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Thread: Peach cobbler - question

  1. #1
    Lenona Guest

    Default Peach cobbler - question

    Easiest dessert I've ever found.

    However, I found that even 1.5 cups of sugar is a bit much - in fact,
    I was thinking of cutting it in half, since the sugar was practically
    all I could taste. (I'm very glad I didn't bother buying ice cream!)
    Granted, the recipe calls for yellow peaches and I only had white ones
    available. I was also thinking of using brown sugar in either the
    crust or the peaches - can anyone tell me if this would be an
    improvement by most people's standards? Also, maybe I'll use 50% wheat
    flour next time - again, for the sake of flavor.

    Has anyone tried these variations already? Your results? Thanks.

    Lenona.

    http://www.asweetpeachef.com/sweets/...peach-cobbler/

    Fresh Peach Cobbler
    recipe adapted from Southern Living, June 1997

    1/2 cup unsalted butter
    1 cup all-purpose flour
    1 1/2 cups sugar, divided into 3/4 cup each
    1 tbsp. baking powder
    1/4 tsp. kosher salt
    1 cup milk
    4 cups (about 4 large) fresh yellow peaches, cut into slices
    1 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
    1/4 tsp. lemon zest
    1/4 tsp. cinnamon
    1/8 tsp. nutmeg

    Directions
    Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

    Melt butter in a LARGE baking dish or dutch oven.

    Combine flour, 3/4 cup sugar, baking powder and kosher salt in a
    medium bowl. Add milk and stir just until dry ingredients are
    incorporated. Without stirring, pour batter over melted butter.

    Heat remaining 3/4 cup sugar, fresh peach slices, lemon juice, lemon
    zest, cinnamon and nutmeg over medium-high heat, stirring constantly.
    Cook until sugar has melted and all ingredients are fully mixed.
    Without stirring, pour the peach mixture over the batter. Don’t worry:
    the crust will form over the peaches during baking. Sprinkle cobbler
    crust with additional cinnamon or nutmeg, if desired.

    Bake cobbler for 40-45 minutes or until golden brown. Serve cobbler
    along with Homemade Vanilla Ice Cream, if desired.

    (end)

  2. #2
    ItsJoanNotJoann Guest

    Default Re: Peach cobbler - question

    On Aug 15, 6:58*pm, Lenona <lenona...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >Easiest dessert I've ever found.
    >
    > However, I found that even 1.5 cups of sugar is a bit much - in fact,
    > I was thinking of cutting it in half, since the sugar was practically
    > all I could taste. Also, maybe I'll use 50% wheat
    > flour next time - again, for the sake of flavor.
    >
    > Has anyone tried these variations already? Your results? Thanks.
    >
    > Lenona.
    >
    >

    Am I wrong but is not the recommendation substitution 1/4 cup of whole
    wheat flour and not 50/50?


  3. #3
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Peach cobbler - question

    rLenona <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Easiest dessert I've ever found.
    >
    >However, I found that even 1.5 cups of sugar is a bit much - in fact,
    >I was thinking of cutting it in half, since the sugar was practically
    >all I could taste. (I'm very glad I didn't bother buying ice cream!)
    >Granted, the recipe calls for yellow peaches and I only had white ones
    >available.


    I use a bit *more* sugar in a similar recipe. If I ended up with
    Very ripe peaches [which I don't because I pick them a day or two
    early so the squirrel isn't tempted] I might adjust down to 1 1/2
    cups.

    Did your peaches fill the kitchen with peach smell as you were peeling
    them? If not, I'd suspect the peaches were just picked too early &
    didn't have the flavor. I don't think using less sugar will help.
    Get your peaches from as close to the source as you can- backyard,
    orchard, farmers market.

    >I was also thinking of using brown sugar in either the
    >crust or the peaches - can anyone tell me if this would be an
    >improvement by most people's standards? Also, maybe I'll use 50% wheat
    >flour next time - again, for the sake of flavor.


    I like brown sugar- Seems like I've had a caramel-ly cobbler
    somewhere along the line. I guess I just like cobbler just the way
    it is-- a simple way to serve peaches with a little dough to hold the
    juice and cream.

    Jim

  4. #4
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Re: Peach cobbler - question


    "Jim Elbrecht" > I like brown sugar- Seems like I've had a caramel-ly
    cobbler
    > somewhere along the line. I guess I just like cobbler just the way
    > it is-- a simple way to serve peaches with a little dough to hold the
    > juice and cream.
    >
    > Jim


    When I discovered that there are no Food Police, I began to substitute brown
    sugar frequently. I like the caramel-ly flavor too and think it would be
    really good with peaches. The peaches in our local markets don't pass the
    sniff test and probably have all the flavor of a pack of copy paper; maybe
    less. Canned peaches, sadly, are better. Polly


  5. #5
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Peach cobbler - question

    On Tue, 16 Aug 2011 08:37:55 -0500, "Polly Esther"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Jim Elbrecht" > I like brown sugar- Seems like I've had a caramel-ly
    >cobbler
    >> somewhere along the line. I guess I just like cobbler just the way
    >> it is-- a simple way to serve peaches with a little dough to hold the
    >> juice and cream.
    >>
    >> Jim

    >
    >When I discovered that there are no Food Police, I began to substitute brown
    >sugar frequently. I like the caramel-ly flavor too and think it would be
    >really good with peaches. The peaches in our local markets don't pass the
    >sniff test and probably have all the flavor of a pack of copy paper; maybe
    >less. Canned peaches, sadly, are better. Polly


    Ours too. When my peach tree runs out [maybe today], I'm thinking
    about going to a pick your own orchard just to try some other
    varieties.

