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Thread: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

  1. #1
    I'm back on the laptop Guest

    Default PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    (Char Siu) Pork spare ribs, on sauteed garlic butter potatos, and lightly
    steamed carrot sticks and other veges.

    http://tinypic.com/m/farb6a/3



    --
    Peter
    Tasmania
    Australia

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 06:57:25 GMT, "I'm back on the laptop"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > (Char Siu) Pork spare ribs, on sauteed garlic butter potatos, and lightly
    > steamed carrot sticks and other veges.
    >
    > http://tinypic.com/m/farb6a/3


    Chinese style char su? Would you please post the marinade recipe?

    --

    Tell congress not to censor the web. Add your voice here.
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  3. #3
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    sf wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 06:57:25 GMT, "I'm back on the laptop"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > (Char Siu) Pork spare ribs, on sauteed garlic butter potatos, and
    > > lightly steamed carrot sticks and other veges.
    > >
    > > http://tinypic.com/m/farb6a/3

    >
    > Chinese style char su? Would you please post the marinade recipe?


    Could be. I make one like it with a jarred thick pre-made sauce but
    this may be a simpler treatment that often goes under the same name but
    isn't classic 'Char Su'.

    Proportions approximate and adjust for your own tastes:

    3 parts jufran hot bannana sauce
    1 part quality soy sauce (Datu Puti suggested, never kikkoman)
    1/2 part calamansi juice (may substitute lime at need)

    Optional additions:
    - A few cloves well crushed garlic or turn to paste in a blender with
    above
    - 1/2 part raw sugar (not needed IMHO but traditional is sweeter)
    - 1 star anise, crushed to powder (this makes it very char sui tasting
    and was the missing element)
    - Splash of vinegar, cane sugar type from Datu Puti works well

    Western tastes may prefer to start with 1/4 part calamansi then taste
    test on the way up to preferred level.

    Marinade time depends on how 'soft' the meat is. Bone in pork ribs,
    about 2 hours suits me. Beef round steak, 3-4 hours makes it tender
    (do not overcook!) and 5-6 can turn it to a flavorful but 'mushy
    texture'.

    Getting calamansi in the USA can be a trial in many areas other then
    powdered which doesnt have the same effect. Lime juice will add the
    flavor close enough but you'll need the splash of vinegar as it doesnt
    have the same softening effect level as true calamansi. Peter though,
    probably finds calamansi easier to locate than limes (grin). He may
    know them as 'asian lime'. The flavor is a very citrusy sort that is
    similar to lemon/lime.

    In this recipe, using pure lime for calamansi works but if you make
    some other asian recipe that calls for it with a lighter flavor base, a
    closer match would be 2/3 lime 1/2 lemon. (Peter, check me there? Too
    much lemon maybe?). An example where you'd have to have the lemon in
    there is a Filipeno dish of deep fried very lightly battered (just
    enough for a little sauce to stick) whole baby crabs ranging from
    quarter to 50cent piece in size. These are served in a center pile
    with a dish of 'mother vinegar' and calamansi juice (or squeeze your
    own) which you add to the vinegar 'to taste'. Dip and eat.



    --


  4. #4
    I'm back on the laptop Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in news:ga-
    [email protected]:


    > 1 part quality soy sauce (Datu Puti suggested, never kikkoman)



    Why never Kikkoman?


    --
    Peter
    Tasmania
    Australia

  5. #5
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 06:57:25 GMT, "I'm back on the laptop"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >(Char Siu) Pork spare ribs, on sauteed garlic butter potatos, and lightly
    >steamed carrot sticks and other veges.
    >
    >http://tinypic.com/m/farb6a/3


    thank you for the picture. looks wonderful
    janet us

  6. #6
    I'm back on the laptop Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    sf <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 06:57:25 GMT, "I'm back on the laptop"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> (Char Siu) Pork spare ribs, on sauteed garlic butter potatos, and
    >> lightly steamed carrot sticks and other veges.
    >>
    >> http://tinypic.com/m/farb6a/3

