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Thread: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

  1. #1
    DavidW Guest

    Default Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    AFAIK this sandwich doesn't exist at all here in Australia. I've never heard of
    anyone here eating it, yet I get the impression that it's very common in the
    U.S. I have heard that what Americans call jelly is more like what we would call
    jam. Is that true? (If so, what do Americans call what we call jelly?) Either
    way, it seems like a very odd combination of spreads to me. Do they really go
    together well?



  2. #2
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    On Jul 5, 3:57*pm, "DavidW" <n...@email.provided> wrote:
    > AFAIK this sandwich doesn't exist at all here in Australia. I've never heard of
    > anyone here eating it, yet I get the impression that it's very common in the
    > U.S. I have heard that what Americans call jelly is more like what we would call
    > jam. Is that true? (If so, what do Americans call what we call jelly?) Either
    > way, it seems like a very odd combination of spreads to me. Do they really go
    > together well?


    Jams here in the US tend to have seeds. Jellys are just smooth with
    nothing in them. and yes peanut butter and jelly go well together
    especially on toast or an english muffun!

  3. #3
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    On Fri, 6 Jul 2012 08:57:48 +1000, "DavidW" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >AFAIK this sandwich doesn't exist at all here in Australia. I've never heard of
    >anyone here eating it, yet I get the impression that it's very common in the
    >U.S. I have heard that what Americans call jelly is more like what we would call
    >jam. Is that true? (If so, what do Americans call what we call jelly?) Either
    >way, it seems like a very odd combination of spreads to me. Do they really go
    >together well?
    >


    Yeah, but you Aussies eat Vegemite, which has to be the vilest
    substance anyone ever called food! ;-)

    John Kuthe...

  4. #4
    DavidW Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    John Kuthe wrote:
    > On Fri, 6 Jul 2012 08:57:48 +1000, "DavidW" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Yeah, but you Aussies eat Vegemite, which has to be the vilest
    > substance anyone ever called food! ;-)


    I regularly have butter and Vegemite on toast. Yum!



  5. #5
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    DavidW wrote:

    > AFAIK this sandwich doesn't exist at all here in Australia. I've never heard of
    > anyone here eating it, yet I get the impression that it's very common in the
    > U.S. I have heard that what Americans call jelly is more like what we would call
    > jam. Is that true? (If so, what do Americans call what we call jelly?) Either
    > way, it seems like a very odd combination of spreads to me. Do they really go
    > together well?


    To troll or not to troll, that is the question....

    You can find out the difference among jam, jelly, and preserves by
    looking up the words in a dictionary.

    One point about American food culture: Jelly donuts rarely have actual
    jelly in them. As far as PB&J: Children like sweetened peanut butter
    and grape jelly on Wonder bread. (That's an abomination foisted on
    generations of ignorant homemakers by a huge food factory company.)
    When adults make PBJs for themselves, they typically use unadulterated
    PB and the preserves of their choice, sandwiched on real bread.



  6. #6
    DavidW Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    George M. Middius wrote:
    > DavidW wrote:
    >
    >> AFAIK this sandwich doesn't exist at all here in Australia. I've
    >> never heard of anyone here eating it, yet I get the impression that
    >> it's very common in the U.S. I have heard that what Americans call
    >> jelly is more like what we would call jam. Is that true? (If so,
    >> what do Americans call what we call jelly?) Either way, it seems
    >> like a very odd combination of spreads to me. Do they really go
    >> together well?

    >
    > To troll or not to troll, that is the question....


    So your first thought is that this was a troll? Ridiculous.

    > You can find out the difference among jam, jelly, and preserves by
    > looking up the words in a dictionary.


    But my point was that they have different meanings in different countries, and a
    dictionary is not likely to give the sort of information I'll get here. Why not
    just cancel the newsgroup altogether and everyone can get what they need
    cooking-wise from dictionaries, encyclopedias and recipe books?

    > One point about American food culture: Jelly donuts rarely have actual
    > jelly in them. As far as PB&J: Children like sweetened peanut butter
    > and grape jelly on Wonder bread. (That's an abomination foisted on
    > generations of ignorant homemakers by a huge food factory company.)
    > When adults make PBJs for themselves, they typically use unadulterated
    > PB and the preserves of their choice, sandwiched on real bread.


    Thank you. Would I have got that out of a dictionary?



