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Thread: Oven Thermometer Accuracy

  1. #1
    Geoff Lane Guest

    Default Oven Thermometer Accuracy

    About a year back I purchased a Heston Blumenthal badged Salter oven
    thermometer.

    My fan assisted oven does appear to switch on and off a few times before
    appearing to settle at the correct temperature.

    Recently I purchased a Lakeland own brand oven thermometer for a
    relative and decided to check against mine, it reacted to temperature a
    lot quicker than the salter and read around 10c more.

    I am only a personal cook, casseroles, bread rolls, pasties and other
    pastry types and haven't experienced any obvious problem but any
    suggestions as to confirming accuracy of gauge.

    Geoff Lane

  2. #2
    Krypsis Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy

    On 31/03/2012 9:25 PM, Geoff Lane wrote:
    > About a year back I purchased a Heston Blumenthal badged Salter oven
    > thermometer.
    >
    > My fan assisted oven does appear to switch on and off a few times before
    > appearing to settle at the correct temperature.
    >
    > Recently I purchased a Lakeland own brand oven thermometer for a
    > relative and decided to check against mine, it reacted to temperature a
    > lot quicker than the salter and read around 10c more.
    >
    > I am only a personal cook, casseroles, bread rolls, pasties and other
    > pastry types and haven't experienced any obvious problem but any
    > suggestions as to confirming accuracy of gauge.
    >
    > Geoff Lane


    First point; Which guage is your reference point? You have calibrated
    neither of your two thermometers against a known accurate reference
    thermometer so any comparisons between the two are specious at best. If
    you seriously want to check accuracy, then you need to invest in a very
    high quality reference unit. At the cost of those, I doubt you will bother.

    Second point; How critical is the temperature of any oven during cooking
    of general foodstuffs in the home? We have a gas oven and I'll guarantee
    the numbers on the dial are only a very general guide. The oven temp
    will probably vary from day to day anyway. A professional chef may
    require a greater degree of accuracy but I would suspect that they would
    become very familiar with their ovens. This familiarity would enable
    them to judge temperature through experience and possibly with no
    reference to a thermometer at all.

    --

    Krypsis

  3. #3
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy


    "Krypsis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jl6v69$m5l$[email protected]..
    > On 31/03/2012 9:25 PM, Geoff Lane wrote:
    >> About a year back I purchased a Heston Blumenthal badged Salter oven
    >> thermometer.
    >>
    >> My fan assisted oven does appear to switch on and off a few times before
    >> appearing to settle at the correct temperature.
    >>
    >> Recently I purchased a Lakeland own brand oven thermometer for a
    >> relative and decided to check against mine, it reacted to temperature a
    >> lot quicker than the salter and read around 10c more.
    >>
    >> I am only a personal cook, casseroles, bread rolls, pasties and other
    >> pastry types and haven't experienced any obvious problem but any
    >> suggestions as to confirming accuracy of gauge.
    >>
    >> Geoff Lane

    >
    > First point; Which guage is your reference point? You have calibrated
    > neither of your two thermometers against a known accurate reference
    > thermometer so any comparisons between the two are specious at best.

    (snippage)


    Specious, and totally unnecessary (IMHO). If his personal use isn't
    affected, why is he worried about how two thermometers compare? I don't
    have an oven thermometer. I know my (electric) oven well enough to know its
    quirks. I know when to raise or lower the temp, or adjust the length of
    cooking time, depending upon what I'm cooking. I use a meat thermometer for
    some roasts (like prime rib). To me, unless you have a really unreliable
    oven or aren't familiar with it, an oven thermometer is just another gadget.
    I've gotten along just fine without one all these years.

    Jill


  4. #4
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy

    In article <[email protected]>, j_mcquown@comcast.net
    says...
    >
    > "Krypsis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:jl6v69$m5l$[email protected]..
    > > On 31/03/2012 9:25 PM, Geoff Lane wrote:
    > >> About a year back I purchased a Heston Blumenthal badged Salter oven
    > >> thermometer.
    > >>
    > >> My fan assisted oven does appear to switch on and off a few times before
    > >> appearing to settle at the correct temperature.
    > >>
    > >> Recently I purchased a Lakeland own brand oven thermometer for a
    > >> relative and decided to check against mine, it reacted to temperature a
    > >> lot quicker than the salter and read around 10c more.
    > >>
    > >> I am only a personal cook, casseroles, bread rolls, pasties and other
    > >> pastry types and haven't experienced any obvious problem but any
    > >> suggestions as to confirming accuracy of gauge.
    > >>
    > >> Geoff Lane

    > >
    > > First point; Which guage is your reference point? You have calibrated
    > > neither of your two thermometers against a known accurate reference
    > > thermometer so any comparisons between the two are specious at best.