    >
    > Chinese style char su? Would you please post the marinade recipe?
    >



    It's basically a honey/soy/sugar/hoisin/shaoxing sauce. I always throw
    some garlic cloves in, as well as plenty of cracked pepper. You can add
    some oyster sauce, sweet chilli sauce... basically whatever floats your
    boat and makes it taste good.... I've done a couple with the sweet
    chilli added, and it's a nice touch.... I just leave out the cracked
    pepper :-)

    I started with a hard and fast recipe a long time ago, and just
    'graduated' to my own mix..... which is never the same anyways!!
    (Sometimes I like it red, sometimes I like it dark!!)


    Had a look for a recipe and found this one.............


    http://www.whats4eats.com/meats/char-siu-recipe




    --
    Peter
    Tasmania
    Australia

  7. #7
    I'm back on the laptop Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 06:57:25 GMT, "I'm back on the laptop"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>(Char Siu) Pork spare ribs, on sauteed garlic butter potatos, and
    >>lightly steamed carrot sticks and other veges.
    >>
    >>http://tinypic.com/m/farb6a/3

    >
    > thank you for the picture. looks wonderful
    > janet us
    >



    Thanks Janet.

    I'm studiously watching the steamed veges of late, so that they have that
    warmed right through thing, but still have the 'crunch'.
    It's a fine line to tread :-)

    --
    Peter
    Tasmania
    Australia

  8. #8
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    I'm back on the laptop wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in news:ga-
    > [email protected]:
    >
    >
    > > 1 part quality soy sauce (Datu Puti suggested, never kikkoman)

    >
    >
    > Why never Kikkoman?


    Cheap stuff with less flavor. Costs more than the actual good stuff.
    Kikkoman is a chemical brew and you can tell. They make alot of money
    selling it overseas.

    --


  9. #9
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 12:28:11 -0600, "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm back on the laptop wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >> "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in news:ga-
    >> [email protected]:
    >>
    >>
    >> > 1 part quality soy sauce (Datu Puti suggested, never kikkoman)

    >>
    >>
    >> Why never Kikkoman?

    >
    >Cheap stuff with less flavor. Costs more than the actual good stuff.
    >Kikkoman is a chemical brew and you can tell.


    That's not true. All soy sauces are over priced, you're paying mostly
    for the bottle... but at least Kikkoman is a very consistant
    product... all the other's I've tried vary greatly with every bottle.
    And "chemical brew" is meaningless gobbledygook, all brews are
    chemical. Your reasons for poopooing Kikkoman are all obviously
    steeped in blind prejudice. One can no more say which soy sauce is
    best than which coffee, beer, or tea is best... best to who...
    everyones taste is unique. Sampled straight by the spoonful I like
    Kikkoman original best. Believe it or not I like American cheese
    drizzled with Kikkoman soy sauce.

  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 08:51:42 -0600, "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    > > On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 06:57:25 GMT, "I'm back on the laptop"
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > (Char Siu) Pork spare ribs, on sauteed garlic butter potatos, and
    > > > lightly steamed carrot sticks and other veges.
    > > >
    > > > http://tinypic.com/m/farb6a/3

    > >
    > > Chinese style char su? Would you please post the marinade recipe?

    >
    > Could be. I make one like it with a jarred thick pre-made sauce but
    > this may be a simpler treatment that often goes under the same name but
    > isn't classic 'Char Su'.
    >
    > Proportions approximate and adjust for your own tastes:
    >
    > 3 parts jufran hot bannana sauce
    > 1 part quality soy sauce (Datu Puti suggested, never kikkoman)


    -vvv-
    > 1/2 part calamansi juice (may substitute lime at need)


    Thanks, because I wouldn't know where to find it here and I do go to
    Asian markets.

