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Thread: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

  1. #1
    Stu Guest

    Default OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys


    Thought you'd all like something to brighten your day..
    I made my sister in law cry when I sent it to her, Chris is in Iraq
    right now on third tour.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=hkGzqpGx1KU

  2. #2
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    On Jun 1, 8:45*am, Stu <i...@foodforu.ca> wrote:
    > Thought you'd all like something to brighten your day..
    > I made my sister in law cry when I sent it to her, Chris is in Iraq
    > right now on third tour.
    >
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=hkGzqpGx1KU


    Awesome!!

  3. #3
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    On Jun 1, 10:45*am, Stu <i...@foodforu.ca> wrote:
    > Thought you'd all like something to brighten your day..
    > I made my sister in law cry when I sent it to her, Chris is in Iraq
    > right now on third tour.
    >
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=hkGzqpGx1KU


    Your cluelessness when it comes to wrinting brightens all our days.
    The fact that your spelling skills are at about an eight year old
    level does not suggest anything else about you concerning young
    children.

    --Bryan

  4. #4
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    On Jun 1, 12:21*pm, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Jun 1, 10:45*am, Stu <i...@foodforu.ca> wrote:
    >
    > > Thought you'd all like something to brighten your day..
    > > I made my sister in law cry when I sent it to her, Chris is in Iraq
    > > right now on third tour.

    >
    > >http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=hkGzqpGx1KU

    >
    > Your cluelessness when it comes to wrinting brightens all our days.
    > The fact that your spelling skills are at about an eight year old
    > level does not suggest anything else about you concerning young
    > children.
    >
    > --Bryan


    What about your spelling skills? wrinting????

  5. #5
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    On Jun 1, 2:41*pm, Chemo the Clown <an...@peak.org> wrote:
    > On Jun 1, 12:21*pm, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > On Jun 1, 10:45*am, Stu <i...@foodforu.ca> wrote:

    >
    > > > Thought you'd all like something to brighten your day..
    > > > I made my sister in law cry when I sent it to her, Chris is in Iraq
    > > > right now on third tour.

    >
    > > >http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=hkGzqpGx1KU

    >
    > > Your cluelessness when it comes to wrinting brightens all our days.
    > > The fact that your spelling skills are at about an eight year old
    > > level does not suggest anything else about you concerning young
    > > children.

    >
    > > --Bryan

    >
    > What about your spelling skills? wrinting????


    A typo. A very infrequent typo.

    --Bryan

  6. #6
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    On Jun 1, 12:42*pm, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Jun 1, 2:41*pm, Chemo the Clown <an...@peak.org> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jun 1, 12:21*pm, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > > > On Jun 1, 10:45*am, Stu <i...@foodforu.ca> wrote:

    >
    > > > > Thought you'd all like something to brighten your day..
    > > > > I made my sister in law cry when I sent it to her, Chris is in Iraq
    > > > > right now on third tour.

    >
    > > > >http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=hkGzqpGx1KU

    >
    > > > Your cluelessness when it comes to wrinting brightens all our days.
    > > > The fact that your spelling skills are at about an eight year old
    > > > level does not suggest anything else about you concerning young
    > > > children.

    >
    > > > --Bryan

    >
    > > What about your spelling skills? wrinting????

    >
    > A typo. *A very infrequent typo.
    >
    > --Bryan


    Yeah, yeah, yeah....blame it on a typo.

  7. #7
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    On Tue, 1 Jun 2010 12:21:37 -0700 (PDT), Food SnobŪ
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Jun 1, 10:45*am, Stu <i...@foodforu.ca> wrote:
    >> Thought you'd all like something to brighten your day..
    >> I made my sister in law cry when I sent it to her, Chris is in Iraq
    >> right now on third tour.
    >>
    >> http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=hkGzqpGx1KU

    >
    >Your cluelessness when it comes to wrinting brightens all our days.
    >The fact that your spelling skills are at about an eight year old
    >level does not suggest anything else about you concerning young
    >children.
    >
    >--Bryan


    You don't care about anything do you bryan, you must lead a sad
    existence.

  8. #8
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    On Tue, 1 Jun 2010 12:41:17 -0700 (PDT), Chemo the Clown
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Jun 1, 12:21*pm, Food SnobŪ <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> On Jun 1, 10:45*am, Stu <i...@foodforu.ca> wrote:
    >>
    >> > Thought you'd all like something to brighten your day..
    >> > I made my sister in law cry when I sent it to her, Chris is in Iraq
    >> > right now on third tour.

