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Thread: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

  1. #1
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    Funny thing happened! I discovered a box by my front door this afternoon.
    Turns out the element the Sears technician ordered for my oven was shipped
    to me directly! How about you email me and talk me through it? Maybe I can
    install it myself and save the service fee. And he wasn't *completely*
    convinced it needs a new thermostat, just said maybe and thought it would be
    better to go ahead and replace it. But, if I can fix this myself that would
    be ideal.

    Jill


  2. #2
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    On 23/02/2011 6:47 PM, jmcquown wrote:
    > Funny thing happened! I discovered a box by my front door this
    > afternoon. Turns out the element the Sears technician ordered for my
    > oven was shipped to me directly! How about you email me and talk me
    > through it? Maybe I can install it myself and save the service fee. And
    > he wasn't *completely* convinced it needs a new thermostat, just said
    > maybe and thought it would be better to go ahead and replace it. But, if
    > I can fix this myself that would be ideal.
    >



    It's a piece of cake, and probably the only tool you will need is a
    Phillips screw driver.


    Pull the unit out and disconnect the power cord.
    Open the door, or remove it completely to make it easier to get in
    there. Just open the door part way and slide it up on the bracket.

    There are two brackets where the element is mounted into the back wall.
    |There will be one or two screws in each. Remove them and the element
    should slide right out.

    There will be a wire attached to each end of the element. They will be
    attached either with a slip on connector or with a screw. Remove the old
    element, attach the new one, screw the bracket into place, put the door
    on, plug the oven in, push it back into place and sit back and count the
    money you just saved for five minutes work.

  3. #3
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 18:47:29 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Funny thing happened! I discovered a box by my front door this afternoon.
    >Turns out the element the Sears technician ordered for my oven was shipped
    >to me directly! How about you email me and talk me through it? Maybe I can
    >install it myself and save the service fee. And he wasn't *completely*
    >convinced it needs a new thermostat, just said maybe and thought it would be
    >better to go ahead and replace it. But, if I can fix this myself that would
    >be ideal.
    >
    >Jill


    If you have a newer stove the element may be the plugin type, otherwise you
    have to pull the stove out from the wall, pop the back off and disconnect the
    connections install the new one and rewire it. You should realize the stove is
    220V it can kill, makes sure you unplug the stove from the wall first.

  4. #4
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair


    "Stu" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 18:47:29 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Funny thing happened! I discovered a box by my front door this afternoon.
    >>Turns out the element the Sears technician ordered for my oven was shipped
    >>to me directly! How about you email me and talk me through it? Maybe I
    >>can
    >>install it myself and save the service fee. And he wasn't *completely*
    >>convinced it needs a new thermostat, just said maybe and thought it would
    >>be
    >>better to go ahead and replace it. But, if I can fix this myself that
    >>would
    >>be ideal.
    >>
    >>Jill

    >
    > If you have a newer stove the element may be the plugin type, otherwise
    > you
    > have to pull the stove out from the wall, pop the back off and disconnect
    > the
    > connections install the new one and rewire it. You should realize the
    > stove is
    > 220V it can kill, makes sure you unplug the stove from the wall first.



    It's not new, the oven came with the house which was built in 1987. And
    yes, I know to shut the power off at the breaker box. That's what the
    technician did when he came out to diagnose the problem. I just wasn't
    expecting the element he ordered to be shipped directly to me. I figured
    they'd send it to the repair shop and he'd bring it with him when he arrived
    for the appointment on March 8th. If I can install it myself I'll save
    another service charge.

    Jill


  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 18:47:29 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Funny thing happened! I discovered a box by my front door this afternoon.
    > Turns out the element the Sears technician ordered for my oven was shipped
    > to me directly! How about you email me and talk me through it? Maybe I can
    > install it myself and save the service fee. And he wasn't *completely*
    > convinced it needs a new thermostat, just said maybe and thought it would be
    > better to go ahead and replace it. But, if I can fix this myself that would
    > be ideal.
    >

