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Thread: Pare or grate orange rind

  1. #1
    Doug Weller Guest

    Default Pare or grate orange rind

    I've got a recipe for venison stew that says pare the orange rind and cut
    into strips. What would be the difference if I just grated it (besides the
    obvious, that I wouldn't have strips to add a bit of texture).
    Thanks
    Doug
    --
    Doug Weller --
    A Director and Moderator of The Hall of Ma'at http://www.hallofmaat.com
    Doug's Archaeology Site: http://www.ramtops.co.uk
    Amun - co-owner/co-moderator http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Amun/


  2. #2
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Pare or grate orange rind

    On Tue 07 Dec 2010 12:57:37p, Doug Weller told us...

    > I've got a recipe for venison stew that says pare the orange rind
    > and cut into strips. What would be the difference if I just grated
    > it (besides the obvious, that I wouldn't have strips to add a bit
    > of texture). Thanks
    > Doug


    In some recipes that call for strips of orange rind, it is intended
    that they be removed before serving as they have already given up their
    flavor to the dish.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  3. #3
    SpaghettiWestern Guest

    Default Re: Pare or grate orange rind

    On Dec 7, 7:57*pm, Doug Weller <dwel...@ramtops.removethis.co.uk>
    wrote:
    > I've got a recipe for venison stew that says pare the orange rind and cut
    > into strips. What would be the difference if I just grated it (besides the
    > obvious, that I wouldn't have strips to add a bit of texture).


    Just shut up and make venison stew. Or don't you know how?

    > Thanks
    > Doug
    > --
    > Doug Weller --
    > A Director and Moderator of The Hall of Ma'athttp://www.hallofmaat.com
    > Doug's Archaeology Site:http://www.ramtops.co.uk
    > Amun - co-owner/co-moderatorhttp://groups.yahoo.com/group/Amun/



  4. #4
    blacksalt Guest

    Default Re: Pare or grate orange rind

    Doug Weller wrote:
    > I've got a recipe for venison stew that says pare the orange rind and cut
    > into strips. What would be the difference if I just grated it (besides the
    > obvious, that I wouldn't have strips to add a bit of texture).
    > Thanks
    > Doug



    You might not want to end up with little bits of it in your teeth. A
    pared strip could be fished out, or pushed aside by a fork. HTH.
    blacksalt

  5. #5
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Pare or grate orange rind

    On 07 Dec 2010 20:45:45 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue 07 Dec 2010 12:57:37p, Doug Weller told us...
    >
    >> I've got a recipe for venison stew that says pare the orange rind
    >> and cut into strips. What would be the difference if I just grated
    >> it (besides the obvious, that I wouldn't have strips to add a bit
    >> of texture). Thanks
    >> Doug

    >
    >In some recipes that call for strips of orange rind, it is intended
    >that they be removed before serving as they have already given up their
    >flavor to the dish.


    Right in one.

    While one might put orange zest (microplaned) into a pound cake, the
    orange peel (think lemon twist in a martini) adds color to the
    presentation when used in stews, but it is not really intended to be
    eaten.

    Alex

  6. #6
    Doug Weller Guest

    Default Re: Pare or grate orange rind

    On Wed, 08 Dec 2010 15:17:49 -0600, in rec.food.cooking, Chemiker wrote:

    >On 07 Dec 2010 20:45:45 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Tue 07 Dec 2010 12:57:37p, Doug Weller told us...
    >>
    >>> I've got a recipe for venison stew that says pare the orange rind
    >>> and cut into strips. What would be the difference if I just grated
    >>> it (besides the obvious, that I wouldn't have strips to add a bit
    >>> of texture). Thanks
    >>> Doug

    >>
    >>In some recipes that call for strips of orange rind, it is intended
    >>that they be removed before serving as they have already given up their
    >>flavor to the dish.

    >
    >Right in one.
    >
    >While one might put orange zest (microplaned) into a pound cake, the
    >orange peel (think lemon twist in a martini) adds color to the
    >presentation when used in stews, but it is not really intended to be
    >eaten.
    >


    True, but in thin strips in the venison stew I made, they added to color
    and taste. Orange juice, brandy and venison (haunch), not what I would
    have thought of myself but delicious.

    Doug
    --
    Doug Weller --
    A Director and Moderator of The Hall of Ma'at http://www.hallofmaat.com
    Doug's Archaeology Site: http://www.ramtops.co.uk
    Amun - co-owner/co-moderator http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Amun/


  7. #7
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Pare or grate orange rind

    On Thu 09 Dec 2010 03:20:13a, Doug Weller told us...

    > On Wed, 08 Dec 2010 15:17:49 -0600, in rec.food.cooking, Chemiker
    > wrote:
    >
    >>On 07 Dec 2010 20:45:45 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    >><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Tue 07 Dec 2010 12:57:37p, Doug Weller told us...
    >>>
    >>>> I've got a recipe for venison stew that says pare the orange
    >>>> rind and cut into strips. What would be the difference if I
    >>>> just grated it (besides the obvious, that I wouldn't have
    >>>> strips to add a bit of texture). Thanks
    >>>> Doug
    >>>
    >>>In some recipes that call for strips of orange rind, it is
    >>>intended that they be removed before serving as they have already
    >>>given up their flavor to the dish.

    >>
    >>Right in one.
    >>
    >>While one might put orange zest (microplaned) into a pound cake,
    >>the orange peel (think lemon twist in a martini) adds color to the
    >>presentation when used in stews, but it is not really intended to
    >>be eaten.
    >>

    >
    > True, but in thin strips in the venison stew I made, they added to
    > color and taste. Orange juice, brandy and venison (haunch), not
    > what I would have thought of myself but delicious.
    >
    > Doug


    There's no reason *not* to leave it in. It certainly would add some
    color, and perhaps a bit of desirable bitterness if eaten. I don't
    think the flavor would be that different if grated, but you'd lose
    the visual effect.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  8. #8
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Pare or grate orange rind

    On Thu, 09 Dec 2010 10:20:13 +0000, Doug Weller
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Wed, 08 Dec 2010 15:17:49 -0600, in rec.food.cooking, Chemiker wrote:
    >
    >>On 07 Dec 2010 20:45:45 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    >><[email protected]> wrote:


    >>While one might put orange zest (microplaned) into a pound cake, the
    >>orange peel (think lemon twist in a martini) adds color to the
    >>presentation when used in stews, but it is not really intended to be
    >>eaten.
    >>

    >
    >True, but in thin strips in the venison stew I made, they added to color
    >and taste. Orange juice, brandy and venison (haunch), not what I would
    >have thought of myself but delicious.


    "Thin strips" are an intermediate case, I guess. 1/4" strips would be
    a bit much, but, like you, I sometimes make a sauce-espagnole type
    thing for beef, with a tablespoon of concentrated OJ and a tbs of thin
    orange zest strips (like 1 mm), and everybody eats the orange.

    Alex

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