    > (snippage)
    >
    >
    > Specious, and totally unnecessary (IMHO). If his personal use isn't
    > affected, why is he worried about how two thermometers compare? I don't
    > have an oven thermometer. I know my (electric) oven well enough to know its
    > quirks. I know when to raise or lower the temp, or adjust the length of
    > cooking time, depending upon what I'm cooking.


    agreed

    I use a meat thermometer for
    > some roasts (like prime rib). To me, unless you have a really unreliable
    > oven or aren't familiar with it, an oven thermometer is just another gadget.
    > I've gotten along just fine without one all these years.


    Years ago I suspected the thermostat on one of my (electric) ovens had
    gone haywire. I borrowed an oven thermometer which proved it. It also
    proved the replacement thermostat was accurate. Otherwise I've no use for
    one.

    Janet

  5. #5
    Bull Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy

    In article <jl6pim$g1g$[email protected]>,
    Geoff Lane <[email protected]> wrote:

    > About a year back I purchased a Heston Blumenthal badged Salter oven
    > thermometer.
    >
    > My fan assisted oven does appear to switch on and off a few times before
    > appearing to settle at the correct temperature.
    >
    > Recently I purchased a Lakeland own brand oven thermometer for a
    > relative and decided to check against mine, it reacted to temperature a
    > lot quicker than the salter and read around 10c more.
    >
    > I am only a personal cook, casseroles, bread rolls, pasties and other
    > pastry types and haven't experienced any obvious problem but any
    > suggestions as to confirming accuracy of gauge.
    >
    > Geoff Lane


    With the two you have, obviously one or both are wrong. I don't have
    one and never have. I use a Polder digital style thermometer for doing
    turkeys, hams and roasts. If your baking is working just keep doing what
    your doing and don't fret about the precise temperature.

    You could buy a half dozen and see if you get a cluster of agreement.
    Take the ones you don't like back (:

    I bought a cheap outside thermometer recently and noticed that many on
    the rack all had different temps. I found a majority agreement and
    bought one of those. (same scientifc principle)

    BULL

  6. #6
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy


    "Janet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    > says...
    >>
    >> "Krypsis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:jl6v69$m5l$[email protected]..
    >> > On 31/03/2012 9:25 PM, Geoff Lane wrote:
    >> >> About a year back I purchased a Heston Blumenthal badged Salter oven
    >> >> thermometer.
    >> >>
    >> >> My fan assisted oven does appear to switch on and off a few times
    >> >> before
    >> >> appearing to settle at the correct temperature.
    >> >>
    >> >> Recently I purchased a Lakeland own brand oven thermometer for a
    >> >> relative and decided to check against mine, it reacted to temperature
    >> >> a
    >> >> lot quicker than the salter and read around 10c more.
    >> >>
    >> >> I am only a personal cook, casseroles, bread rolls, pasties and other
    >> >> pastry types and haven't experienced any obvious problem but any
    >> >> suggestions as to confirming accuracy of gauge.
    >> >>
    >> >> Geoff Lane
    >> >
    >> > First point; Which guage is your reference point? You have calibrated
    >> > neither of your two thermometers against a known accurate reference
    >> > thermometer so any comparisons between the two are specious at best.

    >> (snippage)
    >>
    >>
    >> Specious, and totally unnecessary (IMHO). If his personal use isn't
    >> affected, why is he worried about how two thermometers compare? I don't
    >> have an oven thermometer. I know my (electric) oven well enough to know
    >> its
    >> quirks. I know when to raise or lower the temp, or adjust the length of
    >> cooking time, depending upon what I'm cooking.

    >
    > agreed
    >
    > I use a meat thermometer for
    >> some roasts (like prime rib). To me, unless you have a really unreliable
    >> oven or aren't familiar with it, an oven thermometer is just another
    >> gadget.
    >> I've gotten along just fine without one all these years.