    A neighbor who was from Macao used to make char su - I know she
    started off with American style ketchup (but I'm not sure what else
    she did) and it tasted just like what we'd get in a restaurant. I
    wanted to ask her for the recipe, but they were older and her husband
    had a stroke shortly after so there were other priorities.
    >
    > Optional additions:
    > - A few cloves well crushed garlic or turn to paste in a blender with
    > above
    > - 1/2 part raw sugar (not needed IMHO but traditional is sweeter)
    > - 1 star anise, crushed to powder (this makes it very char sui tasting
    > and was the missing element)
    > - Splash of vinegar, cane sugar type from Datu Puti works well
    >
    > Western tastes may prefer to start with 1/4 part calamansi then taste
    > test on the way up to preferred level.
    >
    > Marinade time depends on how 'soft' the meat is. Bone in pork ribs,
    > about 2 hours suits me. Beef round steak, 3-4 hours makes it tender
    > (do not overcook!) and 5-6 can turn it to a flavorful but 'mushy
    > texture'.
    >
    > Getting calamansi in the USA can be a trial in many areas other then
    > powdered which doesnt have the same effect.


    Thanks for the warning.

    > Lime juice will add the
    > flavor close enough but you'll need the splash of vinegar as it doesnt
    > have the same softening effect level as true calamansi.


    Okay.

    > Peter though,
    > probably finds calamansi easier to locate than limes (grin). He may
    > know them as 'asian lime'. The flavor is a very citrusy sort that is
    > similar to lemon/lime.


    I guess it's another one of those things like Kaffir that hasn't found
    a following yet. I wonder how it would work in a Margarita?
    >
    > In this recipe, using pure lime for calamansi works but if you make
    > some other asian recipe that calls for it with a lighter flavor base, a
    > closer match would be 2/3 lime 1/2 lemon. (Peter, check me there? Too
    > much lemon maybe?). An example where you'd have to have the lemon in
    > there is a Filipeno dish of deep fried very lightly battered (just
    > enough for a little sauce to stick) whole baby crabs ranging from
    > quarter to 50cent piece in size. These are served in a center pile
    > with a dish of 'mother vinegar' and calamansi juice (or squeeze your
    > own) which you add to the vinegar 'to taste'. Dip and eat.



    --

    Tell congress not to censor the web. Add your voice here.
    https://www.google.com/landing/takeaction/

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 15:40:54 +0000 (UTC), "I'm back on the laptop"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 06:57:25 GMT, "I'm back on the laptop"
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> (Char Siu) Pork spare ribs, on sauteed garlic butter potatos, and
    > >> lightly steamed carrot sticks and other veges.
    > >>
    > >> http://tinypic.com/m/farb6a/3

    > >
    > > Chinese style char su? Would you please post the marinade recipe?
    > >

    >
    >
    > It's basically a honey/soy/sugar/hoisin/shaoxing sauce. I always throw
    > some garlic cloves in, as well as plenty of cracked pepper. You can add
    > some oyster sauce, sweet chilli sauce... basically whatever floats your
    > boat and makes it taste good.... I've done a couple with the sweet
    > chilli added, and it's a nice touch.... I just leave out the cracked
    > pepper :-)


    Thanks, I have everything except the shaoxing. Can I leave it out or
    is it essential?
    >
    > I started with a hard and fast recipe a long time ago, and just
    > 'graduated' to my own mix..... which is never the same anyways!!
    > (Sometimes I like it red, sometimes I like it dark!!)
    >
    >
    > Had a look for a recipe and found this one.............
    >
    >
    > http://www.whats4eats.com/meats/char-siu-recipe


    I have dry sherry, so can do. Thanks!

    --

    Tell congress not to censor the web. Add your voice here.
    https://www.google.com/landing/takeaction/

  12. #12
    ItsJoanNotJoann Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    On Jan 29, 9:32*am, Janet Bostwick <nos...@cableone.net> wrote:
    >
    > On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 06:57:25 GMT, "I'm back on the laptop"
    >
    > <Imb...@home.in.Brisbane> wrote:
    >
    > >(Char Siu) Pork spare ribs, on sauteed garlic butter potatos, and lightly
    > >steamed carrot sticks and other veges.

