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Thread: Pepper heat?

  1. #1
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Pepper heat?

    Is there any way to tell the approximate heat of a pepper when you buy it?
    I got my jalapenos at Winco because they sell a lot of Mexican food. They
    smelled wonderful! I bought 5 because I didn't know the heat level of them.
    Actually there was none. Tasted almost like a bell pepper but not quite.
    So I was a bit disappointed. I made the Frijoles Charros and although
    delicious, I would have liked a hint of heat in there. I have added some
    green Tabasco sauce to my bowl tonight.

    I don't like really hot food but I do like a hint of heat in there. I like
    the black bean soup at a local restaurant but there again, I never know how
    it will be. Twice it was so bland that I didn't want to finish it. And a
    few times it was so spicy that when I drank the broth I was choking on it.
    I did actually like it even then!

    Sure would be nice to be able to tell when you buy the peppers. But I am
    thinking that you can't.

    And if you can't... What would be the next hotter pepper? Serrano? I once
    bought some of these when I was making stuffed Anaheims. The men in my
    family like a LOT of heat and I wanted to make these for them. The store I
    bought those peppers at only had a few jalapenos. They turned out to be
    really weak as did the serranos. So the end result was not nearly hot
    enough for them. That store didn't have a big selection of peppers and I
    think those were the only two that they had in stock. They may actually
    sell others but on that day that was all the have.

    Winco probably has most all peppers, although perhaps not the ghost pepper.
    I do know not to buy that. But the next time I make this, I might want to
    pick up a couple of slightly hotter peppers, just in case.



  2. #2
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?

    Julie Bove wrote:
    > Is there any way to tell the approximate heat of a pepper when you buy it?
    > I got my jalapenos at Winco because they sell a lot of Mexican food. They
    > smelled wonderful! I bought 5 because I didn't know the heat level of them.
    > Actually there was none. Tasted almost like a bell pepper but not quite.
    > So I was a bit disappointed. I made the Frijoles Charros and although
    > delicious, I would have liked a hint of heat in there. I have added some
    > green Tabasco sauce to my bowl tonight.
    >
    > I don't like really hot food but I do like a hint of heat in there. I like
    > the black bean soup at a local restaurant but there again, I never know how
    > it will be. Twice it was so bland that I didn't want to finish it. And a
    > few times it was so spicy that when I drank the broth I was choking on it.
    > I did actually like it even then!
    >
    > Sure would be nice to be able to tell when you buy the peppers. But I am
    > thinking that you can't.
    >
    > And if you can't... What would be the next hotter pepper? Serrano? I once
    > bought some of these when I was making stuffed Anaheims. The men in my
    > family like a LOT of heat and I wanted to make these for them. The store I
    > bought those peppers at only had a few jalapenos. They turned out to be
    > really weak as did the serranos. So the end result was not nearly hot
    > enough for them. That store didn't have a big selection of peppers and I
    > think those were the only two that they had in stock. They may actually
    > sell others but on that day that was all the have.
    >
    > Winco probably has most all peppers, although perhaps not the ghost pepper.
    > I do know not to buy that. But the next time I make this, I might want to
    > pick up a couple of slightly hotter peppers, just in case.
    >
    >



    Serranos are usually hotter than jalapeños, but they are seedier, and
    lately even they are sometimes not hot.

    With jalapeños, the best two indicators that I've found for getting hot
    ones: 1) buy the ones with cracks that look like they have some kind of
    virus. 2) buy the red ones, assuming they look fresh (those awful mild
    green ones will turn red eventually if they sit there long enough, but
    they'll look pretty wilted by then)

    You also might try red Fresno peppers. They look like jalapeños but
    they are pointier and are always sold fully-red.

