Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Pig meat

  1. #1
    modom (palindrome guy) Guest

    Default Pig meat

    I wanted to get the pastured pork people1 to sell at our market day
    here in Cow Hill. Alas, they probably can't make it next Saturday. But
    I did score two bellies and a whole fresh ham from them this evening.
    Delivery is tomorrow.

    Me? I'm gonna make bacon and cure that ham.

    1Wouldn't Pastured Pork People be a good name for a band? Here's
    Leadbelly on pig meat: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_91CySMAV6s (In
    case you need some inspiration)
    --

    modom

  2. #2
    Ranee at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Pig meat

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Me? I'm gonna make bacon and cure that ham.


    Sounds really good. How do you make yours?

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
    modom (palindrome guy) Guest

    Default Re: Pig meat

    On Tue, 06 Oct 2009 19:56:10 -0700, Ranee at Arabian Knits
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > "modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Me? I'm gonna make bacon and cure that ham.

    >
    > Sounds really good. How do you make yours?
    >

    I follow the recipes in "Charcuterie" by Ruhlman and Polcyn. Bacon is
    not so much of an undertaking -- cure it in the fridge and then smoke
    it.

    Curing a ham is a much longer proposition. The only other time I did
    it, I packed it in salt and weighted it down in the fridge for one day
    for each pound of uncured weight. I used a big enameled pan and a
    smaller Pyrex dish and a 20-lb dumbbell. After that it has to be
    wrapped in cheesecloth and air cured for months.

    I cured it for six months the first time, using a wine collector's
    temperature controlled storage unit I got from Overstock.com. It kept
    the ham at a constant 50-55 degree F temp during the cure. I also
    added a pan of water to the unit every now and then to increase the
    humidity because the condensation tray in the back filled up pretty
    fast at first. You don't want it to dry out too fast and develop a
    crust on the outside that prevents the inner parts from drying. And to
    prevent it from getting yucky, I changed the water out periodically.

    Six months is the lower limit for curing, according to Ruhlman. This
    time, I plan on a longer time in the cooler -- maybe closer to a year.
    We'll see.
    --

    modom

  4. #4
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Pig meat

    On Tue, 06 Oct 2009 20:13:20 -0500, modom (palindrome guy) wrote:

    > I wanted to get the pastured pork people1 to sell at our market day
    > here in Cow Hill. Alas, they probably can't make it next Saturday. But
    > I did score two bellies and a whole fresh ham from them this evening.
    > Delivery is tomorrow.
    >
    > Me? I'm gonna make bacon and cure that ham.
    >
    > 1Wouldn't Pastured Pork People be a good name for a band? Here's
    > Leadbelly on pig meat: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_91CySMAV6s (In
    > case you need some inspiration)


    ry cooder does a nice cover of that on his first album:

    <http://www.amazon.com/Ry-Cooder/dp/B000002KOU/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1254924542&sr=1-3>

    your pal,
    blake

  5. #5
    modom (palindrome guy) Guest

    Default Re: Pig meat

    On Wed, 7 Oct 2009 10:10:14 -0400, blake murphy
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue, 06 Oct 2009 20:13:20 -0500, modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
    >
    >> I wanted to get the pastured pork people1 to sell at our market day
    >> here in Cow Hill. Alas, they probably can't make it next Saturday. But
    >> I did score two bellies and a whole fresh ham from them this evening.
    >> Delivery is tomorrow.
    >>
    >> Me? I'm gonna make bacon and cure that ham.
    >>
    >> 1Wouldn't Pastured Pork People be a good name for a band? Here's
    >> Leadbelly on pig meat: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_91CySMAV6s (In
    >> case you need some inspiration)

    >
    >ry cooder does a nice cover of that on his first album:
    >
    ><http://www.amazon.com/Ry-Cooder/dp/B000002KOU/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1254924542&sr=1-3>
    >

    Yes, D had that album when we first met. Airstream on the cover and
    Leadbelly inside -- I couldn't help but fall for her.
    --

    modom

  6. #6
    Ranee at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Pig meat

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "modom (palindrome guy)" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I follow the recipes in "Charcuterie" by Ruhlman and Polcyn. Bacon is
    > not so much of an undertaking -- cure it in the fridge and then smoke
    > it.