    Otherwise- it is canned or frozen for me. Same with tomatoes- green
    beans- and usually broccoli & cauliflower.

    It is nice to be able to *see* all that pretty produce-- but it would
    be nicer if it wasn't just plastic-y representations of the real
    thing.

    Jim

  6. #6
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Peach cobbler - question


    "Lenona" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    Easiest dessert I've ever found.

    However, I found that even 1.5 cups of sugar is a bit much - in fact,
    I was thinking of cutting it in half, since the sugar was practically
    all I could taste. (I'm very glad I didn't bother buying ice cream!)
    Granted, the recipe calls for yellow peaches and I only had white ones
    available. I was also thinking of using brown sugar in either the
    crust or the peaches - can anyone tell me if this would be an
    improvement by most people's standards? Also, maybe I'll use 50% wheat
    flour next time - again, for the sake of flavor.

    Has anyone tried these variations already? Your results? Thanks.

    -----

    Yes. When I made cobblers and any other fruit pies as well as jams and
    jellies I would usually use 1/4 or even less sugar than called for in the
    recipe. You want to taste the fruit and fruit is plenty sweet. I've seen
    pies call for 2 cups of sugar which is just ridiculous. If I were to make
    your recipe I'd use 1/2 cup sugar at the most assuming I had ripe fruit. I
    also used brown sugar in peach cobblers and it works quite well. It adds
    flavor and not just sweetness. I just may bake a cobbler again now that I
    thin about it. Being diabetic I can't tolerate sugar so I'd probably
    eliminate it altogether. And I suspect the results would be quite pleasing.

    Paul



  7. #7
    Cindy Fuller Guest

    Default Re: Peach cobbler - question

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Lenona <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Easiest dessert I've ever found.
    >
    > However, I found that even 1.5 cups of sugar is a bit much - in fact,
    > I was thinking of cutting it in half, since the sugar was practically
    > all I could taste. (I'm very glad I didn't bother buying ice cream!)
    > Granted, the recipe calls for yellow peaches and I only had white ones
    > available. I was also thinking of using brown sugar in either the
    > crust or the peaches - can anyone tell me if this would be an
    > improvement by most people's standards? Also, maybe I'll use 50% wheat
    > flour next time - again, for the sake of flavor.
    >
    > Has anyone tried these variations already? Your results? Thanks.
    >
    > Lenona.
    >
    > http://www.asweetpeachef.com/sweets/...peach-cobbler/
    >
    > Fresh Peach Cobbler
    > recipe adapted from Southern Living, June 1997
    >
    > 1/2 cup unsalted butter
    > 1 cup all-purpose flour
    > 1 1/2 cups sugar, divided into 3/4 cup each
    > 1 tbsp. baking powder
    > 1/4 tsp. kosher salt
    > 1 cup milk
    > 4 cups (about 4 large) fresh yellow peaches, cut into slices
    > 1 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
    > 1/4 tsp. lemon zest
    > 1/4 tsp. cinnamon
    > 1/8 tsp. nutmeg
    >
    > Directions
    > Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
    >
    > Melt butter in a LARGE baking dish or dutch oven.
    >
    > Combine flour, 3/4 cup sugar, baking powder and kosher salt in a
    > medium bowl. Add milk and stir just until dry ingredients are
    > incorporated. Without stirring, pour batter over melted butter.
    >
    > Heat remaining 3/4 cup sugar, fresh peach slices, lemon juice, lemon
    > zest, cinnamon and nutmeg over medium-high heat, stirring constantly.
    > Cook until sugar has melted and all ingredients are fully mixed.
    > Without stirring, pour the peach mixture over the batter. Don¹t worry:
    > the crust will form over the peaches during baking. Sprinkle cobbler
    > crust with additional cinnamon or nutmeg, if desired.
    >
    > Bake cobbler for 40-45 minutes or until golden brown. Serve cobbler
    > along with Homemade Vanilla Ice Cream, if desired.
    >
    > (end)


    The main adaptation from the original ONE TRUE COBBLER® recipe is in the
    amount of sugar. The original recipe calls for a total of 2 cups.
    Other modifications are the additions of lemon zest, cinnamon, and
    nutmeg. I have made this recipe with 1/2 whole wheat flour and it comes
    out well. I don't think the substitution of brown sugar for white would
    make much of a difference.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me

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