  7. #7
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    On Jul 5, 8:13*pm, George M. Middius <glanb...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > DavidW wrote:
    > > AFAIK this sandwich doesn't exist at all here in Australia. I've never heard of
    > > anyone here eating it, yet I get the impression that it's very common in the
    > > U.S. I have heard that what Americans call jelly is more like what we would call
    > > jam. Is that true? (If so, what do Americans call what we call jelly?) Either
    > > way, it seems like a very odd combination of spreads to me. Do they really go
    > > together well?

    >
    > To troll or not to troll, that is the question....
    >
    > You can find out the difference among jam, jelly, and preserves by
    > looking up the words in a dictionary.
    >
    > One point about American food culture: Jelly donuts rarely have actual
    > jelly in them. As far as PB&J: Children like sweetened peanut butter
    > and grape jelly on Wonder bread. (That's an abomination foisted on
    > generations of ignorant homemakers by a huge food factory company.)
    > When adults make PBJs for themselves, they typically use unadulterated
    > PB and the preserves of their choice, sandwiched on real bread.


    Agh - a bad memory just surfaced. I had made and offered scratch
    blueberry muffins to a house guest - he wasn't interested, then
    proceeded to go buy some white bread a la Wonder and spread it with
    grape jelly. Talk about feeling insulted...he hasn't been in my house
    since.

  8. #8
    Christopher M. Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    "DavidW" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jt569o$42j$[email protected]..
    > AFAIK this sandwich doesn't exist at all here in Australia. I've never
    > heard of anyone here eating it, yet I get the impression that it's very
    > common in the U.S. I have heard that what Americans call jelly is more
    > like what we would call jam. Is that true? (If so, what do Americans call
    > what we call jelly?) Either way, it seems like a very odd combination of
    > spreads to me. Do they really go together well?


    I think the most common jelly in the US is concord grape jelly. I'd rather
    eat it, with pb, on buttery Ritz crackers than bread.

    I was looking at this Summer Desserts magazine (America's Test Kitchen)
    today and they had this blackberry cake with a brown sugar frosting. And I
    thought the combination of these flavors probably isn't much different than
    peanut butter and jelly.


    W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)



  9. #9
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    DavidW wrote:
    > AFAIK this sandwich doesn't exist at all here in Australia. I've
    > never heard of anyone here eating it, yet I get the impression that
    > it's very common in the U.S. I have heard that what Americans call
    > jelly is more like what we would call jam. Is that true? (If so, what
    > do Americans call what we call jelly?) Either way, it seems like a
    > very odd combination of spreads to me. Do they really go together
    > well?


    My mother liked to point out that PB&J was my lunch, 5 days a week, for
    a number of years when I was a child - she said I wouldn't have it any
    other way. I still enjoy it although I don't eat it terribly often
    because there are other ways I prefer to indulge my sweet tooth. But
    PB&J is still good enough that I've been known just to mix the two
    together and eat them - who needs a sandwich, anyway?

    I haven't bought peanut butter in years - I make my own nut butter -
    mostly almonds and described regularly on this newsgroup - and that
    works fine in place of peanut butter - we actually still call it peanut
    butter here even though it only has a small amount of peanuts in it.

    -S-



  10. #10
    Christopher M. Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    Kalmia wrote:
    > On Jul 5, 8:13 pm, George M. Middius <glanb...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> DavidW wrote:
    >>> AFAIK this sandwich doesn't exist at all here in Australia. I've
    >>> never heard of anyone here eating it, yet I get the impression that
    >>> it's very common in the U.S. I have heard that what Americans call
    >>> jelly is more like what we would call jam. Is that true? (If so,
    >>> what do Americans call what we call jelly?) Either way, it seems
    >>> like a very odd combination of spreads to me. Do they really go
    >>> together well?

    >>
    >> To troll or not to troll, that is the question....
    >>
    >> You can find out the difference among jam, jelly, and preserves by
    >> looking up the words in a dictionary.
    >>
    >> One point about American food culture: Jelly donuts rarely have
    >> actual jelly in them. As far as PB&J: Children like sweetened peanut
    >> butter and grape jelly on Wonder bread. (That's an abomination
    >> foisted on generations of ignorant homemakers by a huge food factory
    >> company.) When adults make PBJs for themselves, they typically use
    >> unadulterated PB and the preserves of their choice, sandwiched on
    >> real bread.

    >
    > Agh - a bad memory just surfaced. I had made and offered scratch
    > blueberry muffins to a house guest - he wasn't interested, then
    > proceeded to go buy some white bread a la Wonder and spread it with
    > grape jelly. Talk about feeling insulted...he hasn't been in my house
    > since.


    I love blueberry muffins.

    Concord grapes are pretty tasty.

    Was the bread toasted and buttered? Pan fried in butter?


