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Thread: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

  1. #1
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    One of our favorite things to do here is make Philly cheesesteak
    sandwiches - we don't do it often enough.

    While you can buy "chip" steak frozen at the grocery store, which seems
    to be a pretty close duplicate of what you get in the authentic thing in
    Philly, we have found an alternative we far prefer: buy roast beef from
    the deli counter, which is almost always cooked very rare, and ask for
    it to be sliced very thin.

    Fry the rare roast beef in the oil of your choice to get rid of most or
    all of the pink in it. (There is no such thing as a rare Philly
    cheesesteak, but you can keep your roast beef rare if you wish, but it
    needs to be grilled or fried for sure, IMHO.) Here, as we take the
    beef out of the frying pan, we put a little sea salt and fresh black
    pepper on it.

    Buy yourself some soft, long rolls, add the cheese of your choice and
    whatever else you like, and you're good to go. Here we do it this way:

    Open the long rolls, add extra sharp cheddar, sprinkle a bit of garlic
    powder and fresh ground black pepper, put in the toaster oven or broiler
    until golden brown.

    Put the meat on the cheesed rolls and you can be done, or you can add
    carmelized onions, peppers, or whatever other fried or fresh veggie you
    like, add ketchup or tomatoe sauce.

    Fairway's had their house roast beef on sale for $6.99 per pound, which
    was the inspiration for this.

    -S-



  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 14:24:36 -0500, "Steve Freides" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > One of our favorite things to do here is make Philly cheesesteak
    > sandwiches - we don't do it often enough.
    >
    > While you can buy "chip" steak frozen at the grocery store, which seems
    > to be a pretty close duplicate of what you get in the authentic thing in
    > Philly, we have found an alternative we far prefer: buy roast beef from
    > the deli counter, which is almost always cooked very rare, and ask for
    > it to be sliced very thin.
    >
    > Fry the rare roast beef in the oil of your choice to get rid of most or
    > all of the pink in it. (There is no such thing as a rare Philly
    > cheesesteak, but you can keep your roast beef rare if you wish, but it
    > needs to be grilled or fried for sure, IMHO.) Here, as we take the
    > beef out of the frying pan, we put a little sea salt and fresh black
    > pepper on it.
    >
    > Buy yourself some soft, long rolls, add the cheese of your choice and
    > whatever else you like, and you're good to go. Here we do it this way:
    >
    > Open the long rolls, add extra sharp cheddar, sprinkle a bit of garlic
    > powder and fresh ground black pepper, put in the toaster oven or broiler
    > until golden brown.
    >
    > Put the meat on the cheesed rolls and you can be done, or you can add
    > carmelized onions, peppers, or whatever other fried or fresh veggie you
    > like, add ketchup or tomatoe sauce.
    >
    > Fairway's had their house roast beef on sale for $6.99 per pound, which
    > was the inspiration for this.
    >

    I use deli sliced roast beef, which is salty enough for me, steak
    rolls and provolone cheese. Other than that, what I do is almost
    exactly what you do (minus the peppers - just onion for us). Never
    thought about using garlic, which I love. Do they put garlic on
    cheese steaks in Philly?

    --

    Carrot cake counts as a serving of vegetables.

  3. #3
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    Steve,

    If it isn't made in Philly, it's just called a cheesesteak.

    Since it's not going into my stomach, I'll leave it at that.

    Best,

    Andy

  4. #4
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    On Jan 12, 12:17*pm, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    > Steve,
    >
    > If it isn't made in Philly, it's just called a cheesesteak.
    >
    > Since it's not going into my stomach, I'll leave it at that.
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Andy


    We'd prefer that you just leave.