    HTH, :-)
    Bob

  3. #3
    gregz Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?

    zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Julie Bove wrote:
    >> Is there any way to tell the approximate heat of a pepper when you buy
    >> it? > I got my jalapenos at Winco because they sell a lot of Mexican
    >> food. They > smelled wonderful! I bought 5 because I didn't know the
    >> heat level of them. > Actually there was none. Tasted almost like a
    >> bell pepper but not quite. > So I was a bit disappointed. I made the
    >> Frijoles Charros and although > delicious, I would have liked a hint of
    >> heat in there. I have added some > green Tabasco sauce to my bowl tonight.
    >>> I don't like really hot food but I do like a hint of heat in there. I
    >>> like > the black bean soup at a local restaurant but there again, I
    >>> never know how > it will be. Twice it was so bland that I didn't want
    >>> to finish it. And a > few times it was so spicy that when I drank the
    >>> broth I was choking on it. > I did actually like it even then!
    >>> Sure would be nice to be able to tell when you buy the peppers. But I
    >>> am > thinking that you can't.
    >>> And if you can't... What would be the next hotter pepper? Serrano? I
    >>> once > bought some of these when I was making stuffed Anaheims. The
    >>> men in my > family like a LOT of heat and I wanted to make these for
    >>> them. The store I > bought those peppers at only had a few jalapenos.
    >>> They turned out to be > really weak as did the serranos. So the end
    >>> result was not nearly hot > enough for them. That store didn't have a
    >>> big selection of peppers and I > think those were the only two that
    >>> they had in stock. They may actually > sell others but on that day
    >>> that was all the have.
    >>> Winco probably has most all peppers, although perhaps not the ghost
    >>> pepper. > I do know not to buy that. But the next time I make this, I
    >>> might want to > pick up a couple of slightly hotter peppers, just in case. > >

    >
    > Serranos are usually hotter than jalapeños, but they are seedier, and
    > lately even they are sometimes not hot.
    >
    > With jalapeños, the best two indicators that I've found for getting hot
    > ones: 1) buy the ones with cracks that look like they have some kind of
    > virus. 2) buy the red ones, assuming they look fresh (those awful mild
    > green ones will turn red eventually if they sit there long enough, but
    > they'll look pretty wilted by then)
    >
    > You also might try red Fresno peppers. They look like jalapeños but they
    > are pointier and are always sold fully-red.
    >
    > HTH, :-)
    > Bob


    Last year I had grew cracked jalapeños, I think they were hot. Most I get
    at store are not hot. The only way I test, is bite. I keep a bottle of
    daves insanity sauce, in case something needs more hot, but 1 drop is
    usually enough for a dish.

    Greg

  4. #4
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?


    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Julie Bove wrote:
    >> Is there any way to tell the approximate heat of a pepper when you buy
    >> it? I got my jalapenos at Winco because they sell a lot of Mexican food.
    >> They smelled wonderful! I bought 5 because I didn't know the heat level
    >> of them. Actually there was none. Tasted almost like a bell pepper but
    >> not quite. So I was a bit disappointed. I made the Frijoles Charros and
    >> although delicious, I would have liked a hint of heat in there. I have
    >> added some green Tabasco sauce to my bowl tonight.
    >>
    >> I don't like really hot food but I do like a hint of heat in there. I
    >> like the black bean soup at a local restaurant but there again, I never
    >> know how it will be. Twice it was so bland that I didn't want to finish
    >> it. And a few times it was so spicy that when I drank the broth I was
    >> choking on it. I did actually like it even then!
    >>
    >> Sure would be nice to be able to tell when you buy the peppers. But I am
    >> thinking that you can't.
    >>
    >> And if you can't... What would be the next hotter pepper? Serrano? I
    >> once bought some of these when I was making stuffed Anaheims. The men in
    >> my family like a LOT of heat and I wanted to make these for them. The
    >> store I bought those peppers at only had a few jalapenos. They turned
    >> out to be really weak as did the serranos. So the end result was not
    >> nearly hot enough for them. That store didn't have a big selection of
    >> peppers and I think those were the only two that they had in stock. They
    >> may actually sell others but on that day that was all the have.
    >>
    >> Winco probably has most all peppers, although perhaps not the ghost
    >> pepper. I do know not to buy that. But the next time I make this, I
    >> might want to pick up a couple of slightly hotter peppers, just in case.