    W. Pooh (AKA Winnie P.)



  11. #11
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    On Fri, 6 Jul 2012 08:57:48 +1000, DavidW wrote:

    > AFAIK this sandwich doesn't exist at all here in Australia. I've never heard of
    > anyone here eating it, yet I get the impression that it's very common in the
    > U.S. I have heard that what Americans call jelly is more like what we would call
    > jam. Is that true? (If so, what do Americans call what we call jelly?) Either
    > way, it seems like a very odd combination of spreads to me. Do they really go
    > together well?


    How are we supposed to know any better than you? You didn't describe
    your Australian jams or jellies so how are those of Americans supposed
    to know of they're different?

    We have both jellies and jams in America. Obviously some of us think
    they go well together with peanut butter. And don't be offended by
    people who may think you're a troll and not just here asking stupid
    questions.

    -sw

  12. #12
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich


    On 5-Jul-2012, "DavidW" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > AFAIK this sandwich doesn't exist at all here in Australia. I've never
    > heard of
    > anyone here eating it, yet I get the impression that it's very common in
    > the
    > U.S. I have heard that what Americans call jelly is more like what we
    > would call
    > jam. Is that true? (If so, what do Americans call what we call jelly?)
    > Either
    > way, it seems like a very odd combination of spreads to me. Do they really
    > go
    > together well?


    Pb and j is a common sandwich in the US, often found in "bag" lunches taken
    to school or work because it requires no refrigeration and is tasty.

    Jelly, jam and preserves are three ways fruit has traditionally had its
    useful life extended. The best explanation of the difference I've seen on
    the web is at:
    http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-...-preserves.htm
    At its simplest, the difference is jelly is made from fruit juice while jam
    and preserves are made from the fruit, pureed or in chunks respectively.

    Since I've not encountered what you call jelly, I can't comment on which of
    our fruit spreads it best matches; however, the referenced website can
    likely help you answer the question.
    --

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  13. #13
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    On 7/5/2012 6:57 PM, DavidW wrote:
    > AFAIK this sandwich doesn't exist at all here in Australia. I've never heard of
    > anyone here eating it, yet I get the impression that it's very common in the
    > U.S. I have heard that what Americans call jelly is more like what we would call
    > jam. Is that true? (If so, what do Americans call what we call jelly?) Either
    > way, it seems like a very odd combination of spreads to me. Do they really go
    > together well?


    I like a nice peanut butter and strawberry preserves sandwich
    once in a while, I think they go together great.

    Do you call gelatin (Jello) Jelly? Because that's not what
    is meant by jelly in the US.

    nancy

  14. #14
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich


    "DavidW" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jt5bc1$ej1$[email protected]..
    > ...........
    > But my point was that they have different meanings in different countries,
    > and a dictionary is not likely to give the sort of information I'll get
    > here. Why not just cancel the newsgroup altogether and everyone can get
    > what they need cooking-wise from dictionaries, encyclopedias and recipe
    > books?
    > ...........


    Well said. I've heard that people like either Vegemite or peanut butter
    but not both. I like both; Vegemite on breakfast toast and peanut
    butter any other time, preferably on a buttery cracker (Ritz, here in US)
    with some butter and honey. Jam and jelly tend to be interchangeable
    except in recipes which call for a clear jelly (red currant to be melted
    into a sauce for Goose, i.e.) specific to the clear substance. Jelly
    is by far the predominant descriptor and these days applies to either
    form of crushed, coagualted fruit. It would be a bit pretentious to ask
    for jam with the breakfast toast. Marmalade, of course, follows its
    own rules of conduct. This is subject to numerous objections,
    demurrers and criticisms, not to mention local taste variants.

    pavane




  15. #15
    Tom Biasi Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    On 7/5/2012 6:57 PM, DavidW wrote:
    > AFAIK this sandwich doesn't exist at all here in Australia. I've never heard of
    > anyone here eating it, yet I get the impression that it's very common in the
    > U.S. I have heard that what Americans call jelly is more like what we would call
    > jam. Is that true? (If so, what do Americans call what we call jelly?) Either
    > way, it seems like a very odd combination of spreads to me. Do they really go
    > together well?
    >
    >

    I just love the culture wars.
    What would you think of pickles and peanut butter?
    Has to be kosher dills.
    I like whole wheat toast with mine.

    Tom


  16. #16
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    On Fri, 6 Jul 2012 10:02:07 +1000, "DavidW" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >John Kuthe wrote:
    >> On Fri, 6 Jul 2012 08:57:48 +1000, "DavidW" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> Yeah, but you Aussies eat Vegemite, which has to be the vilest
    >> substance anyone ever called food! ;-)

    >
    >I regularly have butter and Vegemite on toast. Yum!
    >


    Yep, like I said!!

