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Thread: [OT] Mexico shames US

  1. #1
    notbob Guest

    Default [OT] Mexico shames US

    Do my eyes deceive me. Has Mexico had a law enforcement epiphany that
    will rock North America?

    "Mexico decriminalizes small-scale drug possession"

    http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...qc4vAD9A70MDO0

    I don't know where to begin. This is MONUMENTAL. Why hasn't this
    been major US news, for days, not meerely a bleep on Google, vastly
    underplayed? I'm stunned.

    I can see why Mexico would do this. They no longer have time to deal
    with the lowly street user. They are in a fight for their very
    national existence against the huge drug cartels, which threaten,
    literally, to overwhelm the govt.

    Unfortunately, until the US does the same thing, the drug cartels will
    continue to prosper and grow. It's US drug use that fuels them, not
    some campesino leading a donkey and puffing a doob. We ARE the
    problem, make no mistake.

    We desperately need the same reform here. Not only to break the back
    of the drug cartels, but to put a stop to what has become a GROWTH
    INDUSTRY! in this coutnry, namely, prisons. I believe in capitalism,
    sure, but making the detention of its own citizens a profitable
    business is beyond abhorent. It's the beginning of the end.

    It will be interesting to see where this leads. Is it a social
    experiment to see new possibilities or just a desperate survival
    tactic? Will the US even consider this revolutionary approach or has
    the law enforcement industry too tight a strangle hold.

    What say ye all?

    nb

  2. #2
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    In article <q1dkm.79442$[email protected]>,
    notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It will be interesting to see where this leads. Is it a social
    > experiment to see new possibilities or just a desperate survival
    > tactic? Will the US even consider this revolutionary approach or has
    > the law enforcement industry too tight a strangle hold.
    >
    > What say ye all?
    >
    > nb


    With Obama in charge, anything is possible.

    Remember, "Change" and all that. ;-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    Where do they stand on workplace drug-testing?

    -sw

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    On Sun, 23 Aug 2009 15:14:30 GMT, notbob wrote:

    > What say ye all?


    > The maximum amount of marijuana considered to be for "personal use"
    > under the new law is 5 grams X the equivalent of about four joints.


    More like 4 blunts (cigars). Unless it's got a *lot* of stems and
    seeds.

    > "The limit is a half gram for cocaine, the equivalent of about 4 lines."
    > ... 40 milligrams for methamphetamine


    They must snort pretty big lines as well.

    They sure do a lot of drugs down there and have built up quite an
    immunity if they have to smoke and snort that much.

    -sw

  5. #5
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    notbob wrote:
    > Do my eyes deceive me. Has Mexico had a law enforcement epiphany that
    > will rock North America?
    >
    > "Mexico decriminalizes small-scale drug possession"
    >
    > http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...qc4vAD9A70MDO0
    >
    >
    > Unfortunately, until the US does the same thing, the drug cartels will
    > continue to prosper and grow. It's US drug use that fuels them, not
    > some campesino leading a donkey and puffing a doob. We ARE the
    > problem, make no mistake.
    >
    > We desperately need the same reform here. Not only to break the back
    > of the drug cartels, but to put a stop to what has become a GROWTH
    > INDUSTRY! in this coutnry, namely, prisons. I believe in capitalism,
    > sure, but making the detention of its own citizens a profitable
    > business is beyond abhorent. It's the beginning of the end.


    >
    > What say ye all?




    Are you advocating drug use but not the sale of it? Doesn't make sense.

    If drug use/dealing is bad (yes, it is) why make it legal at any level?
    That's pretty hypocritical. I can see overlooking the user in favor of
    cracking down on the dealers who are profiting mightily, but if we could
    ever get the dealing eliminated, what then for the users?

