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Thread: pear wine

  1. #1
    bulka Guest

    Default pear wine

    I have an excess of great sweet pears.

    Neighbors are tired of me offering them; have cases of canned ones
    from the last harvest; made some pies, chutney and pickles.

    I remember making "wine" out of beets, maybe pears, other things and
    it seems that it was more simple and without the exotic ingredients I
    see when I google "pear wine recipie" - campden tablets, pectic
    enzyme, acid blend.

    I think I just used pulp, sugar, regular yeast, let it sit in a jar
    for a few months and strained it.

    What do you think?

    Bulka

    For Saerah - I'm in Warren

  2. #2
    George Guest

    Default Re: pear wine

    bulka wrote:
    > I have an excess of great sweet pears.
    >
    > Neighbors are tired of me offering them; have cases of canned ones
    > from the last harvest; made some pies, chutney and pickles.
    >
    > I remember making "wine" out of beets, maybe pears, other things and
    > it seems that it was more simple and without the exotic ingredients I
    > see when I google "pear wine recipie" - campden tablets, pectic
    > enzyme, acid blend.
    >
    > I think I just used pulp, sugar, regular yeast, let it sit in a jar
    > for a few months and strained it.
    >
    > What do you think?
    >
    > Bulka
    >
    > For Saerah - I'm in Warren


    The purpose of the sulfites "campden tablets" is to inhibit wild yeast
    that came in with the fruit which means you have a better chance of
    getting a good result because you are using a known yeast strain. The
    purpose of the peptic enzyme is to reduce cloudiness by preventing the
    pectin that is in the fruit from gelling. You can certainly make wine
    without those additives which only guarantee you have a more consistent
    industrial result because some people like cloudiness or don't want the
    sulfites in their wine etc.

    In addition to the jar or whatever container you use for fermentation it
    is a good idea to use an air lock.

  3. #3
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: pear wine

    George wrote on Thu, 25 Sep 2008 11:38:30 -0400:

    > bulka wrote:
    >> I have an excess of great sweet pears.
    >>
    >> Neighbors are tired of me offering them; have cases of canned
    >> ones from the last harvest; made some pies, chutney and
    >> pickles.
    >>
    >> I remember making "wine" out of beets, maybe pears, other
    >> things and it seems that it was more simple and without the
    >> exotic ingredients I see when I google "pear wine recipie" - campden
    >> tablets, pectic enzyme, acid blend.
    >>
    >> I think I just used pulp, sugar, regular yeast, let it sit in
    >> a jar for a few months and strained it.
    >>
    >> What do you think?
    >>
    >> Bulka
    >>
    >> For Saerah - I'm in Warren


    > The purpose of the sulfites "campden tablets" is to inhibit
    > wild yeast that came in with the fruit which means you have a better
    > chance of getting a good result because you are using a
    > known yeast strain. The purpose of the peptic enzyme is to
    > reduce cloudiness by preventing the pectin that is in the
    > fruit from gelling. You can certainly make wine without those
    > additives which only guarantee you have a more consistent industrial
    > result because some people like cloudiness or don't
    > want the sulfites in their wine etc.


    You can make wine out of any sugar solution (under about 15% usually)
    if you add the right yeast. I'm told that pure sugar and wine yeast
    produces a rather blah result but it is alcohol!

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  4. #4
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: pear wine


    "bulka" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >I have an excess of great sweet pears.
    >
    > Neighbors are tired of me offering them; have cases of canned ones
    > from the last harvest; made some pies, chutney and pickles.
    >
    > I remember making "wine" out of beets, maybe pears, other things and
    > it seems that it was more simple and without the exotic ingredients I
    > see when I google "pear wine recipie" - campden tablets, pectic
    > enzyme, acid blend.
    >
    > I think I just used pulp, sugar, regular yeast, let it sit in a jar
    > for a few months and strained it.
    >
    > What do you think?
    >
    > Bulka
    >
    > For Saerah - I'm in Warren


    How about Pear Brandy?

    Got a still.

    Dimitri

    http://clearcreekdistillery.com/pear.html


  5. #5
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: pear wine

    On Sep 25, 11:38 am, George <geo...@nospam.invalid> wrote:
    > bulka wrote:
    > > I have an excess of great sweet pears.