    >
    > Years ago I suspected the thermostat on one of my (electric) ovens had
    > gone haywire. I borrowed an oven thermometer which proved it. It also
    > proved the replacement thermostat was accurate. Otherwise I've no use for
    > one.
    >
    > Janet



    Also agreed. I had an element on my oven replaced last year. If you use
    your oven at all, you can tell when it's not working properly. The oven
    thermostat was also replaced. (Fortunately, I have a home warranty which
    covers repair or replacement of even appliances as old as mine - 1987.)

    I remember my great aunt Ada still cooking over a wood stove in the early
    1980's. Her "thermometer" was her hand held over the fire She baked
    fantastic pies. I remember she grew rhubarb out back in the kitchen garden.
    She baked bread. Just like in the old days.

    Jill


  7. #7
    Krypsis Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy

    On 1/04/2012 1:13 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > "Janet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    >> says...
    >>>

    <snip>

    >
    > Also agreed. I had an element on my oven replaced last year. If you use
    > your oven at all, you can tell when it's not working properly. The oven
    > thermostat was also replaced. (Fortunately, I have a home warranty which
    > covers repair or replacement of even appliances as old as mine - 1987.)
    >
    > I remember my great aunt Ada still cooking over a wood stove in the


    I grew up with one of those, a big green monster. Heated the hot water too.

    > early 1980's. Her "thermometer" was her hand held over the fire She
    > baked fantastic pies. I remember she grew rhubarb out back in the


    We still have rhubarb out in the back garden. My wife has no idea what
    to do with it so it sits there unused for the most part except when a
    neighbour or friend wants some. I remember rhubarb as a dessert when I
    was a kid ... very sweet. It had a lot of sugar added!

    > kitchen garden. She baked bread. Just like in the old days.
    >
    > Jill



    --

    Krypsis

  8. #8
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy

    In article <jl74fm$jkt$[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > On 1/04/2012 1:13 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    > >
    > > "Janet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]..
    > >> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    > >> says...
    > >>>

    > <snip>
    >
    > >
    > > Also agreed. I had an element on my oven replaced last year. If you use
    > > your oven at all, you can tell when it's not working properly. The oven
    > > thermostat was also replaced. (Fortunately, I have a home warranty which
    > > covers repair or replacement of even appliances as old as mine - 1987.)
    > >
    > > I remember my great aunt Ada still cooking over a wood stove in the

    >
    > I grew up with one of those, a big green monster. Heated the hot water too.
    >
    > > early 1980's. Her "thermometer" was her hand held over the fire She
    > > baked fantastic pies. I remember she grew rhubarb out back in the

    >
    > We still have rhubarb out in the back garden. My wife has no idea what
    > to do with it so it sits there unused for the most part except when a
    > neighbour or friend wants some. I remember rhubarb as a dessert when I
    > was a kid ... very sweet. It had a lot of sugar added!


    We have it in the back garden and just had some at lunch (Eve's pudding
    with custard). I gave a bagful to a neighbour who has just given me some
    of the rhubarb and ginger jam she made with it. I also make rhubarb pie;
    and a cold dessert which kids adore. Stew some rhubarb in its own juice
    wit a little sugar, add a raspberry jelly block, stir until its melted
    then let go cold and set.

    Janet.

  9. #9
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...

    > I remember my great aunt Ada still cooking over a wood stove in the early
    > 1980's. Her "thermometer" was her hand held over the fire She baked
    > fantastic pies. I remember she grew rhubarb out back in the kitchen garden.
    > She baked bread. Just like in the old days.


    We grow rhubarb, make fantastic pies and bake bread (in the oven, not a
    machine) . "Just like the old days" indeed!

    Janet


  10. #10
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy


    "Krypsis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jl74fm$jkt$[email protected]..
    > On 1/04/2012 1:13 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >>
    >> "Janet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    >>> says...
    >>>>

    > <snip>
    >
    >> I remember my great aunt Ada still cooking over a wood stove in the

    >
    > I grew up with one of those, a big green monster. Heated the hot water
    > too.
    >

    This was an old black stove. Looked like it came out an episode of 'The
    Waltons' And yes, it had a well for keeping water hot. Hot water was
    necessary for making gravies, mashed potatoes, boiling vegetables picked
    from the garden.

