Maybe if it's a low RDA multivitamin not a one-a-day

    >
    > >> supplement.

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> I do realize it's an OK delivery system if they can't swallow

    >
    > >> pills.

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> They stopped short of "Gummy Bears" but it still seemed close

    >
    > >> enough to bother me.

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> I took chewable Flinstones vitamins for a brief while when I

    >
    > >> noticed they decomposed at a fast rate.

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> I now take Centrum 50+ berry chewable "horsepill" supplement

    >
    > >> (100+% RDA).

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> I still wouldn't give my kids multivitamins without a doctor's

    >
    > >> approval of amounts and age/growth needs.

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> The only acceptable exception would be if they ate at

    >
    > >> McDonalds tor BK hree times a day. Not under MY roof.

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> </rant>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Heh! My daughter hates gummy things and when given a sample of one of

    >
    > > those

    >
    > > at the health food store was most displeased. I tried another brand and

    >
    > > would find them hidden all over the house. Thankfully she could swallow

    >
    > > pills at age two! So giving her swallowables was not a problem. She

    >
    > > didn't

    >
    > > regularly take vitamins until late last school year and at my insistence.

    >
    > > I

    >
    > > did try to give them to her before but she was not so good at taking them

    >
    > > and I would often forget. But since she does have lowered immunity and

    >
    > > did

    >
    > > test as deficient in a few things she is required to take them now.

    >
    > > Especially the probiotic because she is missing her appendix.

    >
    > > *************

    >
    > > What in the hell does her appendix have to do with anything?! The

    >
    > > appendix

    >
    > > is a completely useless organ. Probiotics are (allegedly) for

    >
    > > colon/digestive tract health. The appendix has nothing to do with it.

    >
    >
    >
    > Nope. Keep up with the times. Just like how you think you can't prove if
    >
    > food is organic or not, even though it has to be certified. *sigh* Lemme
    >
    > find a link.
    >
    >
    >
    > Gotta scroll down for this one but I shall quote it.
    >
    >
    >
    > http://www.jonbarron.org/natural-hea...biotics-part-1
    >
    >
    >
    > "Probiotics and your appendix
    >
    > Before we wrap up today's alternative health, there's a fun item that
    >
    > recently came to light. A new study has found a potential connection between
    >
    > your appendix and beneficial bacteria in your intestinal tract. It seems the
    >
    > appendix may not be quite as useless as doctors have assumed all these
    >
    > years. Actually, given enough time, it seems that doctors are finding that
    >
    > no part of the body is useless -- that all parts seem to have important (if
    >
    > sometimes obscure) health functions. (Actually, that sentence alone couldbe
    >
    > worth an entire newsletter when you think about it.)
    >
    >
    >
    > So what is this newly hypothesized function of the appendix, its raison
    >
    > d'Ítre?
    >
    >
    >
    > Well, according to William Parker, Ph.D., assistant professor of
    >
    > experimental surgery, who conducted the analysis in collaboration with R.
    >
    > Randal Bollinger, M.D., Ph.D., "While there is no smoking gun, the abundance
    >
    > of circumstantial evidence makes a strong case for the role of the appendix
    >
    > as a place where the good bacteria can live safe and undisturbed until they
    >
    > are needed." In other words, it looks like the human appendix serves as a
    >
    > "safe house" for beneficial bacteria to grow and remain in reserve for such
    >
    > time as they may be needed in "re-inoculating" the colon in the event that
    >
    > the contents of the intestinal tract are purged following exposure to a
    >
    > pathogen. For example, the reserve of beneficial bacteria in the appendix
    >
    > can help the body ride out a bout of diarrhea that completely evacuates the
    >
    > intestines, thus flushing all beneficial bacteria from the gut.
    >
    >
    >
    > It should be noted that researchers have known for some time the appendix
    >
    > contains immune system tissue. It now appears that the immune system cells
    >
    > found in the appendix are there to protect, rather than harm, the good
    >
    > bacteria.
    >
    >
    >
    > In addition, this new research confirms the fact that in a healthy
    >
    > intestinal tract, beneficial bacteria are instrumental in creating a biofilm
    >
    > comprised of microbes, mucous, and immune system molecules that coats the
    >
    > lining of the intestines, thus literally preventing harmful bacteria from
    >
    > taking root. As Dr. Parker says, "Our studies have indicated that the immune
    >
    > system protects and nourishes the colonies of microbes living in the
    >
    > biofilm. By protecting these good microbes, the harmful microbes have no
    >
    > place to locate. We have also shown that biofilms are most pronounced in the
    >
    > appendix and their prevalence decreases moving away from it."
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > http://probiotics.org/amazing-facts/
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > http://www.healthnowmedical.com/blog...-the-appendix/
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > And there are tons more if you want to google it or bing it or do as I
    >
    > do...swagbuck it!


