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Thread: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

  1. #1
    Andy Guest

    Default OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    Adding Abilefy can help...

    .... side effects could result in suicide OR death!

    ???

    Heck, I'd be happier just staying depressed!!!

    Geez...

    The magic of modern TV medicine. Where are the TV attorneys, getting me
    $millions for taking such crap on top of crap?!?

    Andy

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 10:20:13 -0600, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...
    >
    > Adding Abilefy can help...
    >
    > ... side effects could result in suicide OR death!
    >
    > ???
    >
    > Heck, I'd be happier just staying depressed!!!
    >
    > Geez...
    >
    > The magic of modern TV medicine. Where are the TV attorneys, getting me
    > $millions for taking such crap on top of crap?!?
    >

    The one we have out here is for a new gout medication. In a list of
    side effects as long as your arm are the possibility of gout attacks
    and heart attacks. The ads seem to be one big warning, not a
    beaconing - I would never ask my doctor to consider that medication if
    I had gout.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  3. #3
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 10:20:13 -0600, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...
    >>
    >> Adding Abilefy can help...
    >>
    >> ... side effects could result in suicide OR death!
    >>
    >> ???
    >>
    >> Heck, I'd be happier just staying depressed!!!
    >>
    >> Geez...
    >>
    >> The magic of modern TV medicine. Where are the TV attorneys, getting

    me
    >> $millions for taking such crap on top of crap?!?
    >>

    > The one we have out here is for a new gout medication. In a list of
    > side effects as long as your arm are the possibility of gout attacks
    > and heart attacks. The ads seem to be one big warning, not a
    > beaconing - I would never ask my doctor to consider that medication if
    > I had gout.



    sf,

    Uloric! My good friend in CA just sent me an email about the stuff. I'm
    not too anxious at the moment. I've been doing OK.

    Best,

    Andy

  4. #4
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    Andy wrote:
    > OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...
    >
    > Adding Abilefy can help...
    >
    > ... side effects could result in suicide OR death!
    >
    > ???
    >
    > Heck, I'd be happier just staying depressed!!!
    >
    > Geez...
    >
    > The magic of modern TV medicine. Where are the TV attorneys, getting me
    > $millions for taking such crap on top of crap?!?
    >
    > Andy



    It could just be a seasonal vitamin D deficiency due to the lack of
    sunlight in the winter. So take a daily spoonful of cod liver oil
    starting about 2 months after the fall equinox until a month before
    the spring equinox. (yuck. Might be easier to just shoot oneself)

    Bob

  5. #5
    BlueBrooke Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 10:20:13 -0600, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...
    >
    >Adding Abilefy can help...
    >
    >... side effects could result in suicide OR death!
    >
    >???
    >
    >Heck, I'd be happier just staying depressed!!!
    >
    >Geez...
    >
    >The magic of modern TV medicine. Where are the TV attorneys, getting me
    >$millions for taking such crap on top of crap?!?
    >
    >Andy


    Ah -- but the first thing to get your attention about those
    commercials is that these "still depressed" people are *already* on
    meds. So, basically, they're saying, "Drugs not working?! Take MORE
    pills!"

    :-)

  6. #6
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    BlueBrooke wrote:
    > On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 10:20:13 -0600, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...
    >>
    >> Adding Abilefy can help...
    >>
    >> ... side effects could result in suicide OR death!
    >>
    >> ???
    >>
    >> Heck, I'd be happier just staying depressed!!!
    >>
    >> Geez...
    >>
    >> The magic of modern TV medicine. Where are the TV attorneys, getting me
    >> $millions for taking such crap on top of crap?!?
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    > Ah -- but the first thing to get your attention about those
    > commercials is that these "still depressed" people are *already* on
    > meds. So, basically, they're saying, "Drugs not working?! Take MORE
    > pills!"
    >
    > :-)



    The "Sad Clarinet" music and the whiny-voiced announcer in Cymbalta
    (sp?) commercials are enough to *make* people depressed.