    If there were no users, dealers would of out of business. If there were
    no dealers, then what, cold turkey for all the users you have enabled?

    gloria p

  6. #6
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    Gloria P <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected] on Aug Sun 2009 pm

    > notbob wrote:
    >> Do my eyes deceive me. Has Mexico had a law enforcement epiphany
    >> that will rock North America?
    >>
    >> "Mexico decriminalizes small-scale drug possession"
    >>
    >> http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...COzYSi8kbAUY1l
    >> LDdqc4vAD9A70MDO0
    >>
    >>
    >> Unfortunately, until the US does the same thing, the drug cartels
    >> will continue to prosper and grow. It's US drug use that fuels them,
    >> not some campesino leading a donkey and puffing a doob. We ARE the
    >> problem, make no mistake.
    >>
    >> We desperately need the same reform here. Not only to break the back
    >> of the drug cartels, but to put a stop to what has become a GROWTH
    >> INDUSTRY! in this coutnry, namely, prisons. I believe in capitalism,
    >> sure, but making the detention of its own citizens a profitable
    >> business is beyond abhorent. It's the beginning of the end.

    >
    >>
    >> What say ye all?

    >
    >
    >
    > Are you advocating drug use but not the sale of it? Doesn't make
    > sense.
    >
    > If drug use/dealing is bad (yes, it is) why make it legal at any
    > level? That's pretty hypocritical. I can see overlooking the user in
    > favor of cracking down on the dealers who are profiting mightily, but
    > if we could ever get the dealing eliminated, what then for the users?
    >
    > If there were no users, dealers would of out of business. If there
    > were no dealers, then what, cold turkey for all the users you have
    > enabled?
    >
    > gloria p
    >


    If you legalize drugs, you then can enforce trade laws as to quality and generate tax money from
    it's sales. Those taxes would more than likely be greater the the cost of the trade law enforcement.
    Plus a great deal of money could be saved in prison costs. So making things buyable at state run
    'drug' stores would seem to be a good idea.

    --
    Is that your nose, or are you eatting a banana? -Alan




  7. #7
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US


    "notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:q1dkm.79442$[email protected]..
    > Do my eyes deceive me. Has Mexico had a law enforcement epiphany that
    > will rock North America?
    >
    > "Mexico decriminalizes small-scale drug possession"
    >
    > http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...qc4vAD9A70MDO0
    >
    > I don't know where to begin. This is MONUMENTAL. Why hasn't this
    > been major US news, for days, not meerely a bleep on Google, vastly
    > underplayed? I'm stunned.



    So, a little bit of cocain is OK? Just a tad of heroin? I can agree on
    the weed, but the others are not and never should be made legal. I agree
    that the law should be going after the dealers and importers, but saying it
    is OK for users to posess some is a way for dealers to just spread out the
    inventory.


    >
    > It's US drug use that fuels them, not
    > some campesino leading a donkey and puffing a doob. We ARE the
    > problem, make no mistake.


    Yes, I agree here.


    >
    > We desperately need the same reform here. Not only to break the back
    > of the drug cartels, but to put a stop to what has become a GROWTH
    > INDUSTRY! in this coutnry, namely, prisons. I believe in capitalism,
    > sure, but making the detention of its own citizens a profitable
    > business is beyond abhorent. It's the beginning of the end.


    Agree on the prison system, but I'm not sure what you mean by breaking the
    drug cartels. Sell drugs legally in some manner?


    >
    > It will be interesting to see where this leads. Is it a social
    > experiment to see new possibilities or just a desperate survival
    > tactic? Will the US even consider this revolutionary approach or has
    > the law enforcement industry too tight a strangle hold.
    >
    > What say ye all?


    We'll never eliminate the problem of drugs, but perhaps it can be lessened
    some. What I have a problem with is making drugs like heroin readily
    available to anyone with a $5 bill. It is an addictive drug, not a
    recreational toot once a month or so to relax on Saturday night. Selling
    over the counter cheaply can start a whole generation of users that just
    wanted to give it a test drive.

    I don't know the answer but going after the top should be more of a priority
    that going after the street user. Education programs seem to be rather
    ineffective also.