    >>
    >> >http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=hkGzqpGx1KU

    >>
    >> Your cluelessness when it comes to wrinting brightens all our days.
    >> The fact that your spelling skills are at about an eight year old
    >> level does not suggest anything else about you concerning young
    >> children.
    >>
    >> --Bryan

    >
    >What about your spelling skills? wrinting????


    I was going to say something, then thought better of it, he wouldn't
    understand anyway.

  9. #9
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    On Jun 1, 3:26*pm, Stu <i...@foodforu.ca> wrote:
    > On Tue, 1 Jun 2010 12:21:37 -0700 (PDT), Food SnobŪ
    >
    > <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > >On Jun 1, 10:45*am, Stu <i...@foodforu.ca> wrote:
    > >> Thought you'd all like something to brighten your day..
    > >> I made my sister in law cry when I sent it to her, Chris is in Iraq
    > >> right now on third tour.

    >
    > >>http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=hkGzqpGx1KU

    >
    > >Your cluelessness when it comes to wrinting brightens all our days.
    > >The fact that your spelling skills are at about an eight year old
    > >level does not suggest anything else about you concerning young
    > >children.

    >
    > >--Bryan

    >
    > You don't care about anything do you bryan, you must lead a sad
    > existence.


    Hey, I'm on your side in the whole "Sideshow Bob" thing. Not because
    I particularly like either of you, but because you're morew in the
    right.

    --Bryan

  10. #10
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    "Stu" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    >
    > Thought you'd all like something to brighten your day..
    > I made my sister in law cry when I sent it to her, Chris is in Iraq
    > right now on third tour.
    >
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=hkGzqpGx1KU




    This brought tears to my eyes. I remember when my father returned from his
    second tour in VietNam. It wasn't a surprise but I was only 8 years old and
    I was thrilled to see him get off that plane. No matter what anyone thinks
    of any war, god bless the troups. Thanks, Stu.

    Jill


  11. #11
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    On Wed, 2 Jun 2010 09:31:29 -0400, "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >"Stu" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news[email protected]..
    >>
    >> Thought you'd all like something to brighten your day..
    >> I made my sister in law cry when I sent it to her, Chris is in Iraq
    >> right now on third tour.
    >>
    >> http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=hkGzqpGx1KU

    >
    >
    >
    >This brought tears to my eyes. I remember when my father returned from his
    >second tour in VietNam. It wasn't a surprise but I was only 8 years old and
    >I was thrilled to see him get off that plane. No matter what anyone thinks
    >of any war, god bless the troups. Thanks, Stu.
    >
    >Jill


    Your welcome. My nephews' last tour is over in October, three years
    over there is enough. His hitch is up June 2011, they want him to help
    out other returning vets till he gets out, he's got a degree in
    physiology so I guess his knowledge and that he can relate will help
    greatly.

  12. #12
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    jmcquown wrote:

    > This brought tears to my eyes. I remember when my father returned from
    > his second tour in VietNam. It wasn't a surprise but I was only 8 years
    > old and I was thrilled to see him get off that plane. No matter what
    > anyone thinks of any war, god bless the troups. Thanks, Stu.



    I can imagine how happy you were to see him home safely after being away
    for so long. Soldiers these days are lucky that deployments tend to be
    shorter. My father joined the air force in 1940 and was shipped over to
    England in the spring of 1941. He was over there for two years before he
    could come home, and he would have had to stay longer had he not been
    shot down over Denmark and managed to escape back to England. He was
    given a one month leave and had to sail back.

    His parents didn't know that he was coming home. The last they had
    heard, he was still in Sweden and waiting to get back to England. He
    didn't bother to call when he arrived in the city and just showed up
    unannounced. His parents were thrilled.

    My uncle was in the army and was shipped overseas in 1941. He fought his
    way through North Africa, Sicily, Italy and Holland. He came home to
    find that his wife had left him for another man. Four years of being
    away from home and enduring hardships and privation... plus being shot at.

    It's interesting that guys like this endured the horrors of war for
    extended periods and came back, picked up where they left off and led
    normal lives. Soldiers these days live with a much higher level of
    comfort, have a much better chance of survival and spend relatively
    short periods of time on deployment. They can communicate with their
    families by telephone and email. Yet, a high percentage of them come
    back claiming of post traumatic stress,even among those who aren't on
    the front lines.


  13. #13
    PL away from home Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    On Jun 3, 1:41*am, Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:

    > It's interesting that guys like this endured the horrors of war for
    > extended periods and came back, picked up where they left off and led
    > normal lives.