  5. #5
    none of your business Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    On Jan 12, 2:24*pm, "Steve Freides" <st...@kbnj.com> wrote:
    > One of our favorite things to do here is make Philly cheesesteak
    > sandwiches - we don't do it often enough.
    >
    > While you can buy "chip" steak frozen at the grocery store, which seems
    > to be a pretty close duplicate of what you get in the authentic thing in
    > Philly, we have found an alternative we far prefer: buy roast beef from
    > the deli counter, which is almost always cooked very rare, and ask for
    > it to be sliced very thin.
    >
    > Fry the rare roast beef in the oil of your choice to get rid of most or
    > all of the pink in it. *(There is no such thing as a rare Philly
    > cheesesteak, but you can keep your roast beef rare if you wish, but it
    > needs to be grilled or fried for sure, IMHO.) * Here, as we take the
    > beef out of the frying pan, we put a little sea salt and fresh black
    > pepper on it.
    >
    > Buy yourself some soft, long rolls, add the cheese of your choice and
    > whatever else you like, and you're good to go. *Here we do it this way:
    >
    > Open the long rolls, add extra sharp cheddar, sprinkle a bit of garlic
    > powder and fresh ground black pepper, put in the toaster oven or broiler
    > until golden brown.
    >
    > Put the meat on the cheesed rolls and you can be done, or you can add
    > carmelized onions, peppers, or whatever other fried or fresh veggie you
    > like, add ketchup or tomatoe sauce.
    >
    > Fairway's had their house roast beef on sale for $6.99 per pound, which
    > was the inspiration for this.
    >
    > -S-


    that's a hot roast beef and cheese sandwich. I'm sure it's tasty, but
    it's not a cheesesteak unless prepared with steak.

  6. #6
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > we have found an alternative we far prefer: buy roast beef from
    > the deli counter, which is almost always cooked very rare, and ask for
    > it to be sliced very thin.
    >
    > Fry the rare roast beef in the oil of your choice to get rid of most or
    > all of the pink in it. (There is no such thing as a rare Philly
    > cheesesteak, but you can keep your roast beef rare if you wish, but it
    > needs to be grilled or fried for sure, IMHO.) Here, as we take the
    > beef out of the frying pan, we put a little sea salt and fresh black
    > pepper on it.


    We do something similar for french dip sandwiches. We either just let
    the meat come up to room temperature, or if we are in a hurry, briefly
    put it in the dipping liquid to warm it. We broil the plain buns in the
    oven.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  7. #7
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 14:17:43 -0600, Andy wrote:

    > Steve,
    >
    > If it isn't made in Philly, it's just called a cheesesteak.


    And if they're from Brussels, then they're just sprouts.

    -sw

  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 14:23:28 -0800 (PST), none of your business wrote:

    > that's a hot roast beef and cheese sandwich. I'm sure it's tasty, but
    > it's not a cheesesteak unless prepared with steak.


    So you actually have to cut a "steak" off of that top sirloin roast
    and then shave it rather than shaving off pieces of the whole top
    sirloin?

    Get real.

    -sw

  9. #9
    dejablues Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef


    "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > One of our favorite things to do here is make Philly cheesesteak
    > sandwiches - we don't do it often enough.
    >
    > While you can buy "chip" steak frozen at the grocery store, which seems to
    > be a pretty close duplicate of what you get in the authentic thing in
    > Philly, we have found an alternative we far prefer: buy roast beef from
    > the deli counter, which is almost always cooked very rare, and ask for it
    > to be sliced very thin.
    >
    > Fry the rare roast beef in the oil of your choice to get rid of most or
    > all of the pink in it. (There is no such thing as a rare Philly
    > cheesesteak, but you can keep your roast beef rare if you wish, but it
    > needs to be grilled or fried for sure, IMHO.) Here, as we take the beef
    > out of the frying pan, we put a little sea salt and fresh black pepper on
    > it.
    >
    > Buy yourself some soft, long rolls, add the cheese of your choice and
    > whatever else you like, and you're good to go. Here we do it this way:
    >
    > Open the long rolls, add extra sharp cheddar, sprinkle a bit of garlic
    > powder and fresh ground black pepper, put in the toaster oven or broiler
    > until golden brown.
    >
    > Put the meat on the cheesed rolls and you can be done, or you can add
    > carmelized onions, peppers, or whatever other fried or fresh veggie you
    > like, add ketchup or tomatoe sauce.
    >
    > Fairway's had their house roast beef on sale for $6.99 per pound, which
    > was the inspiration for this.
    >
    > -S-
    >Sounds fairly tasty, but don't ever call it a Philly cheesesteak. Even if

    you prefer it, it's faux.
    Philly steaks are made from fresh meat, ribeye is the best. Frozen chip
    steak tastes a lot more like a cheesesteak. Deli roast beef ? Not a Philly
    cheesesteak. Not even close.
    The cheese, which can be American or Provolone, or even CheezWhiz ( never
    Cheddar) is melted onto the steak in the pan , never put on the roll alone.
    As for the rolls, they have to be hard rolls. Long rolls with a hard crust,
    which is what you get from Italian bakeries in Philadelphia which use hard
    water to make their dough. Not soft rolls.
    You have to have that hard bite of roll, fresh hot steak, and conglomerated
    cheese. Onions, if added , are not cooked long enough to caramelize, but
    merely until soft.
    Frying deli roast beef is just ....wrong.