  8. #8
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    On 2009-08-23, Gloria P <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Are you advocating drug use but not the sale of it? Doesn't make sense.


    I am not advocating drug use. I'm against the criminalization of it.
    There's a huge and profound difference.

    > If there were no users, dealers would of out of business. If there were
    > no dealers, then what, cold turkey for all the users you have enabled?


    You view the whole thing as right or wrong. Pointless. Subsance
    abuse is a given. As long as there are living human beings, there
    will be mind altering subtances and human beings will desire to use
    them. We must deal with the desire and need.

    Look at drinking and smoking. Smoking has been reduced to a never
    believed possible level. How? Education and social stigma. It
    freakin' kills ya, man! ...and it no longer looks cool. Same with
    alcohol and drunk driving. How? Fine
    them till they bleed! Who can afford to pay $5-10K for a first DUI?
    The 3 martini lunch --or any lunch inbibing-- is a thing of the past
    because layers started suing the crap outta any company that tolerated
    it. Yet look at alcohol use. If anything, it's up! Advertising has
    increased.

    I make no judgement on drug use, I only despise that it has become a
    criminal epidemic, precipitated by insane laws. Just as Prohibition
    created a whole new class of criminals, so have drugs. The
    prohibition of drugs is worse than the drugs. More people die from
    drug related crime than ever did from the drugs themselves.
    Prohibition has never worked and it never will.

    In the meantime, the mega pharmaceutical companies are coming out with
    mind altering drugs daily. Two page ads in magazines. They make you
    sick, rot your organs, but they make you calm in this harried world.

    It's gotta change. The way it is now is total mandness.

    (whew! ....pass me valium)

    nb



    ..

  9. #9
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    In article <KEfkm.150432$[email protected]>,
    notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I make no judgement on drug use, I only despise that it has become a
    > criminal epidemic, precipitated by insane laws. Just as Prohibition
    > created a whole new class of criminals, so have drugs. The
    > prohibition of drugs is worse than the drugs. More people die from
    > drug related crime than ever did from the drugs themselves.
    > Prohibition has never worked and it never will.
    >
    > In the meantime, the mega pharmaceutical companies are coming out with
    > mind altering drugs daily. Two page ads in magazines. They make you
    > sick, rot your organs, but they make you calm in this harried world.
    >
    > It's gotta change. The way it is now is total mandness.
    >
    > (whew! ....pass me valium)
    >
    > nb


    Nicely put Notbob.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  10. #10
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    In article <q1dkm.79442$[email protected]>,
    notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Do my eyes deceive me. Has Mexico had a law enforcement epiphany that
    > will rock North America?
    >
    > "Mexico decriminalizes small-scale drug possession"
    >
    > http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...bAUY1lLDdqc4vA
    > D9A70MDO0
    >
    > I don't know where to begin. This is MONUMENTAL. Why hasn't this
    > been major US news, for days, not meerely a bleep on Google, vastly
    > underplayed? I'm stunned.
    >
    > I can see why Mexico would do this. They no longer have time to deal
    > with the lowly street user. They are in a fight for their very
    > national existence against the huge drug cartels, which threaten,
    > literally, to overwhelm the govt.
    >
    > Unfortunately, until the US does the same thing, the drug cartels will
    > continue to prosper and grow. It's US drug use that fuels them, not
    > some campesino leading a donkey and puffing a doob. We ARE the
    > problem, make no mistake.
    >
    > We desperately need the same reform here. Not only to break the back
    > of the drug cartels, but to put a stop to what has become a GROWTH
    > INDUSTRY! in this coutnry, namely, prisons. I believe in capitalism,
    > sure, but making the detention of its own citizens a profitable
    > business is beyond abhorent. It's the beginning of the end.
    >
    > It will be interesting to see where this leads. Is it a social
    > experiment to see new possibilities or just a desperate survival
    > tactic? Will the US even consider this revolutionary approach or has
    > the law enforcement industry too tight a strangle hold.
    >
    > What say ye all?