    >
    > >http://tinypic.com/m/farb6a/3

    >
    > thank you for the picture. *looks wonderful
    >
    >

    I agree!


  13. #13
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    Brooklyn1 wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 12:28:11 -0600, "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I'm back on the laptop wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    > >
    > >> "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in news:ga-
    > >> [email protected]:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> > 1 part quality soy sauce (Datu Puti suggested, never kikkoman)
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Why never Kikkoman?

    > >
    > > Cheap stuff with less flavor. Costs more than the actual good
    > > stuff. Kikkoman is a chemical brew and you can tell.

    >
    > That's not true. All soy sauces are over priced, you're paying mostly
    > for the bottle... but at least Kikkoman is a very consistant
    > product... all the other's I've tried vary greatly with every bottle.
    > And "chemical brew" is meaningless gobbledygook, all brews are
    > chemical. Your reasons for poopooing Kikkoman are all obviously
    > steeped in blind prejudice. One can no more say which soy sauce is
    > best than which coffee, beer, or tea is best... best to who...
    > everyones taste is unique. Sampled straight by the spoonful I like
    > Kikkoman original best. Believe it or not I like American cheese
    > drizzled with Kikkoman soy sauce.


    You havent a clue on this one. Kikkoman is crap and in Japan, if you
    ue it you hide the bottle so your guests do not see it. It's used only
    in cooking, not at serving at the table.

    A real soy is a time aged item, taking up to a year to develop the
    depth of a true one.


    --


  14. #14
    projectile vomit chick Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    On Jan 29, 1:35*pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    > Believe it or not I like American cheese drizzled with Kikkoman soy sauce..


    Damn! I'm gonna try that!

  15. #15
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    On Jan 29, 8:42*pm, projectile vomit chick
    <projektilevomitch...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > On Jan 29, 1:35*pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    > > Believe it or not I like American cheese drizzled with Kikkoman soy sauce.

    >
    > Damn! *I'm gonna try that!


    Brown salt water drizzled on salty flavorless fat. Oh joy! :-(\

    John Kuthe...

  16. #16
    I'm back on the laptop Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    ItsJoanNotJoann <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Jan 29, 9:32*am, Janet Bostwick <nos...@cableone.net> wrote:
    >>
    >> On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 06:57:25 GMT, "I'm back on the laptop"
    >>
    >> <Imb...@home.in.Brisbane> wrote:
    >>
    >> >(Char Siu) Pork spare ribs, on sauteed garlic butter potatos, and
    >> >lightl

    > y
    >> >steamed carrot sticks and other veges.

    >>
    >> >http://tinypic.com/m/farb6a/3

    >>
    >> thank you for the picture. *looks wonderful
    >>
    >>

    > I agree!
    >
    >



    Thanxs :-)

    --
    Peter
    Tasmania
    Australia

  17. #17
    I'm back on the laptop Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news[email protected]:

    > I'm back on the laptop wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >> "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in news:ga-
    >> [email protected]:
    >>
    >>
    >> > 1 part quality soy sauce (Datu Puti suggested, never kikkoman)

    >>
    >>
    >> Why never Kikkoman?

    >
    > Cheap stuff with less flavor. Costs more than the actual good stuff.
    > Kikkoman is a chemical brew and you can tell. They make alot of money
    > selling it overseas.
    >



    OK, spanks for that, I'll have to go visit a continental deli and look for
    some Datu Pita.