    >
    >
    > Serranos are usually hotter than jalapeños, but they are seedier, and
    > lately even they are sometimes not hot.
    >
    > With jalapeños, the best two indicators that I've found for getting hot
    > ones: 1) buy the ones with cracks that look like they have some kind of
    > virus. 2) buy the red ones, assuming they look fresh (those awful mild
    > green ones will turn red eventually if they sit there long enough, but
    > they'll look pretty wilted by then)
    >
    > You also might try red Fresno peppers. They look like jalapeños but they
    > are pointier and are always sold fully-red.
    >
    > HTH, :-)
    > Bob


    Ahhhhhh! Silly me! I did see the cracks and thought they were old or bad
    or...I don't know. I will get those next time. They didn't have any red
    ones. Just green. I will look for the Fresnos too.



  5. #5
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?


    "gregz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected].org...
    > zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Julie Bove wrote:
    >>> Is there any way to tell the approximate heat of a pepper when you buy
    >>> it? > I got my jalapenos at Winco because they sell a lot of Mexican
    >>> food. They > smelled wonderful! I bought 5 because I didn't know the
    >>> heat level of them. > Actually there was none. Tasted almost like a
    >>> bell pepper but not quite. > So I was a bit disappointed. I made the
    >>> Frijoles Charros and although > delicious, I would have liked a hint of
    >>> heat in there. I have added some > green Tabasco sauce to my bowl
    >>> tonight.
    >>>> I don't like really hot food but I do like a hint of heat in there. I
    >>>> like > the black bean soup at a local restaurant but there again, I
    >>>> never know how > it will be. Twice it was so bland that I didn't want
    >>>> to finish it. And a > few times it was so spicy that when I drank the
    >>>> broth I was choking on it. > I did actually like it even then!
    >>>> Sure would be nice to be able to tell when you buy the peppers. But I
    >>>> am > thinking that you can't.
    >>>> And if you can't... What would be the next hotter pepper? Serrano? I
    >>>> once > bought some of these when I was making stuffed Anaheims. The
    >>>> men in my > family like a LOT of heat and I wanted to make these for
    >>>> them. The store I > bought those peppers at only had a few jalapenos.
    >>>> They turned out to be > really weak as did the serranos. So the end
    >>>> result was not nearly hot > enough for them. That store didn't have a
    >>>> big selection of peppers and I > think those were the only two that
    >>>> they had in stock. They may actually > sell others but on that day
    >>>> that was all the have.
    >>>> Winco probably has most all peppers, although perhaps not the ghost
    >>>> pepper. > I do know not to buy that. But the next time I make this, I
    >>>> might want to > pick up a couple of slightly hotter peppers, just in
    >>>> case. > >

    >>
    >> Serranos are usually hotter than jalapeños, but they are seedier, and
    >> lately even they are sometimes not hot.
    >>
    >> With jalapeños, the best two indicators that I've found for getting hot
    >> ones: 1) buy the ones with cracks that look like they have some kind of
    >> virus. 2) buy the red ones, assuming they look fresh (those awful mild
    >> green ones will turn red eventually if they sit there long enough, but
    >> they'll look pretty wilted by then)
    >>
    >> You also might try red Fresno peppers. They look like jalapeños but they
    >> are pointier and are always sold fully-red.
    >>
    >> HTH, :-)
    >> Bob

    >
    > Last year I had grew cracked jalapeños, I think they were hot. Most I get
    > at store are not hot. The only way I test, is bite. I keep a bottle of
    > daves insanity sauce, in case something needs more hot, but 1 drop is
    > usually enough for a dish.


    Thanks!



  6. #6
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?

    On Tue, 2 Oct 2012 20:01:24 -0700, Julie Bove wrote:

    > Is there any way to tell the approximate heat of a pepper when you buy it?
    > I got my jalapenos at Winco because they sell a lot of Mexican food. They
    > smelled wonderful! I bought 5 because I didn't know the heat level of them.
    > Actually there was none. Tasted almost like a bell pepper but not quite.