    I think Boli is the one you need for that.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  6. #6
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 22:52:44 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Stu" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 18:47:29 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Funny thing happened! I discovered a box by my front door this afternoon.
    >>>Turns out the element the Sears technician ordered for my oven was shipped
    >>>to me directly! How about you email me and talk me through it? Maybe I
    >>>can
    >>>install it myself and save the service fee. And he wasn't *completely*
    >>>convinced it needs a new thermostat, just said maybe and thought it would
    >>>be
    >>>better to go ahead and replace it. But, if I can fix this myself that
    >>>would
    >>>be ideal.
    >>>
    >>>Jill

    >>
    >> If you have a newer stove the element may be the plugin type, otherwise
    >> you
    >> have to pull the stove out from the wall, pop the back off and disconnect
    >> the
    >> connections install the new one and rewire it. You should realize the
    >> stove is
    >> 220V it can kill, makes sure you unplug the stove from the wall first.

    >
    >
    >It's not new, the oven came with the house which was built in 1987. And
    >yes, I know to shut the power off at the breaker box. That's what the
    >technician did when he came out to diagnose the problem. I just wasn't
    >expecting the element he ordered to be shipped directly to me. I figured
    >they'd send it to the repair shop and he'd bring it with him when he arrived
    >for the appointment on March 8th. If I can install it myself I'll save
    >another service charge.
    >
    >Jill

    I would expect the cost of the installation trip is included in the
    total bill. If you damage the element or it does not fix the problem,
    you will probably be out more $.
    --
    Mr.E

  7. #7
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 22:52:44 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Stu" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected] ..
    >>> On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 18:47:29 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Funny thing happened! I discovered a box by my front door this
    >>>>afternoon.
    >>>>Turns out the element the Sears technician ordered for my oven was
    >>>>shipped
    >>>>to me directly! How about you email me and talk me through it? Maybe I
    >>>>can
    >>>>install it myself and save the service fee. And he wasn't *completely*
    >>>>convinced it needs a new thermostat, just said maybe and thought it
    >>>>would
    >>>>be
    >>>>better to go ahead and replace it. But, if I can fix this myself that
    >>>>would
    >>>>be ideal.
    >>>>
    >>>>Jill
    >>>
    >>> If you have a newer stove the element may be the plugin type, otherwise
    >>> you
    >>> have to pull the stove out from the wall, pop the back off and
    >>> disconnect
    >>> the
    >>> connections install the new one and rewire it. You should realize the
    >>> stove is
    >>> 220V it can kill, makes sure you unplug the stove from the wall first.

    >>
    >>
    >>It's not new, the oven came with the house which was built in 1987.
    >>I figured they'd send it to the repair shop and he'd bring it with him
    >>when he arrived
    >>for the appointment on March 8th. If I can install it myself I'll save
    >>another service charge.
    >>
    >>Jill

    > I would expect the cost of the installation trip is included in the
    > total bill. If you damage the element or it does not fix the problem,
    > you will probably be out more $.
    > --
    > Mr.E



    Guess you missed the whole stovetop cooking thread I have a home
    warranty policy that covers repair/replacement of major appliances. There's
    a $60 service fee (think "deductible") every time they send out a technician
    to diagnose/repair something. Since the stove is so old the guy didn't have
    a heating element for it in his truck. He had to order the part and set up
    another service call. That will be another $60. And he can't get back here
    until March 8th. I've already been without an oven for a couple of weeks.
    (It's weird, you don't really miss having an oven until yours suddenly
    breaks. Then all of a sudden you want to roast a chicken or bake some
    biscuits.) If I can save myself another service fee trying to install it
    myself, why not? How hard can it be? And if I somehow screw it up he can
    just order another one and I'll just pay another $60 service fee. It will
    obviously get here before he does. LOL

    Jill


  8. #8
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 18:47:29 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Funny thing happened! I discovered a box by my front door this
    >> afternoon.
    >> Turns out the element the Sears technician ordered for my oven was
    >> shipped
    >> to me directly! How about you email me and talk me through it? Maybe I
    >> can
    >> install it myself and save the service fee. And he wasn't *completely*
    >> convinced it needs a new thermostat, just said maybe and thought it would
    >> be
    >> better to go ahead and replace it. But, if I can fix this myself that
    >> would
    >> be ideal.
    >>

    > I think Boli is the one you need for that.
    >
    > --

    Where the heck is he? He needs to jump in his truck and drive right on
    down! I'll buy lunch. Or bake something