    You better really think about that, before you say it.

    "Normal lives"...... I don't think so.



    > Soldiers these days live with a much higher level of
    > comfort,



    When was the last time you were deployed to Iraq, or Afghanistan?


    > have a much better chance of survival and spend relatively
    > short periods of time on deployment. They can communicate with their
    > families by telephone and email.



    It's the electronic age.



    > Yet, a high percentage of them come
    > back claiming of post traumatic stress,even among those who aren't on
    > the front lines.



    I agree.

    I find it hard to stomach people, such as certain Merchant Navy
    persons, passing themselves off as "combat veterans".
    It's really quite disgusting that they do it.



  14. #14
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    On Wed, 2 Jun 2010 10:02:42 -0700 (PDT), PL away from home
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Jun 3, 1:41*am, Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    >
    >> It's interesting that guys like this endured the horrors of war for
    >> extended periods and came back, picked up where they left off and led
    >> normal lives.

    >
    >
    >You better really think about that, before you say it.
    >
    >"Normal lives"...... I don't think so.
    >
    >
    >
    >> Soldiers these days live with a much higher level of
    >> comfort,

    >
    >
    >When was the last time you were deployed to Iraq, or Afghanistan?
    >
    >
    >> have a much better chance of survival and spend relatively
    >> short periods of time on deployment. They can communicate with their
    >> families by telephone and email.

    >
    >
    >It's the electronic age.
    >
    >
    >
    >> Yet, a high percentage of them come
    >> back claiming of post traumatic stress,even among those who aren't on
    >> the front lines.

    >
    >
    >I agree.
    >
    >I find it hard to stomach people, such as certain Merchant Navy
    >persons, passing themselves off as "combat veterans".
    >It's really quite disgusting that they do it.
    >


    My father was on a mine sweeper, most of the sailors I talked to said
    sure they were scared, who wouldn't be when a mine the size of a small
    house popped up beside your ship. Then there was the enemy
    that wanted to sink you and constantly attacked because the enemy
    didn't want you clearing their mines. He got shot up twice and came
    home with all sorts of problems both physically and mentally.

  15. #15
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    On 6/2/2010 10:41 AM, Dave Smith wrote:
    > jmcquown wrote:
    >
    >> This brought tears to my eyes. I remember when my father returned from
    >> his second tour in VietNam. It wasn't a surprise but I was only 8
    >> years old and I was thrilled to see him get off that plane. No matter
    >> what anyone thinks of any war, god bless the troups. Thanks, Stu.

    >
    >
    > I can imagine how happy you were to see him home safely after being away
    > for so long. Soldiers these days are lucky that deployments tend to be
    > shorter. My father joined the air force in 1940 and was shipped over to
    > England in the spring of 1941. He was over there for two years before he
    > could come home, and he would have had to stay longer had he not been
    > shot down over Denmark and managed to escape back to England. He was
    > given a one month leave and had to sail back.
    >
    > His parents didn't know that he was coming home. The last they had
    > heard, he was still in Sweden and waiting to get back to England. He
    > didn't bother to call when he arrived in the city and just showed up
    > unannounced. His parents were thrilled.
    >
    > My uncle was in the army and was shipped overseas in 1941. He fought his
    > way through North Africa, Sicily, Italy and Holland. He came home to
    > find that his wife had left him for another man. Four years of being
    > away from home and enduring hardships and privation... plus being shot at.
    >
    > It's interesting that guys like this endured the horrors of war for
    > extended periods and came back, picked up where they left off and led
    > normal lives. Soldiers these days live with a much higher level of
    > comfort, have a much better chance of survival and spend relatively
    > short periods of time on deployment. They can communicate with their
    > families by telephone and email. Yet, a high percentage of them come
    > back claiming of post traumatic stress,even among those who aren't on
    > the front lines.
    >

    Some very large differences Dave. Back then the troops had a clearly
    defined enemy who was in uniform, mostly. Nowadays most of the enemy are
    dressed in civilian clothing, blend in well with the surrounding
    population and there are clearly defined rules of engagement, often
    causing troops to take chances they shouldn't have to take.

    In WWII and Korea PTSD was called combat fatigue but was basically the
    same syndrome. My eldest brother-in-law was a Navy medic assigned to the
    USMC, he was in almost continuous battle from early 1942 until he was
    wounded severely enough to be pulled out of battle the day before VJ
    Day. My sister didn't get to see him until mid-1946 and he wasn't
    discharged to go home until early 1947. He had what we used to call a
    Section 8 discharge. He was jumpy at loud noises, very protective of
    family, to the extent he would throw his wife and daughter on the ground
    and cover them with his body if he heard anything resembling a gunshot
    sound. He was a good man who died at age 61 from chronic alcoholism and
    too many cigarettes, he died two months after being diagnosed with
    pancreatic cancer, brought on by booze and smoking according to the doctors.