    I had some Australian housemates years ago and one left me a jar of
    Vegemite which sat in my cupboard forever until my son asked me what
    it was. So I told him and he wanted to try it. So we opened it and he
    took a taste and was like YUCK! And I told him "That's why I never
    opened it!"

    I threw it in the garbage then.

    John Kuthe...

  17. #17
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich


    "Nancy Young" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4ff63bdf$0$28669$[email protected] .com...
    > On 7/5/2012 6:57 PM, DavidW wrote:
    >> AFAIK this sandwich doesn't exist at all here in Australia. I've never
    >> heard of
    >> anyone here eating it, yet I get the impression that it's very common in
    >> the
    >> U.S. I have heard that what Americans call jelly is more like what we
    >> would call
    >> jam. Is that true? (If so, what do Americans call what we call jelly?)
    >> Either
    >> way, it seems like a very odd combination of spreads to me. Do they
    >> really go
    >> together well?

    >
    > I like a nice peanut butter and strawberry preserves sandwich
    > once in a while, I think they go together great.
    >
    > Do you call gelatin (Jello) Jelly? Because that's not what
    > is meant by jelly in the US.


    Excellent point, Nancy. Since "jelly" in the Brit-speak is what
    we call Jello, they cannot use the term for strained fruit goody.
    Hence ''jam" or "preserves" where we would say "jelly." My
    vague recollection from the years in Canada is that jam is
    more the breakfast fruit stuff; preserves a more manipulated
    condiment served often with meats, sort of chutney-like.

    pavane



  18. #18
    gloria p Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    On 7/5/2012 4:57 PM, DavidW wrote:
    > AFAIK this sandwich doesn't exist at all here in Australia. I've never heard of
    > anyone here eating it, yet I get the impression that it's very common in the
    > U.S. I have heard that what Americans call jelly is more like what we would call
    > jam. Is that true? (If so, what do Americans call what we call jelly?) Either
    > way, it seems like a very odd combination of spreads to me. Do they really go
    > together well?
    >
    >



    Peanut butter (salty) does go well with jam/jelly/preserves (sweet.)

    Jam/preserves = fruit and sugar cooked together with some fruit texture
    remaining

    Jelly = juice extracted from fruit cooked with sugar, smooth texture

    Australian jelly = Jello in the U.S. (gelatin used as a dessert or in
    some places, salad)

    gloria p


  19. #19
    DavidW Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    John Kuthe wrote:
    > On Fri, 6 Jul 2012 10:02:07 +1000, "DavidW" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> I regularly have butter and Vegemite on toast. Yum!

    >
    > Yep, like I said!!
    >
    > I had some Australian housemates years ago and one left me a jar of
    > Vegemite which sat in my cupboard forever until my son asked me what
    > it was. So I told him and he wanted to try it. So we opened it and he
    > took a taste and was like YUCK! And I told him "That's why I never
    > opened it!"
    >
    > I threw it in the garbage then.


    There is a belief here, whether true or not, that Americans don't like it
    because they use far too much (i.e. spread it on like peanut butter). You are
    also not likely to like it straight out of the jar, if that's what you did. I
    don't think you could tell what it's like with butter on toast by tasting it on
    its own. You should have got your housemates to make you a slice before they
    left.



  20. #20
    A Moose in Love Guest

    Default Re: Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

    On Jul 5, 9:27*pm, John Kuthe <JohnKu...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Fri, 6 Jul 2012 10:02:07 +1000, "DavidW" <n...@email.provided> wrote:
    > >John Kuthe wrote:
    > >> On Fri, 6 Jul 2012 08:57:48 +1000, "DavidW" <n...@email.provided> wrote:

    >
    > >> Yeah, but you Aussies eat Vegemite, which has to be the vilest
    > >> substance anyone ever called food! ;-)

    >
    > >I regularly have butter and Vegemite on toast. Yum!

    >
    > Yep, like I said!!
    >
    > I had some Australian housemates years ago and one left me a jar of
    > Vegemite which sat in my cupboard forever until my son asked me what
    > it was. So I told him and he wanted to try it. So we opened it and he
    > took a taste and was like YUCK! And I told him "That's why I never
    > opened it!"
    >
    > I threw it in the garbage then.
    >
    > John Kuthe...


    I just threw out a bottle of Mescal that I bought in Mazatlan in the
    late '70's. I could never get into it seeing that worm in the
    bottle.

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