    Don't know about the rest of the US, but in California, you get a
    prescription from your doctor. There were problems, since the DEA
    didn't recognize this as legal. Once Obama took office, I believe he
    told them to back off. I understand that some of these "prescriptions"
    were for 1 1/2 pounds.

    I believe that north of me, marijuana is the number two cash crop behind
    lumber.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  11. #11
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    On 2009-08-23, Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Don't know about the rest of the US, but in California, you get a
    > prescription from your doctor.


    C'mon Dan, I ain't been gone that long.

    I know a relative of a friend in SFBA that has a prescription, first
    and only I've met. I was shocked to see this person busting up huge
    breadstick size buds and mixing them with whole cubes of butter.
    Apparently the best way to ingest the herb. I was getting high just
    from the fumes off the buds!

    > There were problems, since the DEA didn't recognize this as legal.
    > Once Obama took office, I believe he told them to back off. I
    > understand that some of these "prescriptions" were for 1 1/2 pounds.


    After seeing this person open his bag o' buds, I'm not surprised.

    Unfortunately, this is all an anomaly and not even a minor dent in the
    overall problem.

    nb

  12. #12
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    hahabogus wrote:
    > Gloria P <[email protected]> wrote


    >>
    >> Are you advocating drug use but not the sale of it? Doesn't make
    >> sense.
    >>
    >> If drug use/dealing is bad (yes, it is) why make it legal at any
    >> level? That's pretty hypocritical.


    >> If there were no users, dealers would of out of business. If there
    >> were no dealers, then what, cold turkey for all the users you have
    >> enabled?
    >>
    >> gloria p
    >>

    >
    > If you legalize drugs, you then can enforce trade laws as to quality and generate tax money from
    > it's sales. Those taxes would more than likely be greater the the cost of the trade law enforcement.
    > Plus a great deal of money could be saved in prison costs. So making things buyable at state run
    > 'drug' stores would seem to be a good idea.
    >



    Recreational drugs aren't a good idea, period. Legalizing them
    is a terrible idea, no matter how much revenue it would generate.

    gloria p

  13. #13
    Dave Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US


    "hahabogus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 47...
    > Gloria P <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected] on Aug Sun 2009 pm
    >
    >> notbob wrote:
    >>> Do my eyes deceive me. Has Mexico had a law enforcement epiphany
    >>> that will rock North America?
    >>>
    >>> "Mexico decriminalizes small-scale drug possession"
    >>>
    >>> http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...COzYSi8kbAUY1l
    >>> LDdqc4vAD9A70MDO0
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Unfortunately, until the US does the same thing, the drug cartels
    >>> will continue to prosper and grow. It's US drug use that fuels them,
    >>> not some campesino leading a donkey and puffing a doob. We ARE the
    >>> problem, make no mistake.
    >>>
    >>> We desperately need the same reform here. Not only to break the back
    >>> of the drug cartels, but to put a stop to what has become a GROWTH
    >>> INDUSTRY! in this coutnry, namely, prisons. I believe in capitalism,
    >>> sure, but making the detention of its own citizens a profitable
    >>> business is beyond abhorent. It's the beginning of the end.

    >>
    >>>
    >>> What say ye all?

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Are you advocating drug use but not the sale of it? Doesn't make
    >> sense.
    >>
    >> If drug use/dealing is bad (yes, it is) why make it legal at any
    >> level? That's pretty hypocritical. I can see overlooking the user in
    >> favor of cracking down on the dealers who are profiting mightily, but
    >> if we could ever get the dealing eliminated, what then for the users?
    >>
    >> If there were no users, dealers would of out of business. If there
    >> were no dealers, then what, cold turkey for all the users you have
    >> enabled?
    >>
    >> gloria p
    >>

    >
    > If you legalize drugs, you then can enforce trade laws as to quality and
    > generate tax money from
    > it's sales. Those taxes would more than likely be greater the the cost of
    > the trade law enforcement.
    > Plus a great deal of money could be saved in prison costs. So making
    > things buyable at state run
    > 'drug' stores would seem to be a good idea.
    >


    They can't control the flow of drugs now, how will making them legal change
    anything?