    The bigger and better looking they are, the more tasteless and
    heatless they. In general - there will of course be exceptions. Look
    for japs with white "veins " on the skin. I doubt you'd buy those as
    you would perceive them as yucky defects.

    If you get heatless/tasteless jalapenos, return them to the store for
    a refund and thank them for wasting your time. That's the only way
    grocers are going to get the message that the new breed of jalapenoes
    are not acceptable.

    -sw

  7. #7
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 2 Oct 2012 20:01:24 -0700, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >> Is there any way to tell the approximate heat of a pepper when you buy
    >> it?
    >> I got my jalapenos at Winco because they sell a lot of Mexican food.
    >> They
    >> smelled wonderful! I bought 5 because I didn't know the heat level of
    >> them.
    >> Actually there was none. Tasted almost like a bell pepper but not quite.

    >
    > The bigger and better looking they are, the more tasteless and
    > heatless they. In general - there will of course be exceptions. Look
    > for japs with white "veins " on the skin. I doubt you'd buy those as
    > you would perceive them as yucky defects.


    Yes. That's exactly what I did.
    >
    > If you get heatless/tasteless jalapenos, return them to the store for
    > a refund and thank them for wasting your time. That's the only way
    > grocers are going to get the message that the new breed of jalapenoes
    > are not acceptable.


    Thanks!



  8. #8
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?

    On 2012-10-03, zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Sure would be nice to be able to tell when you buy the peppers. But I am
    >> thinking that you can't.


    Bingo!

    Like people, all plants are different.

    > Serranos are usually hotter than jalapeños, but they are seedier, and
    > lately even they are sometimes not hot.


    The key here being "usually". Like the other stuff in sprmkt produce
    depts, most produce is far from what it could be or even what it used
    to be. I used to think I could eat jalapenos with impunity, that they
    were the wimps of the hot pepper scale and I was beyond them. That
    fallacy was laid soundly to rest when I ate a home grown jalapeno from
    my neighbors garden and it blew my doors off! ...ack! ....ack!
    Wa-wa....

    nb

    --
    Definition of objectivism:
    "Eff you! I got mine."
    http://www.nongmoproject.org/

  9. #9
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?

    On Tuesday, October 2, 2012 10:50:36 PM UTC-5, gregz wrote:
    > zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Julie Bove wrote:

    >
    > >> Is there any way to tell the approximate heat of a pepper when you buy

    >
    > >> it? > I got my jalapenos at Winco because they sell a lot of Mexican

    >
    > >> food. They > smelled wonderful! I bought 5 because I didn't know the

    >
    > >> heat level of them. > Actually there was none. Tasted almost like a

    >
    > >> bell pepper but not quite. > So I was a bit disappointed. I made the

    >
    > >> Frijoles Charros and although > delicious, I would have liked a hint of

    >
    > >> heat in there. I have added some > green Tabasco sauce to my bowl tonight.

    >
    > >>> I don't like really hot food but I do like a hint of heat in there. I

    >
    > >>> like > the black bean soup at a local restaurant but there again, I

    >
    > >>> never know how > it will be. Twice it was so bland that I didn't want

    >
    > >>> to finish it. And a > few times it was so spicy that when I drank the

    >
    > >>> broth I was choking on it. > I did actually like it even then!

    >
    > >>> Sure would be nice to be able to tell when you buy the peppers. But I

    >
    > >>> am > thinking that you can't.

    >
    > >>> And if you can't... What would be the next hotter pepper? Serrano? I

    >
    > >>> once > bought some of these when I was making stuffed Anaheims. The

    >
    > >>> men in my > family like a LOT of heat and I wanted to make these for

    >
    > >>> them. The store I > bought those peppers at only had a few jalapenos..

    >
    > >>> They turned out to be > really weak as did the serranos. So the end

    >
    > >>> result was not nearly hot > enough for them. That store didn't have a

    >
    > >>> big selection of peppers and I > think those were the only two that

    >
    > >>> they had in stock. They may actually > sell others but on that day

    >
    > >>> that was all the have.