    Jill


  9. #9
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    On 24/02/2011 7:31 AM, [email protected]d wrote:

    >> It's not new, the oven came with the house which was built in 1987. And
    >> yes, I know to shut the power off at the breaker box. That's what the
    >> technician did when he came out to diagnose the problem. I just wasn't
    >> expecting the element he ordered to be shipped directly to me. I figured
    >> they'd send it to the repair shop and he'd bring it with him when he arrived
    >> for the appointment on March 8th. If I can install it myself I'll save
    >> another service charge.
    >>
    >> Jill

    > I would expect the cost of the installation trip is included in the
    > total bill. If you damage the element or it does not fix the problem,
    > you will probably be out more $.


    I would not count on the second trip being free when dealing with repair
    service that takes a week to get out to see the oven and then another
    week to get the part. I would have expected that a repairman coming out
    to fix and oven with a likely burned out element would show up with a
    supply of elements. There aren't that many sizes and shapes to deal with.

    How would you expect her to damage the element. Short of dropping it
    onto a hard floor from great height, or slamming it in a door, it would
    be hard to damage an oven element.


  10. #10
    Mr.E Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    On Thu, 24 Feb 2011 09:26:49 -0500, Dave Smith wrote:

    > On 24/02/2011 7:31 AM, Mr.E@to[email protected]d wrote:
    >
    >>> It's not new, the oven came with the house which was built in 1987.
    >>> And yes, I know to shut the power off at the breaker box. That's what
    >>> the technician did when he came out to diagnose the problem. I just
    >>> wasn't expecting the element he ordered to be shipped directly to me.
    >>> I figured they'd send it to the repair shop and he'd bring it with him
    >>> when he arrived for the appointment on March 8th. If I can install it
    >>> myself I'll save another service charge.
    >>>
    >>> Jill

    >> I would expect the cost of the installation trip is included in the
    >> total bill. If you damage the element or it does not fix the problem,
    >> you will probably be out more $.

    >
    > I would not count on the second trip being free when dealing with repair
    > service that takes a week to get out to see the oven and then another
    > week to get the part. I would have expected that a repairman coming out
    > to fix and oven with a likely burned out element would show up with a
    > supply of elements. There aren't that many sizes and shapes to deal
    > with.
    >
    > How would you expect her to damage the element. Short of dropping it
    > onto a hard floor from great height, or slamming it in a door, it would
    > be hard to damage an oven element.

    Not really- if the screw-on wire type, fairly easy to strip screw when
    tightening or easy to break off spot-welded terminal due to inadequate
    support when tightening or plugging terminal on.
    Wires that have heated many cycles tend toward being brittle also.
    Coupled with difficult access many unexpected problems can arise.


    --
    Mr.E

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    On Thu, 24 Feb 2011 09:26:03 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > > On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 18:47:29 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> Funny thing happened! I discovered a box by my front door this
    > >> afternoon.
    > >> Turns out the element the Sears technician ordered for my oven was
    > >> shipped
    > >> to me directly! How about you email me and talk me through it? Maybe I
    > >> can
    > >> install it myself and save the service fee. And he wasn't *completely*
    > >> convinced it needs a new thermostat, just said maybe and thought it would
    > >> be
    > >> better to go ahead and replace it. But, if I can fix this myself that
    > >> would
    > >> be ideal.
    > >>

    > > I think Boli is the one you need for that.
    > >
    > > --

    > Where the heck is he? He needs to jump in his truck and drive right on
    > down! I'll buy lunch. Or bake something
    >
    > Jill


    There ya go! You can turn it into an rfc mini-cook-in.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  12. #12
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    Re: [email protected]

    jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Stu" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..


    >> You should realize the
    >> stove is
    >> 220V it can kill, makes sure you unplug the stove from the wall
    >> first.



    Piggybacking...

    So 110v is safe? Durrr? 110v can kill too.

    http://www.epanorama.net/links/safety.html#electrical

    Unplug or shut down the breaker on *anything* electric before sticking your
    hands or tools into it, regardless of voltage.





