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Thread: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

  1. #1
    Cheryl Guest

    Default OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    I just had a laptop die on me and I hadn't done a recent backup. Since
    it was the motherboard and not a hard drive crash, I bought an external
    drive bay that fit my laptop's SATA drive and was able to get all of my
    old data off and the thing only cost me $5 from Amazon, no shipping
    charge. That got me to thinking about some old hard drives from very
    old PC's that I removed from the cases before I gave away the case with
    motherboard and memory. I don't trust giving them away with the hard
    drive because unless you degauss properly, data can be recovered, and
    degaussing renders the drive useless anyway.

    So one of the old hard drives I have is one that came out of my son's
    computer. I'm not interested in "spying" on anything he did online, I'm
    only interested in finding music he might have recorded, or other works
    of art I've never seen.

    It's a very old Maxtor and so far I haven't found an external bay/case
    with connectors to make it a USB attached drive. Anyone know of any?
    It's a Maxtor model 9136OU4. One of those old heavy things with IDE
    connector pins and the pins for the power supply connector.

  2. #2
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    On 2/7/2011 10:02 PM, Cheryl wrote:
    > I just had a laptop die on me and I hadn't done a recent backup. Since
    > it was the motherboard and not a hard drive crash, I bought an external
    > drive bay that fit my laptop's SATA drive and was able to get all of my
    > old data off and the thing only cost me $5 from Amazon, no shipping
    > charge. That got me to thinking about some old hard drives from very old
    > PC's that I removed from the cases before I gave away the case with
    > motherboard and memory. I don't trust giving them away with the hard
    > drive because unless you degauss properly, data can be recovered, and
    > degaussing renders the drive useless anyway.
    >
    > So one of the old hard drives I have is one that came out of my son's
    > computer. I'm not interested in "spying" on anything he did online, I'm
    > only interested in finding music he might have recorded, or other works
    > of art I've never seen.
    >
    > It's a very old Maxtor and so far I haven't found an external bay/case
    > with connectors to make it a USB attached drive. Anyone know of any?
    > It's a Maxtor model 9136OU4. One of those old heavy things with IDE
    > connector pins and the pins for the power supply connector.


    If I still had a desktop I could mount the drive as a slave but I don't.
    Gave them all away.


  3. #3
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    In article <4d50be83$0$29436$[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > On 2/7/2011 10:02 PM, Cheryl wrote:
    > > I just had a laptop die on me and I hadn't done a recent backup. Since
    > > it was the motherboard and not a hard drive crash, I bought an external
    > > drive bay that fit my laptop's SATA drive and was able to get all of my
    > > old data off and the thing only cost me $5 from Amazon, no shipping
    > > charge. That got me to thinking about some old hard drives from very old
    > > PC's that I removed from the cases before I gave away the case with
    > > motherboard and memory. I don't trust giving them away with the hard
    > > drive because unless you degauss properly, data can be recovered, and
    > > degaussing renders the drive useless anyway.
    > >
    > > So one of the old hard drives I have is one that came out of my son's
    > > computer. I'm not interested in "spying" on anything he did online, I'm
    > > only interested in finding music he might have recorded, or other works
    > > of art I've never seen.
    > >
    > > It's a very old Maxtor and so far I haven't found an external bay/case
    > > with connectors to make it a USB attached drive. Anyone know of any?
    > > It's a Maxtor model 9136OU4. One of those old heavy things with IDE
    > > connector pins and the pins for the power supply connector.

    >
    > If I still had a desktop I could mount the drive as a slave but I don't.
    > Gave them all away.


    Here's one option <http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?
    Item=N82E16812232002>. If you search the newegg site you'll find
    others.





  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    On Mon, 07 Feb 2011 22:02:55 -0500, Cheryl wrote:

    > It's a very old Maxtor and so far I haven't found an external bay/case
    > with connectors to make it a USB attached drive. Anyone know of any?
    > It's a Maxtor model 9136OU4. One of those old heavy things with IDE
    > connector pins and the pins for the power supply connector.


    I'm not going to look up the model info. Tell us the interface
    instead. Then you're already half way to your answer.

    -s ESDI w

  5. #5
    Krypsis Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    On 8/02/2011 4:41 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Mon, 07 Feb 2011 22:02:55 -0500, Cheryl wrote:
    >
    >> It's a very old Maxtor and so far I haven't found an external bay/case
    >> with connectors to make it a USB attached drive. Anyone know of any?
    >> It's a Maxtor model 9136OU4. One of those old heavy things with IDE
    >> connector pins and the pins for the power supply connector.