    >
    > >>> Winco probably has most all peppers, although perhaps not the ghost

    >
    > >>> pepper. > I do know not to buy that. But the next time I make this, I

    >
    > >>> might want to > pick up a couple of slightly hotter peppers, just in case. > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Serranos are usually hotter than jalapeños, but they are seedier, and

    >
    > > lately even they are sometimes not hot.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > With jalapeños, the best two indicators that I've found for getting hot

    >
    > > ones: 1) buy the ones with cracks that look like they have some kind of

    >
    > > virus. 2) buy the red ones, assuming they look fresh (those awful mild

    >
    > > green ones will turn red eventually if they sit there long enough, but

    >
    > > they'll look pretty wilted by then)

    >
    > >

    >
    > > You also might try red Fresno peppers. They look like jalapeños but they

    >
    > > are pointier and are always sold fully-red.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > HTH, :-)

    >
    > > Bob

    >
    >
    >
    > Last year I had grew cracked jalapeños, I think they were hot. Most I get
    >
    > at store are not hot. The only way I test, is bite. I keep a bottle of
    >
    > daves insanity sauce, in case something needs more hot, but 1 drop is
    >
    > usually enough for a dish.
    >

    Dave's Insanity is hot, but not anywhere near as hot as Pure Cap. Plus, Pure Cap has no flavor: http://www.cosmicchile.com/site/pure-cap.html

    I have a BBQ saucing regimen using Pure Cap that I have perfected. Take a bowl full of your favorite BBQ sauce (I use Maull's Genuine)and add to it afew drops of Pure Cap. Use 2/3-3/4 of the sauce for the first basting. Now refill the bowl and stir the new sauce in with the old, but do not add more Pure Cap. Repeat for the 3rd and final basting.
    >
    > Greg


    --Bryan

  10. #10
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?

    On 3 Oct 2012 11:47:08 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 2012-10-03, zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>> Sure would be nice to be able to tell when you buy the peppers. But I am
    >>> thinking that you can't.

    >
    >Bingo!
    >
    >Like people, all plants are different.
    >
    >> Serranos are usually hotter than jalapeños, but they are seedier, and
    >> lately even they are sometimes not hot.

    >
    >The key here being "usually". Like the other stuff in sprmkt produce
    >depts, most produce is far from what it could be or even what it used
    >to be. I used to think I could eat jalapenos with impunity, that they
    >were the wimps of the hot pepper scale and I was beyond them. That
    >fallacy was laid soundly to rest when I ate a home grown jalapeno from
    >my neighbors garden and it blew my doors off! ...ack! ....ack!
    >Wa-wa....
    >
    >nb

    This year, when I slice one of my jalapenos open, I immediately begin
    to cough -- the vapors are that strong. They are the same variety I
    always grow; they are just much stronger this year.
    Janet US

  11. #11
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?


    "notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On 2012-10-03, zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>> Sure would be nice to be able to tell when you buy the peppers. But I
    >>> am
    >>> thinking that you can't.

    >
    > Bingo!
    >
    > Like people, all plants are different.
    >
    >> Serranos are usually hotter than jalapeños, but they are seedier, and
    >> lately even they are sometimes not hot.

    >
    > The key here being "usually". Like the other stuff in sprmkt produce
    > depts, most produce is far from what it could be or even what it used
    > to be. I used to think I could eat jalapenos with impunity, that they
    > were the wimps of the hot pepper scale and I was beyond them. That
    > fallacy was laid soundly to rest when I ate a home grown jalapeno from
    > my neighbors garden and it blew my doors off! ...ack! ....ack!
    > Wa-wa....
    >
    > nb


    I grew them one year and mine were pretty hot.



  12. #12
    pltrgyst Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?

    On 10/2/12 11:01 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
    > Is there any way to tell the approximate heat of a pepper when you buy it?


    You can estimate based on the pepper type, but you can never be certain.

    Two weeks ago, I bought a basket of poblanos at the local farmer's
    market, and they were much, much hotter than any poblano I've ever
    tasted before. The farmer told me that even mild peppers can gain a lot
    of heat if they're grown adjacent to hotter varieties.