    >
    > > Neighbors are tired of me offering them; have cases of canned ones
    > > from the last harvest; made some pies, chutney and pickles.

    >
    > > I remember making "wine" out of beets, maybe pears, other things and
    > > it seems that it was more simple and without the exotic ingredients I
    > > see when I google "pear wine recipie" - campden tablets, pectic
    > > enzyme, acid blend.

    >
    > > I think I just used pulp, sugar, regular yeast, let it sit in a jar
    > > for a few months and strained it.

    >
    > > What do you think?

    >
    > > Bulka

    >
    > > For Saerah - I'm in Warren

    >
    > The purpose of the sulfites "campden tablets" is to inhibit wild yeast
    > that came in with the fruit which means you have a better chance of
    > getting a good result because you are using a known yeast strain. The
    > purpose of the peptic enzyme is to reduce cloudiness by preventing the
    > pectin that is in the fruit from gelling. You can certainly make wine
    > without those additives which only guarantee you have a more consistent
    > industrial result because some people like cloudiness or don't want the
    > sulfites in their wine etc.
    >
    > In addition to the jar or whatever container you use for fermentation it
    > is a good idea to use an air lock.


    Thanks.

    If I can find a wine supply place, maybe I'll try to do it right.

    Meanwhile, I don't imagine the pears will be damaged if I freeze them
    for a while, before they spoil.

    mB

  6. #6
    fred Guest

    Default Re: pear wine

    On Sep 25, 2:16*pm, bulka <working.artists.work...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Sep 25, 11:38 am, George <geo...@nospam.invalid> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > bulka wrote:
    > > > I have an excess of great sweet pears.

    >
    > > > Neighbors are tired of me offering them; have cases of canned ones
    > > > from the last harvest; made some pies, chutney and pickles.

    >
    > > > I remember making "wine" out of beets, maybe pears, other things and
    > > > it seems that it was more simple and without the exotic ingredients I
    > > > see when I google "pear wine recipie" - campden tablets, pectic
    > > > enzyme, acid blend.

    >
    > > > I think I just used pulp, sugar, regular yeast, let it sit in a jar
    > > > for a few months and strained it.

    >
    > > > What do you think?

    >
    > > > Bulka

    >
    > > > For Saerah - I'm in Warren

    >
    > > The purpose of the sulfites "campden tablets" is to inhibit wild yeast
    > > that came in with the fruit which means you have a better chance of
    > > getting a good result because you are using a known yeast strain. The
    > > purpose of the peptic enzyme is to reduce cloudiness by preventing the
    > > pectin that is in the fruit from gelling. You can certainly make wine
    > > without those additives which only guarantee you have a more consistent
    > > industrial result because some people like cloudiness or don't want the
    > > sulfites in their wine etc.

    >
    > > In addition to the jar or whatever container you use for fermentation it
    > > is a good idea to use an air lock.

    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > If I can find a wine supply place, maybe I'll try to do it right.
    >
    > Meanwhile, I don't imagine the pears will be damaged if I freeze them
    > for a while, before they spoil.
    >
    > mB


    No, freezing won't hurt them, you're only interested in fermenting the
    sugar.

    Do use wine yeast, but don't worry about the sulfite (camden)
    tablets. Just "proof" your yeast, and get it really kicking butt
    before you add it to the pears, and it will beat out any wild yeast,
    and you should be fine.

  7. #7
    George Guest

    Default Re: pear wine

    bulka wrote:
    > On Sep 25, 11:38 am, George <geo...@nospam.invalid> wrote:
    >> bulka wrote:
    >>> I have an excess of great sweet pears.
    >>> Neighbors are tired of me offering them; have cases of canned ones
    >>> from the last harvest; made some pies, chutney and pickles.
    >>> I remember making "wine" out of beets, maybe pears, other things and
    >>> it seems that it was more simple and without the exotic ingredients I
    >>> see when I google "pear wine recipie" - campden tablets, pectic
    >>> enzyme, acid blend.
    >>> I think I just used pulp, sugar, regular yeast, let it sit in a jar
    >>> for a few months and strained it.
    >>> What do you think?
    >>> Bulka
    >>> For Saerah - I'm in Warren