  13. #13
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    On Thu, 24 Feb 2011 09:24:32 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 22:52:44 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>"Stu" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:[email protected] ...
    >>>> On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 18:47:29 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    >>>> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>Funny thing happened! I discovered a box by my front door this
    >>>>>afternoon.
    >>>>>Turns out the element the Sears technician ordered for my oven was
    >>>>>shipped
    >>>>>to me directly! How about you email me and talk me through it? Maybe I
    >>>>>can
    >>>>>install it myself and save the service fee. And he wasn't *completely*
    >>>>>convinced it needs a new thermostat, just said maybe and thought it
    >>>>>would
    >>>>>be
    >>>>>better to go ahead and replace it. But, if I can fix this myself that
    >>>>>would
    >>>>>be ideal.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Jill
    >>>>
    >>>> If you have a newer stove the element may be the plugin type, otherwise
    >>>> you
    >>>> have to pull the stove out from the wall, pop the back off and
    >>>> disconnect
    >>>> the
    >>>> connections install the new one and rewire it. You should realize the
    >>>> stove is
    >>>> 220V it can kill, makes sure you unplug the stove from the wall first.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>It's not new, the oven came with the house which was built in 1987.
    >>>I figured they'd send it to the repair shop and he'd bring it with him
    >>>when he arrived
    >>>for the appointment on March 8th. If I can install it myself I'll save
    >>>another service charge.
    >>>
    >>>Jill

    >> I would expect the cost of the installation trip is included in the
    >> total bill. If you damage the element or it does not fix the problem,
    >> you will probably be out more $.
    >> --
    >> Mr.E

    >
    >
    >Guess you missed the whole stovetop cooking thread I have a home
    >warranty policy that covers repair/replacement of major appliances. There's
    >a $60 service fee (think "deductible") every time they send out a technician
    >to diagnose/repair something. Since the stove is so old the guy didn't have
    >a heating element for it in his truck. He had to order the part and set up
    >another service call. That will be another $60. And he can't get back here
    >until March 8th. I've already been without an oven for a couple of weeks.
    >(It's weird, you don't really miss having an oven until yours suddenly
    >breaks. Then all of a sudden you want to roast a chicken or bake some
    >biscuits.) If I can save myself another service fee trying to install it
    >myself, why not? How hard can it be? And if I somehow screw it up he can
    >just order another one and I'll just pay another $60 service fee. It will
    >obviously get here before he does. LOL
    >
    >Jill


    With the type of policy you describe doing any repair yourself voids
    the warranty. Besides, the fact that you asked means you know you are
    not too steady about such things, I would definitely wait for the
    service person, you already paid for the repair by having that policy,
    that policy is not free, it's somehow figured into the cost of living
    there... nothing is "free". Stoves made some 25 years ago were not
    made with owner servicing in mind, neither are new modern stoves. I'm
    pretty good with tools but when I pay for a service policy I don't do
    it myself, what if I damage something, very easy to do... you may even
    inadvertantly set yourself up for an electrical fire! I strongly
    suggest you wait... some folks have bigger egos than brains. Actually
    I'd not put too much money into so old an electric stove, soon as you
    fix one thing something else is going to break, I'd seriously consider
    putting that repair money into new... treat yourself to brand new
    modern with all the bells and whistles.

  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    On Thu, 24 Feb 2011 07:31:28 -0500, [email protected]d wrote:

    > I would expect the cost of the installation trip is included in the
    > total bill. If you damage the element or it does not fix the problem,
    > you will probably be out more $.


    Wait just a freekin minute here. Something is not adding up... I'm
    supposed to be able to build and code computers and told that I'm "not
    willing to learn something new" because I don't want to, but Jill is
    told not to fix her oven herself or she'll be out more $$ if she
    screws it up. <not picking on you E, just sayin rfc is a bit
    schizophrenic>

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  15. #15
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    On Thu, 24 Feb 2011 10:12:14 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Re: [email protected]
    >
    >jmcquown <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Stu" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..

    >
    >>> You should realize the
    >>> stove is
    >>> 220V it can kill, makes sure you unplug the stove from the wall
    >>> first.

    >
    >
    >Piggybacking...
    >
    >So 110v is safe? Durrr? 110v can kill too.
    >
    >http://www.epanorama.net/links/safety.html#electrical
    >
    >Unplug or shut down the breaker on *anything* electric before sticking your
    >hands or tools into it, regardless of voltage.