  14. #14
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    Dave said...

    >
    > "hahabogus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] 47...
    >> Gloria P <[email protected]> wrote in
    >> news:[email protected] on Aug Sun 2009 pm
    >>
    >>> notbob wrote:
    >>>> Do my eyes deceive me. Has Mexico had a law enforcement epiphany
    >>>> that will rock North America?
    >>>>
    >>>> "Mexico decriminalizes small-scale drug possession"
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...COzYSi8kbAUY1l
    >>>> LDdqc4vAD9A70MDO0
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Unfortunately, until the US does the same thing, the drug cartels
    >>>> will continue to prosper and grow. It's US drug use that fuels them,
    >>>> not some campesino leading a donkey and puffing a doob. We ARE the
    >>>> problem, make no mistake.
    >>>>
    >>>> We desperately need the same reform here. Not only to break the back
    >>>> of the drug cartels, but to put a stop to what has become a GROWTH
    >>>> INDUSTRY! in this coutnry, namely, prisons. I believe in capitalism,
    >>>> sure, but making the detention of its own citizens a profitable
    >>>> business is beyond abhorent. It's the beginning of the end.
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> What say ye all?
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Are you advocating drug use but not the sale of it? Doesn't make
    >>> sense.
    >>>
    >>> If drug use/dealing is bad (yes, it is) why make it legal at any
    >>> level? That's pretty hypocritical. I can see overlooking the user in
    >>> favor of cracking down on the dealers who are profiting mightily, but
    >>> if we could ever get the dealing eliminated, what then for the users?
    >>>
    >>> If there were no users, dealers would of out of business. If there
    >>> were no dealers, then what, cold turkey for all the users you have
    >>> enabled?
    >>>
    >>> gloria p
    >>>

    >>
    >> If you legalize drugs, you then can enforce trade laws as to quality
    >> and generate tax money from
    >> it's sales. Those taxes would more than likely be greater the the cost
    >> of the trade law enforcement.
    >> Plus a great deal of money could be saved in prison costs. So making
    >> things buyable at state run
    >> 'drug' stores would seem to be a good idea.
    >>

    >
    > They can't control the flow of drugs now, how will making them legal
    > change anything?



    Control... age old master/slave issue. Look at the US government's wasteful
    cost of prohibition. They created a problem they could not solve.

    Now take Nixon's DEA and the futile waste of taxpayer funds and tell me
    they're worth their salt after 40 years.

    If everyone could cultivate and NOT have to buy their drugs, wouldn't that
    stop the smuggling/illicit drug trade???

    The Indians can cultivate peyote. Why can't we?

    Picture blocks of inner cities without drug pushers!

    Andy

  15. #15
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    Andy said...

    > The Indians can cultivate peyote. Why can't we?



    There's no illicit peyote smuggling trade that I know of.

    Andy

  16. #16
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    Andy wrote:
    > Andy said...
    >
    >> The Indians can cultivate peyote. Why can't we?

    >
    >
    > There's no illicit peyote smuggling trade that I know of.


    But there is for for cigarettes. The black market for pre-tax cigarettes is
    huge.

    --
    Dave
    What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan



  17. #17
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    Dave Bugg said...

    > Andy wrote:
    >> Andy said...
    >>
    >>> The Indians can cultivate peyote. Why can't we?

    >>
    >>
    >> There's no illicit peyote smuggling trade that I know of.

    >
    > But there is for for cigarettes. The black market for pre-tax cigarettes
    > is huge.



    As true as that is, that's just a cheat-the-system angle.

    Like I can buy alcohol in Delaware and save myself the 19% PA sales tax
    (issued to aid the Johnstown flood back in 1889).

    Johnstown should be a giant metropolis bigger than Los Angeles after so
    many years. But NO!!!

    And the tax continues to this very day.