    I see young troops coming back here with many of the same symptoms, a
    different war, a different generation, many of the same problems. God
    Bless Our Troops and their families, both have a tough time.

  16. #16
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Some very large differences Dave. Back then the troops had a clearly
    >defined enemy who was in uniform, mostly. Nowadays most of the enemy are
    >dressed in civilian clothing, blend in well with the surrounding
    >population and there are clearly defined rules of engagement, often
    >causing troops to take chances they shouldn't have to take.


    Maybe the enemy finally got around to reading the history
    of the American Revolution.



    Steve

  17. #17
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys



    "George Shirley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ...
    > On 6/2/2010 10:41 AM, Dave Smith wrote:
    >> jmcquown wrote:
    >>
    >>> This brought tears to my eyes. I remember when my father returned from
    >>> his second tour in VietNam. It wasn't a surprise but I was only 8
    >>> years old and I was thrilled to see him get off that plane. No matter
    >>> what anyone thinks of any war, god bless the troups. Thanks, Stu.

    >>
    >>
    >> I can imagine how happy you were to see him home safely after being away
    >> for so long. Soldiers these days are lucky that deployments tend to be
    >> shorter. My father joined the air force in 1940 and was shipped over to
    >> England in the spring of 1941. He was over there for two years before he
    >> could come home, and he would have had to stay longer had he not been
    >> shot down over Denmark and managed to escape back to England. He was
    >> given a one month leave and had to sail back.
    >>
    >> His parents didn't know that he was coming home. The last they had
    >> heard, he was still in Sweden and waiting to get back to England. He
    >> didn't bother to call when he arrived in the city and just showed up
    >> unannounced. His parents were thrilled.
    >>
    >> My uncle was in the army and was shipped overseas in 1941. He fought his
    >> way through North Africa, Sicily, Italy and Holland. He came home to
    >> find that his wife had left him for another man. Four years of being
    >> away from home and enduring hardships and privation... plus being shot
    >> at.
    >>
    >> It's interesting that guys like this endured the horrors of war for
    >> extended periods and came back, picked up where they left off and led
    >> normal lives. Soldiers these days live with a much higher level of
    >> comfort, have a much better chance of survival and spend relatively
    >> short periods of time on deployment. They can communicate with their
    >> families by telephone and email. Yet, a high percentage of them come
    >> back claiming of post traumatic stress,even among those who aren't on
    >> the front lines.
    >>

    > Some very large differences Dave. Back then the troops had a clearly
    > defined enemy who was in uniform, mostly. Nowadays most of the enemy are
    > dressed in civilian clothing, blend in well with the surrounding
    > population and there are clearly defined rules of engagement, often
    > causing troops to take chances they shouldn't have to take.
    >
    > In WWII and Korea PTSD was called combat fatigue but was basically the
    > same syndrome. My eldest brother-in-law was a Navy medic assigned to the
    > USMC, he was in almost continuous battle from early 1942 until he was
    > wounded severely enough to be pulled out of battle the day before VJ Day.
    > My sister didn't get to see him until mid-1946 and he wasn't discharged to
    > go home until early 1947. He had what we used to call a Section 8
    > discharge. He was jumpy at loud noises, very protective of family, to the
    > extent he would throw his wife and daughter on the ground and cover them
    > with his body if he heard anything resembling a gunshot sound. He was a
    > good man who died at age 61 from chronic alcoholism and too many
    > cigarettes, he died two months after being diagnosed with pancreatic
    > cancer, brought on by booze and smoking according to the doctors.
    >
    > I see young troops coming back here with many of the same symptoms, a
    > different war, a different generation, many of the same problems. God
    > Bless Our Troops and their families, both have a tough time.


    Amen! Yours and ours too!


    --
    --
    https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  18. #18
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    George Shirley wrote:

    >> It's interesting that guys like this endured the horrors of war for
    >> extended periods and came back, picked up where they left off and led
    >> normal lives. Soldiers these days live with a much higher level of
    >> comfort, have a much better chance of survival and spend relatively
    >> short periods of time on deployment. They can communicate with their
    >> families by telephone and email. Yet, a high percentage of them come
    >> back claiming of post traumatic stress,even among those who aren't on
    >> the front lines.
    >>

    > Some very large differences Dave. Back then the troops had a clearly
    > defined enemy who was in uniform, mostly. Nowadays most of the enemy are
    > dressed in civilian clothing, blend in well with the surrounding
    > population and there are clearly defined rules of engagement, often
    > causing troops to take chances they shouldn't have to take.