    Bob

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 11:22:06 -0600, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 10:20:13 -0600, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...
    > >>
    > >> Adding Abilefy can help...
    > >>
    > >> ... side effects could result in suicide OR death!
    > >>
    > >> ???
    > >>
    > >> Heck, I'd be happier just staying depressed!!!
    > >>
    > >> Geez...
    > >>
    > >> The magic of modern TV medicine. Where are the TV attorneys, getting

    > me
    > >> $millions for taking such crap on top of crap?!?
    > >>

    > > The one we have out here is for a new gout medication. In a list of
    > > side effects as long as your arm are the possibility of gout attacks
    > > and heart attacks. The ads seem to be one big warning, not a
    > > beaconing - I would never ask my doctor to consider that medication if
    > > I had gout.

    >
    >
    > sf,
    >
    > Uloric! My good friend in CA just sent me an email about the stuff. I'm
    > not too anxious at the moment. I've been doing OK.
    >

    That's the one. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQwE-kfnuvg
    My husband recently had a mini-bout with gout and he'd been good - no
    alcohol, no shellfish, no red meat. So, he's softening his position
    on no more daily pills.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 12:24:09 -0600, zxcvbob <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > It could just be a seasonal vitamin D deficiency due to the lack of
    > sunlight in the winter. So take a daily spoonful of cod liver oil
    > starting about 2 months after the fall equinox until a month before
    > the spring equinox. (yuck. Might be easier to just shoot oneself)


    You don't have to taste it anymore. Cod liver oil comes in pill form
    now.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  9. #9
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    > OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...
    >
    > Adding Abilefy can help...
    >
    > ... side effects could result in suicide OR death!
    >
    > ???
    >
    > Heck, I'd be happier just staying depressed!!!
    >
    > Geez...
    >
    > The magic of modern TV medicine. Where are the TV attorneys, getting me
    > $millions for taking such crap on top of crap?!?
    >
    > Andy



    Best side effects commercial EVER.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0o33tZfqF_M

    Dimitri

  10. #10
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    > OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...


    <snip>

    > Andy


    At a time in my life I was chatting with my doctor and could not decide if I
    was depressed or realistic.

    Dimitri



  11. #11
    Christopher Helms Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    On Nov 15, 10:20*am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    > OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...
    >
    > Adding Abilefy can help...
    >
    > ... side effects could result in suicide OR death!



    Oh, that's nothing. Check this out. And Remeron is one of your milder
    anti-depressant, anti anxiety pills.


    Remeron Side Effects
    Generic Name: mirtazapine

    Please note - some side effects for Remeron may not be reported.
    Always consult your doctor or healthcare specialist for medical
    advice. You may also report side effects to the FDA at http://www.fda.gov/medwatch/
    or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088).


    Side Effects of Remeron - for the Consumer

    Remeron
    All medicines may cause side effects, but many people have no, or
    minor, side effects. Check with your doctor if any of these most
    COMMON side effects persist or become bothersome when using Remeron:

    Abnormal dreams; abnormal thinking; constipation; dizziness;
    drowsiness; dry mouth; flu symptoms; increased appetite; weakness;
    weight gain.

    Seek medical attention right away if any of these SEVERE side effects
    occur when using Remeron:
    Severe allergic reactions (rash; hives; itching; difficulty breathing;
    tightness in the chest; swelling of the mouth, face, lips, or tongue);
    mouth sores; new or worsening agitation, panic attacks,
    aggressiveness, impulsiveness, irritability, hostility, exaggerated
    feeling of well-being, trouble sleeping, restlessness, or inability to
    sit still; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin; seizures; severe
    headache or dizziness; sluggishness; suicidal thoughts or actions;
    symptoms of infection (eg, fever, chills, sore throat); tremors;
    unusual or severe mental or mood changes; worsening of depression.


    Remeron Side Effects - for the Professional

    Remeron
    Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment
    Approximately 16% of the 453 patients who received Remeron®
    (mirtazapine) Tablets in US 6-week controlled clinical trials
    discontinued treatment due to an adverse experience, compared to 7% of
    the 361 placebo-treated patients in those studies. The most common
    events (≥1%) associated with discontinuation and considered to be drug
    related (i.e., those events associated with dropout at a rate at least
    twice that of placebo) included:

    Common Adverse Events Associated with Discontinuation of Treatment in
    6-Week US Remeron Trials
    Adverse Event Percentage of Patients Discontinuing with Adverse Event
    Remeron
    (n=453) Placebo
    (n=361)
    Somnolence 10.4% 2.2%
    Nausea 1.5% 0%
    Commonly Observed Adverse Events in US Controlled Clinical Trials
    The most commonly observed adverse events associated with the use of
    Remeron (mirtazapine) Tablets (incidence of 5% or greater) and not
    observed at an equivalent incidence among placebo-treated patients
    (Remeron incidence at least twice that for placebo) were:

    Common Treatment-Emergent Adverse Events Associated with the Use of
    Remeron in 6-Week US Trials
    Adverse Event Percentage of Patients Reporting Adverse Event
    Remeron
    (n=453) Placebo
    (n=361)
    Somnolence 54% 18%
    Increased Appetite 17% 2%
    Weight Gain 12% 2%
    Dizziness 7% 3%
    Adverse Events Occurring at an Incidence of 1% or More Among Remeron-
    Treated Patients
    The table that follows enumerates adverse events that occurred at an
    incidence of 1% or more, and were more frequent than in the placebo
    group, among Remeron (mirtazapine) Tablets-treated patients who
    participated in short-term US placebo-controlled trials in which
    patients were dosed in a range of 5 to 60 mg/day. This table shows the
    percentage of patients in each group who had at least 1 episode of an
    event at some time during their treatment. Reported adverse events
    were classified using a standard COSTART-based dictionary terminology.

    The prescriber should be aware that these figures cannot be used to
    predict the incidence of side effects in the course of usual medical
    practice where patient characteristics and other factors differ from
    those which prevailed in the clinical trials. Similarly, the cited
    frequencies cannot be compared with figures obtained from other
    investigations involving different treatments, uses, and
    investigators. The cited figures, however, do provide the prescribing
    physician with some basis for estimating the relative contribution of
    drug and nondrug factors to the side-effect incidence rate in the
    population studied.

    INCIDENCE OF ADVERSE CLINICAL EXPERIENCES* (≥1%) IN SHORT-TERM US
    CONTROLLED STUDIES
    Body System
    Adverse Clinical Experience Remeron
    (n=453) Placebo
    (n=361)
    *
    Events reported by at least 1% of patients treated with Remeron are
    included, except the following events which had an incidence on
    placebo greater than or equal to Remeron: headache, infection, pain,
    chest pain, palpitation, tachycardia, postural hypotension, nausea,
    dyspepsia, diarrhea, flatulence, insomnia, nervousness, libido
    decreased, hypertonia, pharyngitis, rhinitis, sweating, amblyopia,
    tinnitus, taste perversion.
    Body as a Whole
    Asthenia 8% 5%
    Flu Syndrome 5% 3%
    Back Pain 2% 1%
    Digestive System
    Dry Mouth 25% 15%
    Increased Appetite 17% 2%
    Constipation 13% 7%
    Metabolic and Nutritional Disorders
    Weight Gain 12% 2%
    Peripheral Edema 2% 1%
    Edema 1% 0%
    Musculoskeletal System
    Myalgia 2% 1%
    Nervous System
    Somnolence 54% 18%
    Dizziness 7% 3%
    Abnormal Dreams 4% 1%
    Thinking Abnormal 3% 1%
    Tremor 2% 1%
    Confusion 2% 0%
    Respiratory System
    Dyspnea 1% 0%
    Urogenital System
    Urinary Frequency 2% 1%
    ECG Changes
    The electrocardiograms for 338 patients who received Remeron
    (mirtazapine) Tablets and 261 patients who received placebo in 6-week,
    placebo-controlled trials were analyzed. Prolongation in QTc ≥500 msec
    was not observed among mirtazapine-treated patients; mean change in
    QTc was +1.6 msec for mirtazapine and –3.1 msec for placebo.
    Mirtazapine was associated with a mean increase in heart rate of 3.4
    bpm, compared to 0.8 bpm for placebo. The clinical significance of
    these changes is unknown.

    Other Adverse Events Observed During the Premarketing Evaluation of
    Remeron
    During its premarketing assessment, multiple doses of Remeron
    (mirtazapine) Tablets were administered to 2796 patients in clinical
    studies. The conditions and duration of exposure to mirtazapine varied
    greatly, and included (in overlapping categories) open and double-
    blind studies, uncontrolled and controlled studies, inpatient and
    outpatient studies, fixed-dose and titration studies. Untoward events
    associated with this exposure were recorded by clinical investigators
    using terminology of their own choosing. Consequently, it is not
    possible to provide a meaningful estimate of the proportion of
    individuals experiencing adverse events without first grouping similar
    types of untoward events into a smaller number of standardized event
    categories.