    >
    > I'm not going to look up the model info. Tell us the interface
    > instead. Then you're already half way to your answer.
    >
    > -s ESDI w


    Too recent for ESDI

    Looks like a standard old IDE 13 Gig 5400rpm hard drive. Very common
    interface on computer motherboards until recently but most still retain
    at least one such interface for the CDROM/DVD drive. Should be a no
    brainer to attach the drive to most recent PCs. You'll need to open up
    the PC as these interfaces weren't known to be connected to external
    ports. Apart from a suitable ribbon cable, your average PC should be
    able to accommodate the drive quite easily. The ribbon cables are
    readily available and cheap these days. Your computer should have a
    spare power supply connector internally as well.
    In the past I have taken the side off the case, fitted the drive to an
    unused connector on the motherboard and connected up the power to it.
    Didn't even install the hard drive into the case, just left it sitting
    on the benchtop. Only needed to get into the BIOS when booting to ensure
    the PC was aware of the drive.

    These days I use an external USB enabled caddy for such work. Saves
    delving into PC cases.

    Krypsis




  6. #6
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    In article <4d50b2f9$0$29421$[email protected]>,
    Cheryl <[email protected]> wrote:


    > I don't trust giving them away with the hard
    > drive because unless you degauss properly, data can be recovered, and
    > degaussing renders the drive useless anyway.


    That seems very odd. I looked on my system and found the disk
    management utility. It has an erase function with four levels of
    security.

    1. None. The data is all there, and just the directory is erased.
    2. Quick. The entire disk is overwritten with zeroes.
    3. 7. The entire disk is overwritten seven times. This satisfies some
    DoD security requirement.
    4. 35. The entire disk is overwritten thirty-five times.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  7. #7
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    In article <dabel-ACF38A.08220508022011@c-61-68-245-
    199.per.connect.net.au>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > In article <4d50b2f9$0$29421$[email protected]>,
    > Cheryl <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > > I don't trust giving them away with the hard
    > > drive because unless you degauss properly, data can be recovered, and
    > > degaussing renders the drive useless anyway.

    >
    > That seems very odd. I looked on my system and found the disk
    > management utility. It has an erase function with four levels of
    > security.
    >
    > 1. None. The data is all there, and just the directory is erased.
    > 2. Quick. The entire disk is overwritten with zeroes.
    > 3. 7. The entire disk is overwritten seven times. This satisfies some
    > DoD security requirement.
    > 4. 35. The entire disk is overwritten thirty-five times.


    Personally if I really care whether anybody recovers the data I pull the
    platters out and go after 'em with a disk sander.



  8. #8
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 08:22:05 -0800, Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <4d50b2f9$0$29421$[email protected]>,
    > Cheryl <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> I don't trust giving them away with the hard
    >> drive because unless you degauss properly, data can be recovered, and
    >> degaussing renders the drive useless anyway.

    >
    >That seems very odd. I looked on my system and found the disk
    >management utility. It has an erase function with four levels of
    >security.
    >
    >1. None. The data is all there, and just the directory is erased.
    >2. Quick. The entire disk is overwritten with zeroes.
    >3. 7. The entire disk is overwritten seven times. This satisfies some
    >DoD security requirement.
    >4. 35. The entire disk is overwritten thirty-five times.


    What disk management utility is it? Anything that provides DoD security wiping
    has to be an after market add on, such as mine which encrypts the data to
    military 128 and then wipes it... no one's reading that drive ;-)
    or if really don't want people reading your old drives then beat the hell out
    of them with a sludge hammer, new drives are sooo cheap to buy.

  9. #9
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    On Tue, 8 Feb 2011 11:57:28 -0500, "J. Clarke" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <dabel-ACF38A.08220508022011@c-61-68-245-
    >199.per.connect.net.au>, [email protected] says...
    >>
    >> In article <4d50b2f9$0$29421$[email protected]>,
    >> Cheryl <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> > I don't trust giving them away with the hard
    >> > drive because unless you degauss properly, data can be recovered, and
    >> > degaussing renders the drive useless anyway.