    While it's true that the enemy soldiers were more clearly defined, there
    were still a lot of civilian casualties during the war. It was total war
    and once the battle started they poured the fire on and didn't worry a
    heck of a lot about civilians caught in the crossfire. FWIW, there were
    more civilian killed in Normandy than Allied soldiers. Air raids and
    artillery flattened a number of cities.


    > In WWII and Korea PTSD was called combat fatigue but was basically the
    > same syndrome. My eldest brother-in-law was a Navy medic assigned to the
    > USMC, he was in almost continuous battle from early 1942 until he was
    > wounded severely enough to be pulled out of battle the day before VJ
    > Day. My sister didn't get to see him until mid-1946 and he wasn't
    > discharged to go home until early 1947. He had what we used to call a
    > Section 8 discharge. He was jumpy at loud noises, very protective of
    > family, to the extent he would throw his wife and daughter on the ground
    > and cover them with his body if he heard anything resembling a gunshot
    > sound. He was a good man who died at age 61 from chronic alcoholism and
    > too many cigarettes, he died two months after being diagnosed with
    > pancreatic cancer, brought on by booze and smoking according to the
    > doctors.


    But as I said, the soldiers in WWII were overseas for a long time. They
    were sent over to England for additional training, and once the fighting
    started they were at or near the front lines until the war ended. Your
    brother in law likely saw a lot more fighting and for a much longer
    period of time than the soldiers of today.


    > I see young troops coming back here with many of the same symptoms, a
    > different war, a different generation, many of the same problems. God
    > Bless Our Troops and their families, both have a tough time.


    It is tough. There is no doubt about that. They need all the help they
    can get. They deserve it.

    BTW.... the latest issue of Canadian History Magazine (formerly "The
    Beaver") featured an article about shell shock.

  19. #19
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    Peter wrote:

    > When was the last time you were deployed to Iraq, or Afghanistan?


    Where do you think I am RIGHT NOW, moron?



    > I find it hard to stomach people, such as certain Merchant Navy persons,
    > passing themselves off as "combat veterans". It's really quite disgusting
    > that they do it.


    What's really disgusting is the cowardice shown by that Lucas guy, who
    feigned an injury to get out of military service at a young age, and who
    collects a fraudulent pension because of it.

    Bob




  20. #20
    PL Guest

    Default Re: OT Soldiers returning home surprising Familys

    George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected] :


    > In WWII and Korea PTSD was called combat fatigue but was basically the
    > same syndrome.



    Combat fatigue, battle fatigue....... during WW1 it was called
    "cowardice" and people were shot/executed because of it.

    As a Section Commander in the Infantry in the 80's, we were taught to look
    for the symptoms of "battle fatigue" in our troops.
    It wasn't till the "Pony Soldiers", 1RAR, came home from Somalia in '93
    that the diagnoses of PTSD was first used for Aussie troops. That was the
    trip that they lost Shannon McAliney who was accidentaly shot and killed
    while on patrol.




    > My eldest brother-in-law was a Navy medic assigned to the
    > USMC, he was in almost continuous battle from early 1942 until he was
    > wounded severely enough to be pulled out of battle the day before VJ
    > Day. My sister didn't get to see him until mid-1946 and he wasn't
    > discharged to go home until early 1947. He had what we used to call a
    > Section 8 discharge. He was jumpy at loud noises, very protective of
    > family, to the extent he would throw his wife and daughter on the ground
    > and cover them with his body if he heard anything resembling a gunshot
    > sound. He was a good man who died at age 61 from chronic alcoholism and
    > too many cigarettes, he died two months after being diagnosed with
    > pancreatic cancer, brought on by booze and smoking according to the
    > doctors.
    >



    A 10 part 'mini' series called "The Pacific" just finished up here last
    night.

    It was all the more poignant for the fact that it was based on real
    people, some still alive.

    It seemed, at the end, that the guys who went through the worst of it, all
    died a lot earlier than those that didn't.


    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    A good friend would drive 30 miles at 2:00 am to bail you out of jail.
    A best friend, however, would be sitting in the cell next to you saying
    "Man, that was f******n Awesome!"

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