    "the abundance of circumstantial evidence makes a strong case for ". Wow. How compelling. Science at its finest.

  3. #3
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: jmcquown re: Appendix

    Cool - I don't have an appendix, mine having been removed ~20 years ago.
    Reading this makes me glad I take probiotics regularly.

    -S

    Julie Bove wrote:

    > Nope. Keep up with the times. Just like how you think you can't
    > prove if food is organic or not, even though it has to be certified.
    > *sigh* Lemme find a link.
    >
    > Gotta scroll down for this one but I shall quote it.
    >
    > http://www.jonbarron.org/natural-hea...biotics-part-1
    >
    > "Probiotics and your appendix
    > Before we wrap up today's alternative health, there's a fun item that
    > recently came to light. A new study has found a potential connection
    > between your appendix and beneficial bacteria in your intestinal
    > tract. It seems the appendix may not be quite as useless as doctors
    > have assumed all these years. Actually, given enough time, it seems
    > that doctors are finding that no part of the body is useless -- that
    > all parts seem to have important (if sometimes obscure) health
    > functions. (Actually, that sentence alone could be worth an entire
    > newsletter when you think about it.)
    > So what is this newly hypothesized function of the appendix, its
    > raison d'Ítre?
    >
    > Well, according to William Parker, Ph.D., assistant professor of
    > experimental surgery, who conducted the analysis in collaboration
    > with R. Randal Bollinger, M.D., Ph.D., "While there is no smoking
    > gun, the abundance of circumstantial evidence makes a strong case for
    > the role of the appendix as a place where the good bacteria can live
    > safe and undisturbed until they are needed." In other words, it looks
    > like the human appendix serves as a "safe house" for beneficial
    > bacteria to grow and remain in reserve for such time as they may be
    > needed in "re-inoculating" the colon in the event that the contents
    > of the intestinal tract are purged following exposure to a pathogen.
    > For example, the reserve of beneficial bacteria in the appendix can
    > help the body ride out a bout of diarrhea that completely evacuates
    > the intestines, thus flushing all beneficial bacteria from the gut.
    > It should be noted that researchers have known for some time the
    > appendix contains immune system tissue. It now appears that the
    > immune system cells found in the appendix are there to protect,
    > rather than harm, the good bacteria.
    >
    > In addition, this new research confirms the fact that in a healthy
    > intestinal tract, beneficial bacteria are instrumental in creating a
    > biofilm comprised of microbes, mucous, and immune system molecules
    > that coats the lining of the intestines, thus literally preventing
    > harmful bacteria from taking root. As Dr. Parker says, "Our studies
    > have indicated that the immune system protects and nourishes the
    > colonies of microbes living in the biofilm. By protecting these good
    > microbes, the harmful microbes have no place to locate. We have also
    > shown that biofilms are most pronounced in the appendix and their
    > prevalence decreases moving away from it."
    >
    >
    > http://probiotics.org/amazing-facts/
    >
    >
    >
    > http://www.healthnowmedical.com/blog...-the-appendix/
    >
    >
    >
    > And there are tons more if you want to google it or bing it or do as I
    > do...swagbuck it!




  4. #4
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: jmcquown re: Appendix


    "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k424cb$f5i$[email protected]..
    > Cool - I don't have an appendix, mine having been removed ~20 years ago.
    > Reading this makes me glad I take probiotics regularly.
    >
    > -S

    Good!



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