    >>
    >> That seems very odd. I looked on my system and found the disk
    >> management utility. It has an erase function with four levels of
    >> security.
    >>
    >> 1. None. The data is all there, and just the directory is erased.
    >> 2. Quick. The entire disk is overwritten with zeroes.
    >> 3. 7. The entire disk is overwritten seven times. This satisfies some
    >> DoD security requirement.
    >> 4. 35. The entire disk is overwritten thirty-five times.

    >
    >Personally if I really care whether anybody recovers the data I pull the
    >platters out and go after 'em with a disk sander.
    >


    Throw the platters in a sand blaster

  10. #10
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > On Tue, 8 Feb 2011 11:57:28 -0500, "J. Clarke" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <dabel-ACF38A.08220508022011@c-61-68-245-
    > >199.per.connect.net.au>, [email protected] says...
    > >>
    > >> In article <4d50b2f9$0$29421$[email protected]>,
    > >> Cheryl <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> > I don't trust giving them away with the hard
    > >> > drive because unless you degauss properly, data can be recovered, and
    > >> > degaussing renders the drive useless anyway.
    > >>
    > >> That seems very odd. I looked on my system and found the disk
    > >> management utility. It has an erase function with four levels of
    > >> security.
    > >>
    > >> 1. None. The data is all there, and just the directory is erased.
    > >> 2. Quick. The entire disk is overwritten with zeroes.
    > >> 3. 7. The entire disk is overwritten seven times. This satisfies some
    > >> DoD security requirement.
    > >> 4. 35. The entire disk is overwritten thirty-five times.

    > >
    > >Personally if I really care whether anybody recovers the data I pull the
    > >platters out and go after 'em with a disk sander.
    > >

    >
    > Throw the platters in a sand blaster


    Certainly a viable option if you have one.

    Setting them under a bucket of thermite and lighting it off is another
    approach.



  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 11:07:35 -0600, Stu <[email protected]> wrote:

    > new drives are sooo cheap to buy


    Yeah, but so are new computers. Why put a new hard drive in an old
    computer? That has never made sense to me.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  12. #12
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 10:50:05 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 11:07:35 -0600, Stu <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> new drives are sooo cheap to buy

    >
    >Yeah, but so are new computers. Why put a new hard drive in an old
    >computer? That has never made sense to me.


    I always reuse my HD's, I wipe them and use them in rebuilt computers which
    always end up donated to computers for kids. This organization makes sure
    families living in poverty get a useable free computer for the kids to do
    homework on. It's all volunteers, with hardware and software donated.

  13. #13
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    Krypsis wrote:
    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >> Cheryl wrote:

    >
    >>> It's a very old Maxtor and so far I haven't found an external bay/case
    >>> with connectors to make it a USB attached drive. Anyone know of any?
    >>> It's a Maxtor model 9136OU4. One of those old heavy things with IDE
    >>> connector pins and the pins for the power supply connector.

    >
    >> I'm not going to look up the model info. Tell us the interface
    >> instead. Then you're already half way to your answer.

    >
    >> -s ESDI w

    >
    > Too recent for ESDI


    Chortle. The last time I touched an Extended Small Disk Interconnect
    drive was on a MicroVAX in 1985. I thought the response was hilarious
    because of the ancient acronym and the fact that the question did
    include the interface.

    > Looks like a standard old IDE 13 Gig 5400rpm hard drive. Very common
    > interface on computer motherboards until recently but most still retain
    > at least one such interface for the CDROM/DVD drive. Should be a no
    > brainer to attach the drive to most recent PCs. You'll need to open up
    > the PC as these interfaces weren't known to be connected to external
    > ports. Apart from a suitable ribbon cable, your average PC should be
    > able to accommodate the drive quite easily. The ribbon cables are
    > readily available and cheap these days. Your computer should have a
    > spare power supply connector internally as well.
    > In the past I have taken the side off the case, fitted the drive to an
    > unused connector on the motherboard and connected up the power to it.
    > Didn't even install the hard drive into the case, just left it sitting
    > on the benchtop. Only needed to get into the BIOS when booting to ensure
    > the PC was aware of the drive.
    >
    > These days I use an external USB enabled caddy for such work. Saves
    > delving into PC cases.


    I recently went to Frys and bought an SATA to USB converter cable for
    about $25. If you can find a mounting box that has the correct IDE
    pinout chances are its external interface has the denser pinout. Two
    steps of conversion rather than one.