    >> early 1980's. Her "thermometer" was her hand held over the fire She
    >> baked fantastic pies. I remember she grew rhubarb out back in the

    >
    > We still have rhubarb out in the back garden. My wife has no idea what to
    > do with it so it sits there unused for the most part except when a
    > neighbour or friend wants some. I remember rhubarb as a dessert when I was
    > a kid ... very sweet. It had a lot of sugar added!
    >

    There have been lots of recipes dealing with rhubarb here. Some quite
    recent. Some involve strawberries.

    Jill


  11. #11
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy

    On Sat, 31 Mar 2012 09:35:02 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Krypsis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:jl6v69$m5l$[email protected]..
    >> On 31/03/2012 9:25 PM, Geoff Lane wrote:
    >>> About a year back I purchased a Heston Blumenthal badged Salter oven
    >>> thermometer.
    >>>
    >>> My fan assisted oven does appear to switch on and off a few times before
    >>> appearing to settle at the correct temperature.
    >>>
    >>> Recently I purchased a Lakeland own brand oven thermometer for a
    >>> relative and decided to check against mine, it reacted to temperature a
    >>> lot quicker than the salter and read around 10c more.
    >>>
    >>> I am only a personal cook, casseroles, bread rolls, pasties and other
    >>> pastry types and haven't experienced any obvious problem but any
    >>> suggestions as to confirming accuracy of gauge.
    >>>
    >>> Geoff Lane

    >>
    >> First point; Which guage is your reference point? You have calibrated
    >> neither of your two thermometers against a known accurate reference
    >> thermometer so any comparisons between the two are specious at best.

    >(snippage)
    >
    >
    >Specious, and totally unnecessary (IMHO). If his personal use isn't
    >affected, why is he worried about how two thermometers compare? I don't
    >have an oven thermometer. I know my (electric) oven well enough to know its
    >quirks. I know when to raise or lower the temp, or adjust the length of
    >cooking time, depending upon what I'm cooking. I use a meat thermometer for
    >some roasts (like prime rib). To me, unless you have a really unreliable
    >oven or aren't familiar with it, an oven thermometer is just another gadget.
    >I've gotten along just fine without one all these years.
    >
    >Jill


    I own two cheapo oven thermometers but don't use them. I rely on the
    stove's digital readout and my ability to bake a frozen pizza to my
    liking. Oven temperature varies by shelf position anyway, even with
    convection ovens temperature varies by position. If an oven's center
    position is off by +/- 10 F. it's considerd dead on for culinary
    purposes... at 350F. that's considered a 3% error... I can't think of
    anything one cooks that requires greater accuracy...3% error is
    sufficient for most metalurgy lab work. There are glass oven doors
    for a reason, and most cake recipes say to test for doneness with a
    scientific instrument called a toothpic, and everyones concept of
    "golden brown" is different. Oven temperature accuracy for baking a
    cake is no more critical than fry pan temperature accuracy for a
    grilled cheese.

  12. #12
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy

    On Sat, 31 Mar 2012 11:25:06 +0100, Geoff Lane
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >About a year back I purchased a Heston Blumenthal badged Salter oven
    >thermometer.
    >
    >My fan assisted oven does appear to switch on and off a few times before
    >appearing to settle at the correct temperature.
    >
    >Recently I purchased a Lakeland own brand oven thermometer for a
    >relative and decided to check against mine, it reacted to temperature a
    >lot quicker than the salter and read around 10c more.
    >
    >I am only a personal cook, casseroles, bread rolls, pasties and other
    >pastry types and haven't experienced any obvious problem but any
    >suggestions as to confirming accuracy of gauge.
    >
    >Geoff Lane


    This link will tell you how to determine if your oven thermometer is
    accurate and how to fix it if it isn't.

    http://www.ehow.com/how_5616112_cali...ermometer.html
    or
    http://tinyurl.com/7hd3ff4

    Good Luck
    Janet US

  13. #13
    gregz Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy

    Geoff Lane <[email protected]> wrote:
    > About a year back I purchased a Heston Blumenthal badged Salter oven thermometer.
    >
    > My fan assisted oven does appear to switch on and off a few times before
    > appearing to settle at the correct temperature.
    >
    > Recently I purchased a Lakeland own brand oven thermometer for a relative
    > and decided to check against mine, it reacted to temperature a lot
    > quicker than the salter and read around 10c more.
    >
    > I am only a personal cook, casseroles, bread rolls, pasties and other
    > pastry types and haven't experienced any obvious problem but any
    > suggestions as to confirming accuracy of gauge.
    >
    > Geoff Lane


    Only after you have compared thermometers can you actually know
    calibration. But, if it's a rod type, put in boiling water. That should
    give you a standard. Adjust for altitude.