  10. #10
    none of your business Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    On Jan 12, 6:58*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 14:23:28 -0800 (PST), none of your business wrote:
    >
    > > that's a hot roast beef and cheese sandwich. I'm sure it's tasty, but
    > > it's not a cheesesteak unless prepared with steak.

    >
    > So you actually have to cut a "steak" off of that top sirloin roast
    > and then shave it rather than shaving off pieces of the whole top
    > sirloin?
    >
    > Get real.
    >
    > -sw


    you get real. the idea is you grill thinly sliced raw beef to desired
    doneness, then melt the cheese on top of it. Add onions if desired. If
    the meat is precooked, it's not a cheesesteak sandwich. It's roast
    beef with melted cheese. Tasty. But don't call it a cheesesteak.

  11. #11
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    ?
    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 14:23:28 -0800 (PST), none of your business wrote:
    >
    >> that's a hot roast beef and cheese sandwich. I'm sure it's tasty, but
    >> it's not a cheesesteak unless prepared with steak.

    >
    > So you actually have to cut a "steak" off of that top sirloin roast
    > and then shave it rather than shaving off pieces of the whole top
    > sirloin?
    >
    > Get real.
    >
    > -sw


    No, it does not have to be steak, but is should not be processed luncheon
    meat either.


    INGREDIENTS: Beef, Water, Contains Less Than 1% Of Salt, Sodium Phosphate,
    Dextrose, Maltodextrin, Dried Beef Stock, Caramel Color, Soluble Black
    Pepper, Garlic Powder, Onion Powder, Grill Flavor (From Vegetable Oil) ,
    Corn Syrup Solids, Modified Corn Starch, Lemon Juice, Spice Extractives,
    Lemon Oil. Coated With Salt, Dextrose, Garlic & Onion Powder, Dried Beef
    Stock, Natural


  12. #12
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 23:13:22 -0500, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

    > ?
    > "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 14:23:28 -0800 (PST), none of your business wrote:
    >>
    >>> that's a hot roast beef and cheese sandwich. I'm sure it's tasty, but
    >>> it's not a cheesesteak unless prepared with steak.

    >>
    >> So you actually have to cut a "steak" off of that top sirloin roast
    >> and then shave it rather than shaving off pieces of the whole top
    >> sirloin?
    >>
    >> Get real.

    >
    > No, it does not have to be steak, but is should not be processed luncheon
    > meat either.


    I made no mention of processed lunch meat. I was pointing out the
    ridiculous restriction of using a sirloin "steak" over using a sirloin
    roast.

    Sirloin steak is on sale for $1.97 this week. So I'll be making a
    whole roast beef out of a whole sirloin. I would still argue that I
    could use the result, which I cook med-rare, to make Philly cheese
    steaks.

    -sw

  13. #13
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 18:49:00 -0800 (PST), none of your business wrote:

    > On Jan 12, 6:58*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >> On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 14:23:28 -0800 (PST), none of your business wrote:
    >>
    >>> that's a hot roast beef and cheese sandwich. I'm sure it's tasty, but
    >>> it's not a cheesesteak unless prepared with steak.

    >>
    >> So you actually have to cut a "steak" off of that top sirloin roast
    >> and then shave it rather than shaving off pieces of the whole top
    >> sirloin?
    >>
    >> Get real.
    >>
    >> -sw

    >
    > you get real. the idea is you grill thinly sliced raw beef to desired
    > doneness, then melt the cheese on top of it. Add onions if desired. If
    > the meat is precooked, it's not a cheesesteak sandwich. It's roast
    > beef with melted cheese. Tasty. But don't call it a cheesesteak.


    I made no mention of using any sort of pre-cooked meat. Read it
    again. I was mocking your requirement that it had to be "steak".