    Cool. I just got that book from the library after hearing about it
    here.

    > Curing a ham is a much longer proposition. The only other time I did
    > it, I packed it in salt and weighted it down in the fridge for one day
    > for each pound of uncured weight. I used a big enameled pan and a
    > smaller Pyrex dish and a 20-lb dumbbell. After that it has to be
    > wrapped in cheesecloth and air cured for months.
    >
    > I cured it for six months the first time, using a wine collector's
    > temperature controlled storage unit I got from Overstock.com. It kept
    > the ham at a constant 50-55 degree F temp during the cure. I also
    > added a pan of water to the unit every now and then to increase the
    > humidity because the condensation tray in the back filled up pretty
    > fast at first. You don't want it to dry out too fast and develop a
    > crust on the outside that prevents the inner parts from drying. And to
    > prevent it from getting yucky, I changed the water out periodically.
    >
    > Six months is the lower limit for curing, according to Ruhlman. This
    > time, I plan on a longer time in the cooler -- maybe closer to a year.
    > We'll see.


    I'm assuming this is for a higher quality product than the packed in
    liquid hams at the grocery store. I just don't imagine that they cure
    them that long and still sell them at the prices they do.

    We have an extra fridge that we are going to set up here for drinks,
    extra produce and the use of the freezer, that seems like the perfect
    place for curing a ham for 6-12 months. Maybe one at 6 months and
    another at 12, just for research.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  7. #7
    modom (palindrome guy) Guest

    Default Re: Pig meat

    On Wed, 07 Oct 2009 08:39:00 -0700, Ranee at Arabian Knits
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm assuming this is for a higher quality product than the packed in
    >liquid hams at the grocery store. I just don't imagine that they cure
    >them that long and still sell them at the prices they do.


    The recipe is for prosciutto.
    >
    > We have an extra fridge that we are going to set up here for drinks,
    >extra produce and the use of the freezer, that seems like the perfect
    >place for curing a ham for 6-12 months. Maybe one at 6 months and
    >another at 12, just for research.
    >

    Check with Ruhlman's book. As I recall, he rcommends hanging the ham
    at ca 55-60F and ca. 60% humidity. But I may be really wrong about
    those numbers. Your fridge might be too chilly and too dry.
    --

    modom

  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Pig meat

    On Wed, 07 Oct 2009 08:39:00 -0700, Ranee at Arabian Knits wrote:

    > I'm assuming this is for a higher quality product than the packed in
    > liquid hams at the grocery store.


    That's a matter of personal preference. I personally don't really
    like the dry cured hams. I'll eat some proscuitto or serrano ham
    now and then, but it's not as versatile as the more common wet-cured
    hams.

    The one advantage to the dry cured hams is that they're made with
    much better pork. You wouldn't want to dry cure a
    supermarket-bought fresh ham.

    -sw

  9. #9
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Pig meat

    On Wed, 07 Oct 2009 10:18:00 -0500, modom (palindrome guy) wrote:

    > On Wed, 7 Oct 2009 10:10:14 -0400, blake murphy
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Tue, 06 Oct 2009 20:13:20 -0500, modom (palindrome guy) wrote:
    >>
    >>> I wanted to get the pastured pork people1 to sell at our market day
    >>> here in Cow Hill. Alas, they probably can't make it next Saturday. But
    >>> I did score two bellies and a whole fresh ham from them this evening.
    >>> Delivery is tomorrow.
    >>>
    >>> Me? I'm gonna make bacon and cure that ham.
    >>>
    >>> 1Wouldn't Pastured Pork People be a good name for a band? Here's
    >>> Leadbelly on pig meat: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_91CySMAV6s (In
    >>> case you need some inspiration)

    >>
    >>ry cooder does a nice cover of that on his first album:
    >>
    >><http://www.amazon.com/Ry-Cooder/dp/B000002KOU/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1254924542&sr=1-3>
    >>

    > Yes, D had that album when we first met. Airstream on the cover and
    > Leadbelly inside -- I couldn't help but fall for her.


    i can understand the attraction.

    your pal,
    blake

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32