    In a typical electric oven, you need to put the thermometer near the ovens
    sensor. That will tell oven calibration accuracy. A turbo oven would tend
    to be more stable throughout with nothing inside.

    Greg

  14. #14
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy


    "Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sat, 31 Mar 2012 09:35:02 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Krypsis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:jl6v69$m5l$[email protected]..
    >>> On 31/03/2012 9:25 PM, Geoff Lane wrote:
    >>>> About a year back I purchased a Heston Blumenthal badged Salter oven
    >>>> thermometer.

    (snip)
    >>>> I am only a personal cook, casseroles, bread rolls, pasties and other
    >>>> pastry types and haven't experienced any obvious problem but any
    >>>> suggestions as to confirming accuracy of gauge.
    >>>>
    >>>> Geoff Lane
    >>>
    >>> First point; Which guage is your reference point? You have calibrated
    >>> neither of your two thermometers against a known accurate reference
    >>> thermometer so any comparisons between the two are specious at best.

    >>(snippage)
    >>
    >>
    >>Specious, and totally unnecessary (IMHO). If his personal use isn't
    >>affected, why is he worried about how two thermometers compare? I don't
    >>have an oven thermometer. I know my (electric) oven well enough to know
    >>its
    >>quirks. I know when to raise or lower the temp, or adjust the length of
    >>cooking time, depending upon what I'm cooking. I use a meat thermometer
    >>for
    >>some roasts (like prime rib). To me, unless you have a really unreliable
    >>oven or aren't familiar with it, an oven thermometer is just another
    >>gadget.
    >>I've gotten along just fine without one all these years.
    >>
    >>Jill

    >
    > I own two cheapo oven thermometers but don't use them. I rely on the
    > stove's digital readout and my ability to bake a frozen pizza to my
    > liking. Oven temperature varies by shelf position anyway


    Absolutely! Which is why some recipes specify lower rack vs. upper rack.
    And of course they're adjustable.

    > and most cake recipes say to test for doneness with a
    > scientific instrument called a toothpic,


    +k Toothpick That's how I test cakes, muffins and cornbread.

    > and everyones concept of
    > "golden brown" is different. Oven temperature accuracy for baking a
    > cake is no more critical than fry pan temperature accuracy for a
    > grilled cheese.


    I agree with this! Why worry about it when there are other ways to test for
    doneness? If it's not broken, don't try to fix it.

    Jill


  15. #15
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy

    On Sun, 01 Apr 2012 01:31:15 +1100, Krypsis <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 1/04/2012 1:13 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >>
    >> "Janet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    >>> says...
    >>>>

    ><snip>
    >
    >>
    >> Also agreed. I had an element on my oven replaced last year. If you use
    >> your oven at all, you can tell when it's not working properly. The oven
    >> thermostat was also replaced. (Fortunately, I have a home warranty which
    >> covers repair or replacement of even appliances as old as mine - 1987.)
    >>
    >> I remember my great aunt Ada still cooking over a wood stove in the

    >
    >I grew up with one of those, a big green monster. Heated the hot water too.
    >
    >> early 1980's. Her "thermometer" was her hand held over the fire She
    >> baked fantastic pies. I remember she grew rhubarb out back in the

    >
    >We still have rhubarb out in the back garden. My wife has no idea what
    >to do with it so it sits there unused for the most part except when a
    >neighbour or friend wants some. I remember rhubarb as a dessert when I
    >was a kid ... very sweet. It had a lot of sugar added!
    >
    >> kitchen garden. She baked bread. Just like in the old days.
    >>
    >> Jill


    Check the postings for Melba's Jammin' recipe for rhubarb custard
    cake. Rhubarb makes good jams and jellies, alone or with other
    fruits.

    Think I will check to see if I have a Jiffy cake mix and make the
    cake.