    -sw

  14. #14
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    sf wrote:
    > On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 14:24:36 -0500, "Steve Freides" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> One of our favorite things to do here is make Philly cheesesteak
    >> sandwiches - we don't do it often enough.
    >>
    >> While you can buy "chip" steak frozen at the grocery store, which
    >> seems to be a pretty close duplicate of what you get in the
    >> authentic thing in Philly, we have found an alternative we far
    >> prefer: buy roast beef from the deli counter, which is almost always
    >> cooked very rare, and ask for it to be sliced very thin.
    >>
    >> Fry the rare roast beef in the oil of your choice to get rid of most
    >> or all of the pink in it. (There is no such thing as a rare Philly
    >> cheesesteak, but you can keep your roast beef rare if you wish, but
    >> it needs to be grilled or fried for sure, IMHO.) Here, as we take
    >> the beef out of the frying pan, we put a little sea salt and fresh
    >> black pepper on it.
    >>
    >> Buy yourself some soft, long rolls, add the cheese of your choice and
    >> whatever else you like, and you're good to go. Here we do it this
    >> way:
    >>
    >> Open the long rolls, add extra sharp cheddar, sprinkle a bit of
    >> garlic powder and fresh ground black pepper, put in the toaster oven
    >> or broiler until golden brown.
    >>
    >> Put the meat on the cheesed rolls and you can be done, or you can add
    >> carmelized onions, peppers, or whatever other fried or fresh veggie
    >> you like, add ketchup or tomatoe sauce.
    >>
    >> Fairway's had their house roast beef on sale for $6.99 per pound,
    >> which was the inspiration for this.
    >>

    > I use deli sliced roast beef, which is salty enough for me, steak
    > rolls and provolone cheese. Other than that, what I do is almost
    > exactly what you do (minus the peppers - just onion for us). Never
    > thought about using garlic, which I love. Do they put garlic on
    > cheese steaks in Philly?


    No, we just like garlic at every reasonable opportunity here.
    Provolone is good, too. Mozarella and tomatoe sauce makes a "pizza
    steak", also good eating, IMHO.

    -S-



  15. #15
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    none of your business wrote:
    > On Jan 12, 6:58 pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >> On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 14:23:28 -0800 (PST), none of your business
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> that's a hot roast beef and cheese sandwich. I'm sure it's tasty,
    >>> but it's not a cheesesteak unless prepared with steak.

    >>
    >> So you actually have to cut a "steak" off of that top sirloin roast
    >> and then shave it rather than shaving off pieces of the whole top
    >> sirloin?
    >>
    >> Get real.
    >>
    >> -sw

    >
    > you get real. the idea is you grill thinly sliced raw beef to desired
    > doneness, then melt the cheese on top of it. Add onions if desired. If
    > the meat is precooked, it's not a cheesesteak sandwich. It's roast
    > beef with melted cheese. Tasty. But don't call it a cheesesteak.


    No, you get real. Those of us who grew up on cheesesteaks in Philly
    know that there's quite a bit of variety in how they're made. To me, a
    long roll, well-cooked, thin-sliced beef, and melted cheese satisfies
    the requirement for a cheesesteak. Rare roast beef of any sort doesn't
    taste like a Philly cheesesteak, the fact that it was partially
    precooked not withstanding - I've never had deli roast before that
    dripped blood when I opened the package at home - now that's rare roast
    beef, and I'm happy to eat it that way, but for this purpose, I cooked
    it more.

    And for me, a cheesesteak isn't a cheesesteak without fried onions, but
    I know there are some who don't like onions, even in Philly. Peppers
    and anything else should be considered optional.

    One variation I get in and around Philly that I like is a cheesesteak
    hoagie, basically a cheesesteak sandwich but with mayo on the roll and
    lettuce and tomatoe. It's a great way to have your cheesesteak and your
    vegetables, too.

    It's worth noting that, although you can find these outside of the
    Philly area, I've never had a decent one except in metro Philadelphia or
    the Jersey shore (where lots of Philly pholks vacation).

    -S-



  16. #16
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It's worth noting that, although you can find these outside of the
    > Philly area, I've never had a decent one except in metro Philadelphia

    or
    > the Jersey shore (where lots of Philly pholks vacation).



    Steve,

    In my early days in Philly, the matriarch of my (then) wife owned a
    house in Margate, NJ, a block off the bay side. Wife, Sis-IL and I got
    the house for a weekend.

    One late afternoon they took me to Maynard's Bar & Grill (right on the
    bay side) for drinks and dinner.