  14. #14
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    J. Clarke wrote:
    > [email protected] says...
    >
    >> That seems very odd. I looked on my system and found the disk
    >> management utility. It has an erase function with four levels of
    >> security.
    >>
    >> 1. None. The data is all there, and just the directory is erased.
    >> 2. Quick. The entire disk is overwritten with zeroes.
    >> 3. 7. The entire disk is overwritten seven times. This satisfies some
    >> DoD security requirement.
    >> 4. 35. The entire disk is overwritten thirty-five times.


    There are several levels of DoD security ratings. The details of each
    one are classified at the next level up so if you've held some level in
    the past you aren't authorized to know the name of the next level.
    Anyways, satisfying that DoD requirement is good enough for any data I
    have ever put on any disk in a non-classifed environment. And most of
    the classified work I did back in the day. So go for the 7 pass option.
    I prefer using random data patterns not just zeros.

    > Personally if I really care whether anybody recovers the data I pull the
    > platters out and go after 'em with a disk sander.


    I have done that for disks coming out of classified environments back in
    the day. Wear a breathing mask because it gets very dusty in that tiny
    little closet with drills and sanders and grinders.

  15. #15
    Nad R Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    Stu <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 10:50:05 -0800, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 11:07:35 -0600, Stu <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> new drives are sooo cheap to buy

    >>
    >> Yeah, but so are new computers. Why put a new hard drive in an old
    >> computer? That has never made sense to me.

    >
    > I always reuse my HD's, I wipe them and use them in rebuilt computers which
    > always end up donated to computers for kids. This organization makes sure
    > families living in poverty get a useable free computer for the kids to do
    > homework on. It's all volunteers, with hardware and software donated.


    I do not trust the reformatting of old hard drives and it takes to long. I
    use an old sledge hammer for my old hard drives.

    --
    Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

  16. #16
    Nad R Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    Doug Freyburger <[email protected]> wrote:
    > J. Clarke wrote:
    >> [email protected] says...
    >>
    >>> That seems very odd. I looked on my system and found the disk
    >>> management utility. It has an erase function with four levels of
    >>> security.
    >>>
    >>> 1. None. The data is all there, and just the directory is erased.
    >>> 2. Quick. The entire disk is overwritten with zeroes.
    >>> 3. 7. The entire disk is overwritten seven times. This satisfies some
    >>> DoD security requirement.
    >>> 4. 35. The entire disk is overwritten thirty-five times.

    >
    > There are several levels of DoD security ratings. The details of each
    > one are classified at the next level up so if you've held some level in
    > the past you aren't authorized to know the name of the next level.
    > Anyways, satisfying that DoD requirement is good enough for any data I
    > have ever put on any disk in a non-classifed environment. And most of
    > the classified work I did back in the day. So go for the 7 pass option.
    > I prefer using random data patterns not just zeros.
    >
    >> Personally if I really care whether anybody recovers the data I pull the
    >> platters out and go after 'em with a disk sander.

    >
    > I have done that for disks coming out of classified environments back in
    > the day. Wear a breathing mask because it gets very dusty in that tiny
    > little closet with drills and sanders and grinders.


    Choose DoD wipe that also removes the security tracks on the hard drive.
    Reformatting a hard drive will not remove the that information. Also those
    security tracks can have information about you, especially if you installed
    tracking software on it in case computer was stolen.

    The sledge hammer is my favorite way to reformat the hard drive.

    --
    Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

  17. #17
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    On 2/8/2011 11:31 AM, Nad R wrote:
    > Stu<[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 10:50:05 -0800, sf<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 11:07:35 -0600, Stu<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> new drives are sooo cheap to buy
    >>>
    >>> Yeah, but so are new computers. Why put a new hard drive in an old
    >>> computer? That has never made sense to me.

    >>
    >> I always reuse my HD's, I wipe them and use them in rebuilt computers which
    >> always end up donated to computers for kids. This organization makes sure
    >> families living in poverty get a useable free computer for the kids to do
    >> homework on. It's all volunteers, with hardware and software donated.