    --
    Peter
    Tasmania
    Australia

  18. #18
    I'm back on the laptop Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    sf <[email protected]> wrote in news:d9bbi75u60eu4c45p4cp1jlvpusm291kup@
    4ax.com:

    > On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 15:40:54 +0000 (UTC), "I'm back on the laptop"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> sf <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> news:l[email protected]:
    >>
    >> > On Sun, 29 Jan 2012 06:57:25 GMT, "I'm back on the laptop"
    >> > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> (Char Siu) Pork spare ribs, on sauteed garlic butter potatos, and
    >> >> lightly steamed carrot sticks and other veges.
    >> >>
    >> >> http://tinypic.com/m/farb6a/3
    >> >
    >> > Chinese style char su? Would you please post the marinade recipe?
    >> >

    >>
    >>
    >> It's basically a honey/soy/sugar/hoisin/shaoxing sauce. I always

    throw
    >> some garlic cloves in, as well as plenty of cracked pepper. You can

    add
    >> some oyster sauce, sweet chilli sauce... basically whatever floats

    your
    >> boat and makes it taste good.... I've done a couple with the sweet
    >> chilli added, and it's a nice touch.... I just leave out the cracked
    >> pepper :-)

    >
    > Thanks, I have everything except the shaoxing. Can I leave it out or
    > is it essential?
    >>
    >> I started with a hard and fast recipe a long time ago, and just
    >> 'graduated' to my own mix..... which is never the same anyways!!
    >> (Sometimes I like it red, sometimes I like it dark!!)
    >>
    >>
    >> Had a look for a recipe and found this one.............
    >>
    >>
    >> http://www.whats4eats.com/meats/char-siu-recipe

    >
    > I have dry sherry, so can do. Thanks!
    >




    Mmmmmmmmmm, dry sherry!!

    I used to use dry sherry all the time in my chinese cooking, but after
    some funny looks from sales assistants and always feeling like having to
    explain that I'm going to use it for *cooking* ...... I switched to
    shaoxing, which I can buy in any deli :-)

    --
    Peter
    Tasmania
    Australia

  19. #19
    I'm back on the laptop Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    John Kuthe <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Jan 29, 8:42*pm, projectile vomit chick
    > <projektilevomitch...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> On Jan 29, 1:35*pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >>
    >> > Believe it or not I like American cheese drizzled with Kikkoman soy
    >> > sau

    > ce.
    >>
    >> Damn! *I'm gonna try that!

    >
    > Brown salt water drizzled on salty flavorless fat. Oh joy! :-(\
    >
    > John Kuthe...
    >



    Suddenly, my hunger pangs disappeared!! :-)

    --
    Peter
    Tasmania
    Australia

  20. #20
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: PIC: Meat and 3 veg

    On Mon, 30 Jan 2012 03:48:24 GMT, "I'm back on the laptop"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >"cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in
    >news[email protected]:
    >
    >> I'm back on the laptop wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>
    >>> "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in news:ga-
    >>> [email protected]:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> > 1 part quality soy sauce (Datu Puti suggested, never kikkoman)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Why never Kikkoman?

    >>
    >> Cheap stuff with less flavor. Costs more than the actual good stuff.
    >> Kikkoman is a chemical brew and you can tell. They make alot of money
    >> selling it overseas.

    >
    >OK, spanks for that.


    Are you actually going to give credibility to someone who thinks
    "alot" is a word. Especially after saying the orientals make fun of
    it but thinks Kikkoman makes a lot of money selling something the
    orientals would lose face buying. Fact is Kikkoman has a huge modern
    plant Japan. If it was such an awful product it wouldn't be
    manufactured in the orient. I've tried many soy sauces over the years
    that I picked up at oriental markets, usually all printed in oriental
    symbols thinking they were authentic and the real deal... each and
    every one was terrible, tasted either like watered down saline
    solution or like extra salty pishwassser. I happen to like soy sauce
    and use more than the average round eye. I think Kikkoman is better
    than malt vinegar or Heinz on french fries but equal parts of all
    three is da bomb.
    http://kikkoman.com/qualityandsafety...on/index.shtml
    I also make a Kickass Kikkoman potato salad.

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