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Thread: Pickled Purslane

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Pickled Purslane


    I was lucky enough to get more purslane from the church garden. I
    googled around and found it can be pickled, so that's what I did.
    Now I have to wait at least two weeks to see how it turns out.

    As usual step by step and photos on my blog.
    http://www.kokoscornerblog.com/mycor...-purslane.html

    or
    http://tinyurl.com/3rjcp5z


    @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

    Pickled Purslane

    relishes/preserves

    1 quart purslane leaves and stems; cut into 1-inch pieces
    1 quart apple cider vinegar,
    or old pickle, jalapeno juice
    3 cloves garlic; sliced
    10 peppercorns

    Clean the purslane stems and leaves by rinsing with fresh water. Cut
    into 1" pieces and place in clean jars with lids. Add the spices and
    pour the vinegar over the purslane. Keep this in the refrigerator and
    wait at least two weeks before using. Serve as a side dish with
    omelets and sandwiches.

    http://www.prairielandcsa.org/recipes/purslane.html


    ** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.87 **

    koko
    --
    Food is our common ground, a universal experience
    James Beard

    www.kokoscornerblog.com

    Natural Watkins Spices
    www.apinchofspices.com

  2. #2
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Pickled Purslane

    [email protected] wrote:

    >
    >I was lucky enough to get more purslane from the church garden.


    Are you weeding, or are they growing it on purpose? I've never
    gotten enough to pickle, but it used to be a common enough 'weed' in
    my garden that I'd get a couple meals and a frequent nibble. It
    disappeared for years, but seems to be coming back this year. I
    like the stuff - okra texture with a citrus zing.

    If your church is growing it on purpose I'd love to know where you are
    & what sort of things I can do to make mine feel more at home.<g>

    > I
    >googled around and found it can be pickled, so that's what I did.
    >Now I have to wait at least two weeks to see how it turns out.


    That's the thing about pickles. I put 'em up-- and then I forget I
    have them until 5 years later when I need some empty jars.

    >
    >As usual step by step and photos on my blog.
    >http://www.kokoscornerblog.com/mycor...-purslane.html


    Hmm-- refrigerator pickles. I might find enough for a pint of those
    one day-- Let us know if it was worth the effort.


    >http://www.prairielandcsa.org/recipes/purslane.html


    Good summary on purslane. I had to go see where this CSA was, as I
    wasn't thinking Community Supported Agriculture, but Confederate
    states of America.<g> I think Iowa was on the other side for that
    one.

    thanks-
    Jim

  3. #3
    Ross@home Guest

    Default Re: Pickled Purslane

    On Sun, 14 Aug 2011 19:31:53 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    >
    >I was lucky enough to get more purslane from the church garden. I
    >googled around and found it can be pickled, so that's what I did.
    >Now I have to wait at least two weeks to see how it turns out.
    >

    Purslane is the alternate host to so many nasty pests and diseases
    that we work constantly at trying to keep every last little bit of it
    out of our garden.

    Ross.

  4. #4
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Pickled Purslane

    On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 12:28:06 -0400, Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >[email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>I was lucky enough to get more purslane from the church garden.

    >
    >Are you weeding, or are they growing it on purpose?


    It was being treated as a weed until the hispanic women in our
    congregation told us it its verdolaga. A google of verdolaga took us
    from there.
    Now we aren't throwing away our weeds.

    >I've never gotten enough to pickle, but it used to be a common enough 'weed' in
    >my garden that I'd get a couple meals and a frequent nibble. It
    >disappeared for years, but seems to be coming back this year. I
    >like the stuff - okra texture with a citrus zing.
    >
    >If your church is growing it on purpose I'd love to know where you are
    >& what sort of things I can do to make mine feel more at home.<g>


    I'm in the backcountry of San Diego County CA. at about 3,000 ft.
    We freeze in the winter and swelter in the summer.
    We do get down to freezing temperatures and at least one nice snow
    storm a year. In the summer we can get up to 110* for a short spell.

    The purslane I brought home and didn't eat I just stuck in some
    potting soil and it's doing very well.

    >> I
    >>googled around and found it can be pickled, so that's what I did.
    >>Now I have to wait at least two weeks to see how it turns out.

    >
    >That's the thing about pickles. I put 'em up-- and then I forget I
    >have them until 5 years later when I need some empty jars.
    >
    >>
    >>As usual step by step and photos on my blog.
    >>http://www.kokoscornerblog.com/mycor...-purslane.html

    >
    >Hmm-- refrigerator pickles. I might find enough for a pint of those
    >one day-- Let us know if it was worth the effort.
    >

    I hope it turns out well but nothing ventured, nothing gained and it's
    not like I put a lot of effort into it. ;-)

    >>http://www.prairielandcsa.org/recipes/purslane.html

    >
    >Good summary on purslane. I had to go see where this CSA was, as I
    >wasn't thinking Community Supported Agriculture, but Confederate
    >states of America.<g> I think Iowa was on the other side for that
    >one.
    >
    >thanks-

    You are most welcome.

    >Jim


    koko
    --
    Food is our common ground, a universal experience
    James Beard

    www.kokoscornerblog.com

    Natural Watkins Spices
    www.apinchofspices.com

  5. #5
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Pickled Purslane

    [email protected] wrote:

    >On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 12:28:06 -0400, Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >>[email protected] wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>I was lucky enough to get more purslane from the church garden.

    >>
    >>Are you weeding, or are they growing it on purpose?

    >
    >It was being treated as a weed until the hispanic women in our
    >congregation told us it its verdolaga. A google of verdolaga took us
    >from there.
    >Now we aren't throwing away our weeds.


    cool! I googled it and was led to Johnny's Seeds- so I can buy some
    upright plants for next year-
    http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-5822-go...-purslane.aspx

    -snip-
    >
    >I'm in the backcountry of San Diego County CA. at about 3,000 ft.
    >We freeze in the winter and swelter in the summer.