    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  16. #16
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy

    On 3/31/2012 11:59 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > "Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Sat, 31 Mar 2012 09:35:02 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> "Krypsis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:jl6v69$m5l$[email protected]..
    >>>> On 31/03/2012 9:25 PM, Geoff Lane wrote:
    >>>>> About a year back I purchased a Heston Blumenthal badged Salter oven
    >>>>> thermometer.

    > (snip)
    >>>>> I am only a personal cook, casseroles, bread rolls, pasties and other
    >>>>> pastry types and haven't experienced any obvious problem but any
    >>>>> suggestions as to confirming accuracy of gauge.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Geoff Lane
    >>>>
    >>>> First point; Which guage is your reference point? You have calibrated
    >>>> neither of your two thermometers against a known accurate reference
    >>>> thermometer so any comparisons between the two are specious at best.
    >>> (snippage)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Specious, and totally unnecessary (IMHO). If his personal use isn't
    >>> affected, why is he worried about how two thermometers compare? I don't
    >>> have an oven thermometer. I know my (electric) oven well enough to
    >>> know its
    >>> quirks. I know when to raise or lower the temp, or adjust the length of
    >>> cooking time, depending upon what I'm cooking. I use a meat
    >>> thermometer for
    >>> some roasts (like prime rib). To me, unless you have a really unreliable
    >>> oven or aren't familiar with it, an oven thermometer is just another
    >>> gadget.
    >>> I've gotten along just fine without one all these years.
    >>>
    >>> Jill

    >>
    >> I own two cheapo oven thermometers but don't use them. I rely on the
    >> stove's digital readout and my ability to bake a frozen pizza to my
    >> liking. Oven temperature varies by shelf position anyway

    >
    > Absolutely! Which is why some recipes specify lower rack vs. upper rack.
    > And of course they're adjustable.
    >
    >> and most cake recipes say to test for doneness with a
    >> scientific instrument called a toothpic,

    >
    > +k Toothpick That's how I test cakes, muffins and cornbread.
    >
    >> and everyones concept of
    >> "golden brown" is different. Oven temperature accuracy for baking a
    >> cake is no more critical than fry pan temperature accuracy for a
    >> grilled cheese.

    >
    > I agree with this! Why worry about it when there are other ways to test
    > for doneness? If it's not broken, don't try to fix it.
    >
    > Jill


    I prefer the original wording even if it's ungrammatical; "If it ain't
    broke, don't fix it!"

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.

  17. #17
    Geoff Lane Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy

    On 31/03/2012 11:25, Geoff Lane wrote:

    > I am only a personal cook, casseroles, bread rolls, pasties and other
    > pastry types and haven't experienced any obvious problem but any
    > suggestions as to confirming accuracy of gauge.
    >
    > Geoff Lane


    Thanks people for all the helpful suggestions, I am relatively new to
    general cooking after my lovely wife passed away, she was a great cook
    and I picked up a few tips from her but am now getting more adventurous
    myself.

    I guessed the accuracy was not critical so will not worry about it but
    what I did find was my cooker's thermostat kept switching off before
    reaching the intended temperature, sometimes 20/30c below what was set,
    then it'd switch on again before appearing to settle at correct temperature.

    Now I use the oven thermometer to get it up to temperature then set the
    oven's themostat.

    Geoff Lane



  18. #18
    Pico Rico Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy


    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jl7akn$ltf$[email protected]..
    > On 3/31/2012 11:59 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >>
    >> "Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> On Sat, 31 Mar 2012 09:35:02 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> "Krypsis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>> news:jl6v69$m5l$[email protected]..
    >>>>> On 31/03/2012 9:25 PM, Geoff Lane wrote:
    >>>>>> About a year back I purchased a Heston Blumenthal badged Salter oven
    >>>>>> thermometer.