    I ordered a Philly cheesesteak. It was awful. Not rib eye, not top
    round, probably rump. It was hacked into irregular hunks, and was tough
    as heck to chew. I didn't finish it.

    It's not fair to generalize from that one experience but I couldn't help
    it. We walked out and I thought, geez... not only can New Jersey NOT
    make a fair Philly cheesesteak but it can't even make a fair
    cheesesteak!

    That's how I adopted the saying that "if it's not made in Philly it's
    only a cheesesteak." I know that's a weak claim. For example, Buffalo
    wings go by that name everywhere. Perhaps "if you can't make a famous
    Philly cheesesteak, it's only a cheesesteak." ???

    Sis-IL came to visit us in L.A. and in our very own kitchen taught me
    how to make cheesesteaks. Complete with exacting technique and flair.

    I knew her Philly Cheesesteaks on prior visits there and the ones she
    made in our kitchen were just as great as the ones she made in Philly.

    Before long my cheesesteaks were requested more than cheeseburgers. "As
    good as a great Philly cheesesteak" was my claim, in honor of my Philly
    cheesesteak mentor and Sis-IL and my future home.

    BTW, your cheesesteak version reminded me more of a famous Chicago
    Italian beef sandwich, as seen on TV.

    </vent>

    Best,

    Andy

  17. #17
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    On Thu, 13 Jan 2011 09:26:09 -0500, "Steve Freides" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > It's worth noting that, although you can find these outside of the
    > Philly area, I've never had a decent one except in metro Philadelphia or
    > the Jersey shore (where lots of Philly pholks vacation).


    I'm starting to get the picture. The ideal Philly cheesesteak is like
    the ideal NY bagel. It's in the eye of the beholder.

    --

    Carrot cake counts as a serving of vegetables.

  18. #18
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 18:49:00 -0800 (PST), none of your business wrote:

    > On Jan 12, 6:58*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >> On Wed, 12 Jan 2011 14:23:28 -0800 (PST), none of your business wrote:
    >>
    >>> that's a hot roast beef and cheese sandwich. I'm sure it's tasty, but
    >>> it's not a cheesesteak unless prepared with steak.

    >>
    >> So you actually have to cut a "steak" off of that top sirloin roast
    >> and then shave it rather than shaving off pieces of the whole top
    >> sirloin?
    >>
    >> Get real.
    >>
    >> -sw

    >
    > you get real. the idea is you grill thinly sliced raw beef to desired
    > doneness, then melt the cheese on top of it. Add onions if desired. If
    > the meat is precooked, it's not a cheesesteak sandwich. It's roast
    > beef with melted cheese. Tasty. But don't call it a cheesesteak.


    with or without beans?

    your pal,
    blake

  19. #19
    Zeppo Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef



    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Thu, 13 Jan 2011 09:26:09 -0500, "Steve Freides" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> It's worth noting that, although you can find these outside of the
    >> Philly area, I've never had a decent one except in metro Philadelphia or
    >> the Jersey shore (where lots of Philly pholks vacation).

    >
    > I'm starting to get the picture. The ideal Philly cheesesteak is like
    > the ideal NY bagel. It's in the eye of the beholder.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Carrot cake counts as a serving of vegetables.



    Just like the N.Y. bagel and the SF sourdough loaf, the Philly cheesesteak
    relies on a Philly-made roll. It's in the water.

    Jon


  20. #20
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Philly Cheesesteak w/ Deli Roast Beef

    On Thu, 13 Jan 2011 15:22:02 -0500, "Zeppo" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > > On Thu, 13 Jan 2011 09:26:09 -0500, "Steve Freides" <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> It's worth noting that, although you can find these outside of the
    > >> Philly area, I've never had a decent one except in metro Philadelphia or
    > >> the Jersey shore (where lots of Philly pholks vacation).

    > >
    > > I'm starting to get the picture. The ideal Philly cheesesteak is like
    > > the ideal NY bagel. It's in the eye of the beholder.
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > Carrot cake counts as a serving of vegetables.

    >
    >
    > Just like the N.Y. bagel and the SF sourdough loaf, the Philly cheesesteak
    > relies on a Philly-made roll. It's in the water.
    >

    SF sourdough doesn't rely on local water. It's the local wild yeast
    that makes it SF. Notbob says he can buy great SF style sourdough in
    Colorado now.

    --

    Carrot cake counts as a serving of vegetables.

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