    Your correct about the breakers, and unplug the stove on the off chance there's
    a live line looping and supplying it with Voltage.
    I've been zapped with 110V, wouldn't want to get zapped with 220V.

  16. #16
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    On Feb 23, 3:47*pm, "jmcquown" <j_mcqu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > Funny thing happened! *I discovered a box by my front door this afternoon.
    > Turns out the element the Sears technician ordered for my oven was shipped
    > to me directly! *How about you email me and talk me through it? *Maybe I can
    > install it myself and save the service fee. *And he wasn't *completely*
    > convinced it needs a new thermostat, just said maybe and thought it wouldbe
    > better to go ahead and replace it. *But, if I can fix this myself that would
    > be ideal.
    >


    If you're still hesitant after you receive responses, see if your
    stove's repair manual is online. Google the model number, part number,
    etc. I have found manuals complete with line drawings for just about
    everything I own that was built in the last 30-40 years.


  17. #17
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 19:06:07 -0500, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 23/02/2011 6:47 PM, jmcquown wrote:
    >> Funny thing happened! I discovered a box by my front door this
    >> afternoon. Turns out the element the Sears technician ordered for my
    >> oven was shipped to me directly! How about you email me and talk me
    >> through it? Maybe I can install it myself and save the service fee. And
    >> he wasn't *completely* convinced it needs a new thermostat, just said
    >> maybe and thought it would be better to go ahead and replace it. But, if
    >> I can fix this myself that would be ideal.
    >>

    >
    >
    >It's a piece of cake, and probably the only tool you will need is a
    >Phillips screw driver.
    >
    >
    >Pull the unit out and disconnect the power cord.
    >Open the door, or remove it completely to make it easier to get in
    >there. Just open the door part way and slide it up on the bracket.
    >
    >There are two brackets where the element is mounted into the back wall.
    >|There will be one or two screws in each. Remove them and the element
    >should slide right out.
    >
    >There will be a wire attached to each end of the element. They will be
    >attached either with a slip on connector or with a screw. Remove the old
    >element, attach the new one, screw the bracket into place, put the door
    >on, plug the oven in, push it back into place and sit back and count the
    >money you just saved for five minutes work.



    Instead of pulling the stove out, throw the breaker or remove the
    fuse. I don't believe that there is any need to get to the back of
    stove. Then check by trying to turn on a burner. Or check the oven
    light if it normally works.

    Then take the new element and look at it carefully and make sure it
    looks just like the old one. Maybe set it on top of the old one to
    make sure it fits. Thermostat may be a bit trickier.

    No, I haven't done it myself, but watched as my husband replaced one
    in our stove.

    Don't lose the screws.
    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  18. #18
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    On 24/02/2011 1:37 PM, The Cook wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Pull the unit out and disconnect the power cord.
    >> Open the door, or remove it completely to make it easier to get in
    >> there. Just open the door part way and slide it up on the bracket.
    >>
    >> There are two brackets where the element is mounted into the back wall.
    >> |There will be one or two screws in each. Remove them and the element
    >> should slide right out.
    >>
    >> There will be a wire attached to each end of the element. They will be
    >> attached either with a slip on connector or with a screw. Remove the old
    >> element, attach the new one, screw the bracket into place, put the door
    >> on, plug the oven in, push it back into place and sit back and count the
    >> money you just saved for five minutes work.

    >
    >
    > Instead of pulling the stove out, throw the breaker or remove the
    > fuse. I don't believe that there is any need to get to the back of
    > stove. Then check by trying to turn on a burner. Or check the oven
    > light if it normally works.


    That works. Mine is on a fuse rather than breakers, and my fuse box is
    in the basement, so it is easier for me to just pull the stove out and
    unplug it. Besides, I needed to clean back there anyway because is had
    not been cleaned for a while.
    Someone suggested the possibility of the wiring being done backwards and
    grounding out. I am not an electrician but I don't think think that can
    happen with a 220 circuit because you need the two live feeds to provide
    the 220V.


    > Then take the new element and look at it carefully and make sure it
    > looks just like the old one. Maybe set it on top of the old one to
    > make sure it fits. Thermostat may be a bit trickier.