    >> (snip)
    >>>>>> I am only a personal cook, casseroles, bread rolls, pasties and other
    >>>>>> pastry types and haven't experienced any obvious problem but any
    >>>>>> suggestions as to confirming accuracy of gauge.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Geoff Lane
    >>>>>
    >>>>> First point; Which guage is your reference point? You have calibrated
    >>>>> neither of your two thermometers against a known accurate reference
    >>>>> thermometer so any comparisons between the two are specious at best.
    >>>> (snippage)
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Specious, and totally unnecessary (IMHO). If his personal use isn't
    >>>> affected, why is he worried about how two thermometers compare? I don't
    >>>> have an oven thermometer. I know my (electric) oven well enough to
    >>>> know its
    >>>> quirks. I know when to raise or lower the temp, or adjust the length of
    >>>> cooking time, depending upon what I'm cooking. I use a meat
    >>>> thermometer for
    >>>> some roasts (like prime rib). To me, unless you have a really
    >>>> unreliable
    >>>> oven or aren't familiar with it, an oven thermometer is just another
    >>>> gadget.
    >>>> I've gotten along just fine without one all these years.
    >>>>
    >>>> Jill
    >>>
    >>> I own two cheapo oven thermometers but don't use them. I rely on the
    >>> stove's digital readout and my ability to bake a frozen pizza to my
    >>> liking. Oven temperature varies by shelf position anyway

    >>
    >> Absolutely! Which is why some recipes specify lower rack vs. upper rack.
    >> And of course they're adjustable.
    >>
    >>> and most cake recipes say to test for doneness with a
    >>> scientific instrument called a toothpic,

    >>
    >> +k Toothpick That's how I test cakes, muffins and cornbread.
    >>
    >>> and everyones concept of
    >>> "golden brown" is different. Oven temperature accuracy for baking a
    >>> cake is no more critical than fry pan temperature accuracy for a
    >>> grilled cheese.

    >>
    >> I agree with this! Why worry about it when there are other ways to test
    >> for doneness? If it's not broken, don't try to fix it.
    >>
    >> Jill

    >
    > I prefer the original wording even if it's ungrammatical; "If it ain't
    > broke, don't fix it!"



    hey, most of the time, even if it IS broke . . .



  19. #19
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy

    On Mar 31, 9:22*am, Geoff Lane <datemasde....@gishpuppy.com> wrote:
    > On 31/03/2012 11:25, Geoff Lane wrote:
    >
    > > I am only a personal cook, casseroles, bread rolls, pasties and other
    > > pastry types and haven't experienced any obvious problem but any
    > > suggestions as to confirming accuracy of gauge.

    >
    > > Geoff Lane

    >
    > Thanks people for all the helpful suggestions, I am relatively new to
    > general cooking after my lovely wife passed away, she was a great cook
    > and I picked up a few tips from her but am now getting more adventurous
    > myself.
    >
    > I guessed the accuracy was not critical so will not worry about it but
    > what I did find was my cooker's thermostat kept switching off before
    > reaching the intended temperature, sometimes 20/30c below what was set,
    > then it'd switch on again before appearing to settle at correct temperature.
    >
    > Now I use the oven thermometer to get it up to temperature then set the
    > oven's themostat.
    >
    > Geoff Lane


    Sorry about your wife. Good for you for trying new things- that is the
    only way to learn!

  20. #20
    Krypsis Guest

    Default Re: Oven Thermometer Accuracy

    On 1/04/2012 2:58 AM, gregz wrote:
    > Geoff Lane<[email protected]> wrote:
    >> About a year back I purchased a Heston Blumenthal badged Salter oven thermometer.
    >>
    >> My fan assisted oven does appear to switch on and off a few times before
    >> appearing to settle at the correct temperature.
    >>
    >> Recently I purchased a Lakeland own brand oven thermometer for a relative
    >> and decided to check against mine, it reacted to temperature a lot
    >> quicker than the salter and read around 10c more.
    >>
    >> I am only a personal cook, casseroles, bread rolls, pasties and other
    >> pastry types and haven't experienced any obvious problem but any
    >> suggestions as to confirming accuracy of gauge.
    >>
    >> Geoff Lane

    >
    > Only after you have compared thermometers can you actually know
    > calibration.


    How does comparing 2 or more unknown thermometers enable one to
    calibrate a thermometer. I like Bull's "cluster agreement" for checking
    thermometers before buying. If nothing else, you're going with the odds.

    > But, if it's a rod type, put in boiling water. That should
    > give you a standard. Adjust for altitude.


    It's not only altitude that varies the boiling point of water. Purity of
    the water is another issue. Again, how critical does one need to be for
    cooking?
    >
    > In a typical electric oven, you need to put the thermometer near the ovens
    > sensor. That will tell oven calibration accuracy. A turbo oven would tend
    > to be more stable throughout with nothing inside.
    >

    This is your home calibrated thermometer, right?


    > Greg



    --

    Krypsis

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