    >> The purpose of the sulfites "campden tablets" is to inhibit wild yeast
    >> that came in with the fruit which means you have a better chance of
    >> getting a good result because you are using a known yeast strain. The
    >> purpose of the peptic enzyme is to reduce cloudiness by preventing the
    >> pectin that is in the fruit from gelling. You can certainly make wine
    >> without those additives which only guarantee you have a more consistent
    >> industrial result because some people like cloudiness or don't want the
    >> sulfites in their wine etc.
    >>
    >> In addition to the jar or whatever container you use for fermentation it
    >> is a good idea to use an air lock.

    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > If I can find a wine supply place, maybe I'll try to do it right.



    You really don't need the chemistry store stuff to make wine.
    Essentially you are mimicking how industrial wineries often make wine.
    Often the reason for making your own is to avoid the "better living
    through chemistry" stuff.

    >
    > Meanwhile, I don't imagine the pears will be damaged if I freeze them
    > for a while, before they spoil.
    >
    > mB


  8. #8
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: pear wine



    bulka wrote:
    >
    > I have an excess of great sweet pears.
    >
    > Neighbors are tired of me offering them; have cases of canned ones
    > from the last harvest; made some pies, chutney and pickles.
    >
    > I remember making "wine" out of beets, maybe pears, other things and
    > it seems that it was more simple and without the exotic ingredients I
    > see when I google "pear wine recipie" - campden tablets, pectic
    > enzyme, acid blend.
    >
    > I think I just used pulp, sugar, regular yeast, let it sit in a jar
    > for a few months and strained it.
    >
    > What do you think?
    >
    > Bulka



    Look up 'perry' which is a pear wine. It doesn't need all those
    chemicals in it; the drink goes back centuries.


    >


  9. #9
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: pear wine

    George wrote:
    >
    >
    > The purpose of the sulfites "campden tablets" is to inhibit wild yeast
    > that came in with the fruit which means you have a better chance of
    > getting a good result because you are using a known yeast strain. The
    > purpose of the peptic enzyme is to reduce cloudiness by preventing the
    > pectin that is in the fruit from gelling. You can certainly make wine
    > without those additives which only guarantee you have a more consistent
    > industrial result because some people like cloudiness or don't want the
    > sulfites in their wine etc.
    >
    > In addition to the jar or whatever container you use for fermentation it
    > is a good idea to use an air lock.




    I have a friend who makes a lot of wine, and some of it is pretty good.
    His elderberry wine was especially good. A few years ago we was given a
    lot of pear .... a LOT of pears, and I helped him make pear wine. We
    chopped them up and put them in a regular grape press to squeeze out the
    juice and he made did the wine thing. It turned out quite nicely.

  10. #10
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: pear wine

    Standard warning -- fermenting pears runs the ricks of a more
    than usual fraction of methanol in the result, compared to
    more usual fruit like grapes or even apples.

    Personally I'd avoid it.

    Steve

  11. #11
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: pear wine

    Yeah, wine has been made for centuries before the invention of chem
    labs. Fallen fruit ferments on the ground, birds and squirrels get
    drunk. How hard can it be?

    I like the natural idea, but I'm willing to learn the science (and
    kinda like buying cheap gadgets).

    I've found the address of a local wine supply store, and have a couple
    of books on request from the regional library, including "Wild Wine"-
    I'm looking forward to that one.

    Meanwhile, freezing a gallon or two of pear a day. By the time I'm
    ready to go, I'll be able to experiment both ways.

    And buying cheap jug wine, for the jugs.

    mB


  12. #12
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: pear wine

    On Sep 26, 11:40 pm, bulka <working.artists.work...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Yeah, wine has been made for centuries before the invention of chem
    > labs. Fallen fruit ferments on the ground, birds and squirrels get
    > drunk. How hard can it be?
    >
    > I like the natural idea, but I'm willing to learn the science (and
    > kinda like buying cheap gadgets).
    >
    > I've found the address of a local wine supply store, and have a couple
    > of books on request from the regional library, including "Wild Wine"-
    > I'm looking forward to that one.
    >
    > Meanwhile, freezing a gallon or two of pear a day. By the time I'm
    > ready to go, I'll be able to experiment both ways.
    >
    > And buying cheap jug wine, for the jugs.
    >
    > mB




    This from some guy at rec.gardens.edible

    http://home.comcast.net/~rbfarm/hrushka.html

    just the kind of hassle I want to avoid. I'll study it, though.