    -- Larry


  13. #13
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?

    On 03/10/2012 10:15 AM, Janet Bostwick wrote:

    > This year, when I slice one of my jalapenos open, I immediately begin
    > to cough -- the vapors are that strong. They are the same variety I
    > always grow; they are just much stronger this year.
    >


    FWIW... I was unable to find the hot peppers I used to use for my hot
    red pepper jelly. Last year I had trouble finding them and thought that
    I could use 4 little Scotch Bonnets instead of four large hot red
    pepper. Holy cow !! That stuff was volatile. This year I bought some
    locally grown cherry peppers. After tasting a bit of one, I decided to
    use the whole quart basket along with the usual 3-4 red bell peppers.

    The jelly turned out great. It had great flavour and a nice bite of
    heat. I re-wrote the recipe that I had been using to show that
    substitution.


  14. #14
    gregz Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?

    Bryan <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Tuesday, October 2, 2012 10:50:36 PM UTC-5, gregz wrote:
    >> zxcvbob <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Julie Bove wrote:

    >>
    >>>> Is there any way to tell the approximate heat of a pepper when you buy

    >>
    >>>> it? > I got my jalapenos at Winco because they sell a lot of Mexican

    >>
    >>>> food. They > smelled wonderful! I bought 5 because I didn't know the

    >>
    >>>> heat level of them. > Actually there was none. Tasted almost like a

    >>
    >>>> bell pepper but not quite. > So I was a bit disappointed. I made the

    >>
    >>>> Frijoles Charros and although > delicious, I would have liked a hint of

    >>
    >>>> heat in there. I have added some > green Tabasco sauce to my bowl tonight.

    >>
    >>>>> I don't like really hot food but I do like a hint of heat in there. I

    >>
    >>>>> like > the black bean soup at a local restaurant but there again, I

    >>
    >>>>> never know how > it will be. Twice it was so bland that I didn't want

    >>
    >>>>> to finish it. And a > few times it was so spicy that when I drank the

    >>
    >>>>> broth I was choking on it. > I did actually like it even then!

    >>
    >>>>> Sure would be nice to be able to tell when you buy the peppers. But I

    >>
    >>>>> am > thinking that you can't.

    >>
    >>>>> And if you can't... What would be the next hotter pepper? Serrano? I

    >>
    >>>>> once > bought some of these when I was making stuffed Anaheims. The

    >>
    >>>>> men in my > family like a LOT of heat and I wanted to make these for

    >>
    >>>>> them. The store I > bought those peppers at only had a few jalapenos.

    >>
    >>>>> They turned out to be > really weak as did the serranos. So the end

    >>
    >>>>> result was not nearly hot > enough for them. That store didn't have a

    >>
    >>>>> big selection of peppers and I > think those were the only two that

    >>
    >>>>> they had in stock. They may actually > sell others but on that day

    >>
    >>>>> that was all the have.

    >>
    >>>>> Winco probably has most all peppers, although perhaps not the ghost

    >>
    >>>>> pepper. > I do know not to buy that. But the next time I make this, I

    >>
    >>>>> might want to > pick up a couple of slightly hotter peppers, just in case. > >

    >>
    >>>

    >>
    >>> Serranos are usually hotter than jalapeños, but they are seedier, and

    >>
    >>> lately even they are sometimes not hot.

    >>
    >>>

    >>
    >>> With jalapeños, the best two indicators that I've found for getting hot

    >>
    >>> ones: 1) buy the ones with cracks that look like they have some kind of

    >>
    >>> virus. 2) buy the red ones, assuming they look fresh (those awful mild

    >>
    >>> green ones will turn red eventually if they sit there long enough, but

    >>
    >>> they'll look pretty wilted by then)

    >>
    >>>

    >>
    >>> You also might try red Fresno peppers. They look like jalapeños but they

    >>
    >>> are pointier and are always sold fully-red.