    They don't have to be exact, so long as the ends line up properly and
    they are the same size and basic shape. When I did mine the other day I
    measured the distance from the bracket to the front end of the element
    and the width from the left side of the element to the right and i drew
    a rough diagram. I went to the hardware store and found one that matched
    and it said that it would fit most Maytag ovens.

    > No, I haven't done it myself, but watched as my husband replaced one
    > in our stove.


    I had my son help, not because I really needed the help but because I
    thought that he should see how easy it is so that he can do it himself
    if he ever has the same problem.


    >
    > Don't lose the screws.


    I really hate to see people pay good money to do something that they can
    easily do themselves. Shortly after I first met my future in laws my
    wife's father was going to call an electrician to change the light bulb
    in a ceiling fixture. I offered to do it. He said he would pay me.
    Nonsense, but he insisted.

    He was a smart guy, but he was an old guy who had lived in houses
    without electricity. He had done well in business and made good money,
    but he knew nothing about electricity. He might have been able to
    handle it it was just a simple lamp with accessible bulb, but this was a
    ceiling fixture and there were those three tricky screws that held the
    globe on.


  19. #19
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Thu, 24 Feb 2011 09:26:03 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >> > I think Boli is the one you need for that.
    >> >
    >> > --

    >> Where the heck is he? He needs to jump in his truck and drive right on
    >> down! I'll buy lunch. Or bake something
    >>

    >
    > There ya go! You can turn it into an rfc mini-cook-in.
    >
    > --

    I'd be more than happy to host a mini cook-in! Just need to get that oven
    fixed first. I'd want to be able to bake a pan of cornbread

    Jill


  20. #20
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Ping: Dave Smith re: oven repair

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    >
    > <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > > On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 22:52:44 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >>
    > >>"Stu" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >>news:[email protected] ..
    > >>> On Wed, 23 Feb 2011 18:47:29 -0500, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > >>> wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>>Funny thing happened! I discovered a box by my front door this
    > >>>>afternoon.
    > >>>>Turns out the element the Sears technician ordered for my oven was
    > >>>>shipped
    > >>>>to me directly! How about you email me and talk me through it? Maybe I
    > >>>>can
    > >>>>install it myself and save the service fee. And he wasn't *completely*
    > >>>>convinced it needs a new thermostat, just said maybe and thought it
    > >>>>would
    > >>>>be
    > >>>>better to go ahead and replace it. But, if I can fix this myself that
    > >>>>would
    > >>>>be ideal.
    > >>>>
    > >>>>Jill
    > >>>
    > >>> If you have a newer stove the element may be the plugin type, otherwise
    > >>> you
    > >>> have to pull the stove out from the wall, pop the back off and
    > >>> disconnect
    > >>> the
    > >>> connections install the new one and rewire it. You should realize the
    > >>> stove is
    > >>> 220V it can kill, makes sure you unplug the stove from the wall first.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>It's not new, the oven came with the house which was built in 1987.
    > >>I figured they'd send it to the repair shop and he'd bring it with him
    > >>when he arrived
    > >>for the appointment on March 8th. If I can install it myself I'll save
    > >>another service charge.
    > >>
    > >>Jill

    > > I would expect the cost of the installation trip is included in the
    > > total bill. If you damage the element or it does not fix the problem,
    > > you will probably be out more $.
    > > --
    > > Mr.E

    >
    >
    > Guess you missed the whole stovetop cooking thread I have a home
    > warranty policy that covers repair/replacement of major appliances. There's
    > a $60 service fee (think "deductible") every time they send out a technician
    > to diagnose/repair something. Since the stove is so old the guy didn't have
    > a heating element for it in his truck. He had to order the part and set up
    > another service call. That will be another $60. And he can't get back here
    > until March 8th. I've already been without an oven for a couple of weeks.
    > (It's weird, you don't really miss having an oven until yours suddenly
    > breaks. Then all of a sudden you want to roast a chicken or bake some
    > biscuits.) If I can save myself another service fee trying to install it
    > myself, why not? How hard can it be? And if I somehow screw it up he can
    > just order another one and I'll just pay another $60 service fee. It will
    > obviously get here before he does. LOL


    It's really a matter of attitude and tools. If the oven element is
    visible in the oven, it should come out with two screws--it's really
    hard to mess up the repair unless you manage to break a wire.




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