  13. #13
    Saerah Gray Guest

    Default Re: pear wine

    bulka <[email protected]> fnord news:2f9698fc-f7b3-48b9-
    [email protected]:

    > Bulka
    >
    > For Saerah - I'm in Warren
    >


    Hey, neighbor!
    (I'm in Oak Park)

    --
    Saerah

    "Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
    - some hillbilly from FL

  14. #14
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: pear wine

    bulka wrote:

    >
    > Meanwhile, freezing a gallon or two of pear a day. By the time I'm
    > ready to go, I'll be able to experiment both ways.
    >
    > And buying cheap jug wine, for the jugs.
    >
    > mB
    >


    I'd rather go to a restaurant in off hours and ask them to save
    some bottles for me.

    You will also be able to buy jugs at the wine supply place
    and not have to drink cheap wine to get them.

    gloria p
    "Life is too short to drink bad wine"

  15. #15
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: pear wine


    "Gloria P" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ..
    > bulka wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Meanwhile, freezing a gallon or two of pear a day. By the time I'm
    >> ready to go, I'll be able to experiment both ways.
    >>
    >> And buying cheap jug wine, for the jugs.
    >>
    >> mB
    >>

    >
    > I'd rather go to a restaurant in off hours and ask them to save
    > some bottles for me.
    >
    > You will also be able to buy jugs at the wine supply place
    > and not have to drink cheap wine to get them.
    >


    I'd probably ask friends to save their bottles for me, and maybe raid those
    little green recycle bins everyone puts out once a week.



  16. #16
    George Guest

    Default Re: pear wine

    bulka wrote:
    > Yeah, wine has been made for centuries before the invention of chem
    > labs. Fallen fruit ferments on the ground, birds and squirrels get
    > drunk. How hard can it be?
    >
    > I like the natural idea, but I'm willing to learn the science (and
    > kinda like buying cheap gadgets).
    >
    > I've found the address of a local wine supply store, and have a couple
    > of books on request from the regional library, including "Wild Wine"-
    > I'm looking forward to that one.
    >
    > Meanwhile, freezing a gallon or two of pear a day. By the time I'm
    > ready to go, I'll be able to experiment both ways.
    >
    > And buying cheap jug wine, for the jugs.
    >
    > mB
    >

    You can buy wine bottles at a wine making supply place. 750 ml are ~
    $1/each and 1.5l about $2/each and 1 gallon ~$3/each at a local place.
    You could also ask your friends to save bottles for you instead of
    buying cheap wine.

  17. #17
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: pear wine

    On Sep 27, 5:20 pm, "cybercat" <cyberpu...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "Gloria P" <gpues...@comcast.net> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected] ..
    >
    >
    >
    > > bulka wrote:

    >
    > >> Meanwhile, freezing a gallon or two of pear a day. By the time I'm
    > >> ready to go, I'll be able to experiment both ways.

    >
    > >> And buying cheap jug wine, for the jugs.

    >
    > >> mB

    >
    > > I'd rather go to a restaurant in off hours and ask them to save
    > > some bottles for me.

    >
    > > You will also be able to buy jugs at the wine supply place
    > > and not have to drink cheap wine to get them.

    >
    > I'd probably ask friends to save their bottles for me, and maybe raid those
    > little green recycle bins everyone puts out once a week.






    drifting here, but . . .

    a few years ago a friend was remodeling his garage. Wanted to do a
    folk-architecture kind of thing using wine bottles like glass block in
    the windows, but he didn't drink wine. So asked me to save mine for
    him. After a few months I had a bin full under the sink. I had to
    have a plumber come in. He looked at the bin, looked at me, said "Big
    party last night?"

    mB

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