    Andy
    --
    I'm no longer a danger to society.

  18. #18
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Gloria P <[email protected]> wrote:

    > hahabogus wrote:
    > > Gloria P <[email protected]> wrote

    >
    > >>
    > >> Are you advocating drug use but not the sale of it? Doesn't make
    > >> sense.
    > >>
    > >> If drug use/dealing is bad (yes, it is) why make it legal at any
    > >> level? That's pretty hypocritical.

    >
    > >> If there were no users, dealers would of out of business. If there
    > >> were no dealers, then what, cold turkey for all the users you have
    > >> enabled?
    > >>
    > >> gloria p
    > >>

    > >
    > > If you legalize drugs, you then can enforce trade laws as to quality and
    > > generate tax money from
    > > it's sales. Those taxes would more than likely be greater the the cost of
    > > the trade law enforcement.
    > > Plus a great deal of money could be saved in prison costs. So making things
    > > buyable at state run
    > > 'drug' stores would seem to be a good idea.
    > >

    >
    >
    > Recreational drugs aren't a good idea, period. Legalizing them
    > is a terrible idea, no matter how much revenue it would generate.
    >
    > gloria p


    Legalizing them would cut way back on deaths from drug related crime
    too. It's not just about revenue...
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  19. #19
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Dave" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "hahabogus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] 47...
    > > Gloria P <[email protected]> wrote in
    > > news:[email protected] on Aug Sun 2009 pm
    > >
    > >> notbob wrote:
    > >>> Do my eyes deceive me. Has Mexico had a law enforcement epiphany
    > >>> that will rock North America?
    > >>>
    > >>> "Mexico decriminalizes small-scale drug possession"
    > >>>
    > >>> http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/...COzYSi8kbAUY1l
    > >>> LDdqc4vAD9A70MDO0
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>> Unfortunately, until the US does the same thing, the drug cartels
    > >>> will continue to prosper and grow. It's US drug use that fuels them,
    > >>> not some campesino leading a donkey and puffing a doob. We ARE the
    > >>> problem, make no mistake.
    > >>>
    > >>> We desperately need the same reform here. Not only to break the back
    > >>> of the drug cartels, but to put a stop to what has become a GROWTH
    > >>> INDUSTRY! in this coutnry, namely, prisons. I believe in capitalism,
    > >>> sure, but making the detention of its own citizens a profitable
    > >>> business is beyond abhorent. It's the beginning of the end.
    > >>
    > >>>
    > >>> What say ye all?
    > >>
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> Are you advocating drug use but not the sale of it? Doesn't make
    > >> sense.
    > >>
    > >> If drug use/dealing is bad (yes, it is) why make it legal at any
    > >> level? That's pretty hypocritical. I can see overlooking the user in
    > >> favor of cracking down on the dealers who are profiting mightily, but
    > >> if we could ever get the dealing eliminated, what then for the users?
    > >>
    > >> If there were no users, dealers would of out of business. If there
    > >> were no dealers, then what, cold turkey for all the users you have
    > >> enabled?
    > >>
    > >> gloria p
    > >>

    > >
    > > If you legalize drugs, you then can enforce trade laws as to quality and
    > > generate tax money from
    > > it's sales. Those taxes would more than likely be greater the the cost of
    > > the trade law enforcement.
    > > Plus a great deal of money could be saved in prison costs. So making
    > > things buyable at state run
    > > 'drug' stores would seem to be a good idea.
    > >

    >
    > They can't control the flow of drugs now, how will making them legal change
    > anything?


    By removing the profit margin...
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

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  20. #20
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: [OT] Mexico shames US

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Dave Bugg" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Andy wrote:
    > > Andy said...
    > >
    > >> The Indians can cultivate peyote. Why can't we?

    > >
    > >
    > > There's no illicit peyote smuggling trade that I know of.

    >
    > But there is for for cigarettes. The black market for pre-tax cigarettes is
    > huge.


    That's because of heavy taxation. ;-)
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

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