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Thread: Pinšage?

  1. #1
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Pinšage?

    of course, i've heard of mirepoix, but not its apparent cousin, pinšage.
    francis lam of *slate* has a discussion here (after a somewhat hokey
    intro):

    <http://www.salon.com/food/francis_lam/2010/05/28/mirepoix_pincage/index.html>

    are folks familiar with this? i mean caramelized onions, sure, but i
    don['t think i've seen the term or idea before.

    your pal,
    blake

  2. #2
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Pinšage?

    blake murphy wrote:

    > are folks familiar with this? i mean caramelized onions, sure, but i
    > don['t think i've seen the term or idea before.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    I never knew it had a name but yes, I've done this on occasion when
    making a particular soup of my fathers. We always caramelized the
    tomato conserva/paste (just a large tablespoon or two) in the pot with
    the veggies (after we sauteed the veggies but) before the addition of
    other ingredients.

  3. #3
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Pinšage?


    "blake murphy" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:tqsf5xbk729c.14iw4hiyi4hze$.[email protected]..
    > of course, i've heard of mirepoix, but not its apparent cousin, pinšage.
    > francis lam of *slate* has a discussion here (after a somewhat hokey
    > intro):
    >
    > <http://www.salon.com/food/francis_lam/2010/05/28/mirepoix_pincage/index.html>
    >
    > are folks familiar with this? i mean caramelized onions, sure, but i
    > don['t think i've seen the term or idea before.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    In the kitchen everything has its name in one language or the other or in
    several. In life there is always someone who will pull it out of the hat
    they found it in to make you feel uninformed.
    There are 8 specific ways to peel and cut potatoes in the classic kitchen
    and each has its name. I had to learn to make them and their names. I
    reckoned it was pretty useless info and set about forgetting them instantly.
    Forget this one, too.



  4. #4
    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. Guest

    Default Re: Pinšage?



    blake murphy wrote:
    > of course, i've heard of mirepoix, but not its apparent cousin, pinšage.
    > francis lam of *slate* has a discussion here (after a somewhat hokey
    > intro):
    >
    > <http://www.salon.com/food/francis_lam/2010/05/28/mirepoix_pincage/index.html>
    >
    > are folks familiar with this? i mean caramelized onions, sure, but i
    > don['t think i've seen the term or idea before.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    Over cooked veggies can have an enhancing effect, especially when
    combined with meat stock, but the result seems to me to be an enhanced
    meat flavor. I prefer the less cooked vegetable stock to which some
    cooked meat may be added before serving. I am not a vegetarian, but i
    do like to cook my meats and veggies separately. Obviously some dishes
    use long cooked veggies to very good effect, but in general, for my
    soups and stew, ragouts, casseroles, risottos & etc. i like a quickly
    cooked veggie stock.

    I have caramelized onions on top of the stove in oil for various dishes,
    and have seen 5 - 10 pounds of onions, thinly sliced, caramelized in hot
    oil in an iron skillet on top of the stove and then put into an oven for
    an hour to further fully caramelize into an mahogany colored mass of
    onion pulp that is then used with other fresh onions in a beef stew type
    dish and French onion soup, although i first ran across the deep
    carmelization in the Belgian carbonad flamanad de boeuf (sp?) recipe.

    Here's an image i keep to remind me why i never made a lot of this
    deeply caramelized onions.

    http://www.artinthepicture.com/artis...ou/onions.jpeg

    Granted the food processor has rendered this once formidable task into
    something less arduous, still, i rarely make enough food to make it
    worth while.

    Even the remarkable flavor that is attained by this method is not
    impressive enough to me, in comparison to freshly chopped raw vegetables
    with which to make a stock, to make this deep carmelazation a standard
    part of my cooking.

    It also seems to me that less cooking time and very low heat is better,
    for vegetable stock making. It seems to me that if a veggie stock is
    cooked too hot it loses a lot of flavor.

    I often roast a bird on a bed of chopped veggies to which i add enough
    water to just cover the mound of diced veggies, replenishing as needed
    during the roasting of the bird.

    The resulting stock can then be drained, defatted and used au jus, as
    is, or reduced and used as a glaze or as the base of a sauce or gravy
    with the additions of any roux, wine, butter etc.
    --

    Mr. Joseph Paul Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.

    Let the games begin!


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