    >>
    >>>

    >>
    >>> HTH, :-)

    >>
    >>> Bob

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Last year I had grew cracked jalapeños, I think they were hot. Most I get
    >>
    >> at store are not hot. The only way I test, is bite. I keep a bottle of
    >>
    >> daves insanity sauce, in case something needs more hot, but 1 drop is
    >>
    >> usually enough for a dish.
    >>

    > Dave's Insanity is hot, but not anywhere near as hot as Pure Cap. Plus,
    > Pure Cap has no flavor: http://www.cosmicchile.com/site/pure-cap.html
    >
    > I have a BBQ saucing regimen using Pure Cap that I have perfected. Take
    > a bowl full of your favorite BBQ sauce (I use Maull's Genuine)and add to
    > it a few drops of Pure Cap. Use 2/3-3/4 of the sauce for the first
    > basting. Now refill the bowl and stir the new sauce in with the old, but
    > do not add more Pure Cap. Repeat for the 3rd and final basting.
    >>
    >> Greg

    >
    > --Bryan


    I don't see the purpose of making things all hot. You can always add hot to
    your own taste later.

    Greg

  15. #15
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?

    On 03/10/2012 12:47 PM, gregz wrote:

    > I don't see the purpose of making things all hot. You can always add hot to
    > your own taste later.


    Heat can be good. Some people like it more than others. Some can handle
    it better than others. Then there are some who consider it some sort of
    badge of honour to be able to eat it hotter than anyone else, and
    pretend that they actually enjoy it.


  16. #16
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?

    On 2012-10-03, Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Heat can be good. Some people like it more than others. Some can handle
    > it better than others. Then there are some who consider it some sort of
    > badge of honour to be able to eat it hotter than anyone else, and
    > pretend that they actually enjoy it.


    I'm not into machismo pepper eating, but was somewhat surprised when I
    tasted Tabasco Habanero sauce, which I'd purchased by mistake. I'd
    heard for a long time that habanero chiles have their own very good
    flavor, but was not about to risk my mouth to find out. Turns out my
    long time Sriracha and regular Tobasco ingestion has raised my
    capsacin threshhold somewhat and I can actually tolerate jes a bit of
    Tobasco Habanero and it is, in fact, pretty darn tasty. I've found
    myself using it in small amounts, jes for the flavor, to the point I
    need to buy another bottle. Whodda thunk it.

    Eating hot chiles should not be an end unto itself, but I've found
    that eating 'em, even in small amounts, naturally increases one's
    tolerance to capsacin. It's taken me many many years to increase my
    enjoyment of hot chiles, but it has occurred, regardless of my intent,
    and I can now eat some pretty potent stuff without any real
    discomfort.

    nb

    --
    Definition of objectivism:
    "Eff you! I got mine."
    http://www.nongmoproject.org/

  17. #17
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?

    On 3 Oct 2012 17:14:42 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Eating hot chiles should not be an end unto itself, but I've found
    >that eating 'em, even in small amounts, naturally increases one's
    >tolerance to capsacin. It's taken me many many years to increase my
    >enjoyment of hot chiles, but it has occurred, regardless of my intent,
    >and I can now eat some pretty potent stuff without any real
    >discomfort.


    I found that out, living here in NM. Chiles are everywhere here..and
    most of them are not mild. I go to places like CA and people will
    tell me that such and such dish is very, very spicy hot. I will take
    a bite and find it to be mild.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  18. #18
    Colt T Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?

    According to a page on hot peppers that I saved hot wax peppers are a
    good bit hotter than jalapenos. It said if you let them get red ripe
    they were too hot for anything but I have fried them in potatoes and
    liked it fine.


  19. #19
    Colt T Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?

    I empty a cayenne cap into my tomato juice every am.


  20. #20
    Gill Smith Guest

    Default Re: Pepper heat?

    "Colt T" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > According to a page on hot peppers that I saved hot wax peppers are a
    > good bit hotter than jalapenos. It said if you let them get red ripe
    > they were too hot for anything but I have fried them in potatoes and
    > liked it fine.


    I heard it said if a pepper is too hot best antidote is a swig of milk

    if true, I wonder what the chemistry of that is

    --
    http://www.gillsmith999.plus.com/



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