    >
    > I do not trust the reformatting of old hard drives and it takes to long. I
    > use an old sledge hammer for my old hard drives.
    >


    What the heck do you guys have on these drives?! The recipe for original
    Coca-Cola? Super nasty ultra-porn? Snuff vids?? :-)

    I have quite a collection of drives in my drawer. I try to recycle them
    but some of them are unreliable and there's not too much use for drives
    under 40GB or so in this world of Windows. OTOH, a 20GB drive would work
    fine in a Linux machine. If I know that a drive is definitely dead, I'll
    take it apart to salvage the magnets - I like magnets. If someone wants
    to try to get data from the drive after that, I suppose they're welcome
    to try. :-)

  18. #18
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Stu <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 08:22:05 -0800, Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <4d50b2f9$0$29421$[email protected]>,
    > > Cheryl <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >> I don't trust giving them away with the hard
    > >> drive because unless you degauss properly, data can be recovered, and
    > >> degaussing renders the drive useless anyway.

    > >
    > >That seems very odd. I looked on my system and found the disk
    > >management utility. It has an erase function with four levels of
    > >security.
    > >
    > >1. None. The data is all there, and just the directory is erased.
    > >2. Quick. The entire disk is overwritten with zeroes.
    > >3. 7. The entire disk is overwritten seven times. This satisfies some
    > >DoD security requirement.
    > >4. 35. The entire disk is overwritten thirty-five times.

    >
    > What disk management utility is it?


    It's called Disk Utility.app and came with my new Mac (in 2006).

    > Anything that provides DoD security wiping
    > has to be an after market add on, such as mine which encrypts the data to
    > military 128 and then wipes it... no one's reading that drive ;-)
    > or if really don't want people reading your old drives then beat the hell out
    > of them with a sludge hammer, new drives are sooo cheap to buy.


    I don't care about the info on my drive. I'll be lucky to remember to
    delete the files at all. I was just surprised that Cheryl's computer
    didn't come with a utility that wipes the drive a little more securely.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  19. #19
    Nad R Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    dsi1 <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 2/8/2011 11:31 AM, Nad R wrote:
    >> Stu<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 10:50:05 -0800, sf<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Tue, 08 Feb 2011 11:07:35 -0600, Stu<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> new drives are sooo cheap to buy
    >>>>
    >>>> Yeah, but so are new computers. Why put a new hard drive in an old
    >>>> computer? That has never made sense to me.
    >>>
    >>> I always reuse my HD's, I wipe them and use them in rebuilt computers which
    >>> always end up donated to computers for kids. This organization makes sure
    >>> families living in poverty get a useable free computer for the kids to do
    >>> homework on. It's all volunteers, with hardware and software donated.

    >>
    >> I do not trust the reformatting of old hard drives and it takes to long. I
    >> use an old sledge hammer for my old hard drives.
    >>

    >
    > What the heck do you guys have on these drives?! The recipe for original
    > Coca-Cola? Super nasty ultra-porn? Snuff vids?? :-)
    >
    > I have quite a collection of drives in my drawer. I try to recycle them
    > but some of them are unreliable and there's not too much use for drives
    > under 40GB or so in this world of Windows. OTOH, a 20GB drive would work
    > fine in a Linux machine. If I know that a drive is definitely dead, I'll
    > take it apart to salvage the magnets - I like magnets. If someone wants
    > to try to get data from the drive after that, I suppose they're welcome to try. :-)


    Hmmmm.... If I told you what I have on them.... I would have to ....

    --
    Enjoy Life... Nad R (Garden in zone 5a Michigan)

  20. #20
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: OT to you techies - the rest of you ignore

    On 2/8/2011 10:29 AM, Krypsis wrote:
    >
    > Looks like a standard old IDE 13 Gig 5400rpm hard drive. Very common
    > interface on computer motherboards until recently but most still retain
    > at least one such interface for the CDROM/DVD drive. Should be a no
    > brainer to attach the drive to most recent PCs. You'll need to open up
    > the PC as these interfaces weren't known to be connected to external
    > ports. Apart from a suitable ribbon cable, your average PC should be
    > able to accommodate the drive quite easily. The ribbon cables are
    > readily available and cheap these days. Your computer should have a
    > spare power supply connector internally as well.


    I don't have any desktop PCs around, so that's why I bought an external
    case. I know I could make it a slave if I had a PC.

    > In the past I have taken the side off the case, fitted the drive to an
    > unused connector on the motherboard and connected up the power to it.
    > Didn't even install the hard drive into the case, just left it sitting
    > on the benchtop. Only needed to get into the BIOS when booting to ensure
    > the PC was aware of the drive.
    >
    > These days I use an external USB enabled caddy for such work. Saves
    > delving into PC cases


    Yup, that's what I'm trying to do. I'm just trying to find the right
    external case because the one that "sounded" right by the description,
    wasn't.


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