    I know about 'freezing' in CA-- that might mean 60F.<g> Spent a few
    months in school at MCRD in the spring of 69. All of us NYers were
    loving La Jolla Cove in January. We pretty much had it to ourselves.

    >We do get down to freezing temperatures and at least one nice snow
    >storm a year. In the summer we can get up to 110* for a short spell.


    Well-- OK. Snow makes it legit.<g> And 110 make it unbearable. We
    *almost* hit 100 for the first time in 35 years last month.

    >The purslane I brought home and didn't eat I just stuck in some
    >potting soil and it's doing very well.


    I always treated what I had in the garden as 'volunteer veggies'. I'd
    move it out of the way of the tiller-- and always leave some to seed.
    But it died out for a lot of years. This is the first year I've
    gotten any on a long time. I don't know what I did different.

    I'll have a row of it next year.

    Jim

  6. #6
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Pickled Purslane

    On Tue, 16 Aug 2011 08:20:39 -0400, Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >[email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>On Mon, 15 Aug 2011 12:28:06 -0400, Jim Elbrecht <[email protected]>
    >>wrote:
    >>
    >>>[email protected] wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>I was lucky enough to get more purslane from the church garden.
    >>>
    >>>Are you weeding, or are they growing it on purpose?

    >>
    >>It was being treated as a weed until the hispanic women in our
    >>congregation told us it its verdolaga. A google of verdolaga took us
    >>from there.
    >>Now we aren't throwing away our weeds.

    >
    >cool! I googled it and was led to Johnny's Seeds- so I can buy some
    >upright plants for next year-
    >http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-5822-go...-purslane.aspx


    Dang, you can get a lot of seeds. They are so small they look like
    freshly ground black pepper.
    >
    >-snip-
    >>
    >>I'm in the backcountry of San Diego County CA. at about 3,000 ft.
    >>We freeze in the winter and swelter in the summer.

    >
    >I know about 'freezing' in CA-- that might mean 60F.<g> Spent a few
    >months in school at MCRD in the spring of 69. All of us NYers were
    >loving La Jolla Cove in January. We pretty much had it to ourselves.


    Winter is my favorite time of the year for the beach.
    >
    >>We do get down to freezing temperatures and at least one nice snow
    >>storm a year. In the summer we can get up to 110* for a short spell.

    >
    >Well-- OK. Snow makes it legit.<g> And 110 make it unbearable. We
    >*almost* hit 100 for the first time in 35 years last month.
    >
    >>The purslane I brought home and didn't eat I just stuck in some
    >>potting soil and it's doing very well.

    >
    >I always treated what I had in the garden as 'volunteer veggies'. I'd
    >move it out of the way of the tiller-- and always leave some to seed.
    >But it died out for a lot of years. This is the first year I've
    >gotten any on a long time. I don't know what I did different.
    >
    >I'll have a row of it next year.
    >
    >Jim


    I hope we are both successful with our purslane pursuits. I'll keep a
    photo record so we can compare notes next year.

    koko
    --
    Food is our common ground, a universal experience
    James Beard

    www.kokoscornerblog.com

    Natural Watkins Spices
    www.apinchofspices.com

  7. #7
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Pickled Purslane

    koko wrote:

    > I was lucky enough to get more purslane from the church garden. I googled
    > around and found it can be pickled, so that's what I did. Now I have to
    > wait at least two weeks to see how it turns out.


    Do you have any specific plans for it?

    Bob



  8. #8
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Pickled Purslane

    On Wed, 17 Aug 2011 18:47:46 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >koko wrote:
    >
    >> I was lucky enough to get more purslane from the church garden. I googled
    >> around and found it can be pickled, so that's what I did. Now I have to
    >> wait at least two weeks to see how it turns out.

    >
    >Do you have any specific plans for it?
    >
    >Bob
    >

    Like I said, as a side dish for sandwiches or omelets.
    I've been thinking it would probably be a nice garnish on top of
    deviled eggs.

    koko
    --
    Food is our common ground, a universal experience
    James Beard

    www.kokoscornerblog.com

    Natural Watkins Spices
    www.apinchofspices.com

  9. #9
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Pickled Purslane

    koko wrote:

    >>> I was lucky enough to get more purslane from the church garden. I
    >>> googled around and found it can be pickled, so that's what I did. Now I
    >>> have to wait at least two weeks to see how it turns out.

    >>
    >> Do you have any specific plans for it?
    >>
    >>

    > Like I said, as a side dish for sandwiches or omelets.
    > I've been thinking it would probably be a nice garnish on top of
    > deviled eggs.


    It seemed to me that it might be good with barbecue or in potato salad. Or
    maybe as a garnish for a gumbo. I hope it turns out well!

    Bob




  10. #10
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Pickled Purslane

    On Wed, 17 Aug 2011 19:59:40 -0700, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >koko wrote:
    >
    >>>> I was lucky enough to get more purslane from the church garden. I
    >>>> googled around and found it can be pickled, so that's what I did. Now I
    >>>> have to wait at least two weeks to see how it turns out.
    >>>
    >>> Do you have any specific plans for it?
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Like I said, as a side dish for sandwiches or omelets.
    >> I've been thinking it would probably be a nice garnish on top of
    >> deviled eggs.

    >
    >It seemed to me that it might be good with barbecue or in potato salad. Or
    >maybe as a garnish for a gumbo. I hope it turns out well!


    Sorry, but. .
    "Koko's pickled purslane gumbo garnish" is just to alliterative to
    pass up.

    And it sounds tastey, too.

    Jim

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