    In the tabulations that follow, reported adverse events were
    classified using a standard COSTART-based dictionary terminology. The
    frequencies presented, therefore, represent the proportion of the 2796
    patients exposed to multiple doses of Remeron who experienced an event
    of the type cited on at least 1 occasion while receiving Remeron. All
    reported events are included except those already listed in the
    previous table, those adverse experiences subsumed under COSTART terms
    that are either overly general or excessively specific so as to be
    uninformative, and those events for which a drug cause was very
    remote. It is important to emphasize that, although the events
    reported occurred during treatment with Remeron, they were not
    necessarily caused by it.

    Events are further categorized by body system and listed in order of
    decreasing frequency according to the following definitions: frequent
    adverse events are those occurring on 1 or more occasions in at least
    1/100 patients; infrequent adverse events are those occurring in 1/100
    to 1/1000 patients; rare events are those occurring in fewer than
    1/1000 patients. Only those events not already listed in the previous
    table appear in this listing. Events of major clinical importance are
    also described in the WARNINGS and PRECAUTIONS sections.

    Body as a Whole: frequent: malaise, abdominal pain, abdominal syndrome
    acute; infrequent: chills, fever, face edema, ulcer, photosensitivity
    reaction, neck rigidity, neck pain, abdomen enlarged; rare:
    cellulitis, chest pain substernal.

    Cardiovascular System: frequent: hypertension, vasodilatation;
    infrequent: angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, bradycardia,
    ventricular extrasystoles, syncope, migraine, hypotension; rare:
    atrial arrhythmia, bigeminy, vascular headache, pulmonary embolus,
    cerebral ischemia, cardiomegaly, phlebitis, left heart failure.

    Digestive System: frequent: vomiting, anorexia; infrequent:
    eructation, glossitis, cholecystitis, nausea and vomiting, gum
    hemorrhage, stomatitis, colitis, liver function tests abnormal; rare:
    tongue discoloration, ulcerative stomatitis, salivary gland
    enlargement, increased salivation, intestinal obstruction,
    pancreatitis, aphthous stomatitis, cirrhosis of liver, gastritis,
    gastroenteritis, oral moniliasis, tongue edema.

    Endocrine System: rare: goiter, hypothyroidism.

    Hemic and Lymphatic System: rare: lymphadenopathy, leukopenia,
    petechia, anemia, thrombocytopenia, lymphocytosis, pancytopenia.

    Metabolic and Nutritional Disorders: frequent: thirst; infrequent:
    dehydration, weight loss; rare: gout, SGOT increased, healing
    abnormal, acid phosphatase increased, SGPT increased, diabetes
    mellitus, hyponatremia.

    Musculoskeletal System: frequent: myasthenia, arthralgia; infrequent:
    arthritis, tenosynovitis; rare: pathologic fracture, osteoporosis
    fracture, bone pain, myositis, tendon rupture, arthrosis, bursitis.

    Nervous System: frequent: hypesthesia, apathy, depression,
    hypokinesia, vertigo, twitching, agitation, anxiety, amnesia,
    hyperkinesia, paresthesia; infrequent: ataxia, delirium, delusions,
    depersonalization, dyskinesia, extrapyramidal syndrome, libido
    increased, coordination abnormal, dysarthria, hallucinations, manic
    reaction, neurosis, dystonia, hostility, reflexes increased, emotional
    lability, euphoria, paranoid reaction; rare: aphasia, nystagmus,
    akathisia (psychomotor restlessness), stupor, dementia, diplopia, drug
    dependence, paralysis, grand mal convulsion, hypotonia, myoclonus,
    psychotic depression, withdrawal syndrome, serotonin syndrome.

    Respiratory System: frequent: cough increased, sinusitis; infrequent:
    epistaxis, bronchitis, asthma, pneumonia; rare: asphyxia, laryngitis,
    pneumothorax, hiccup.

    Skin and Appendages: frequent: pruritus, rash; infrequent: acne,
    exfoliative dermatitis, dry skin, herpes simplex, alopecia; rare:
    urticaria, herpes zoster, skin hypertrophy, seborrhea, skin ulcer.

    Special Senses: infrequent: eye pain, abnormality of accommodation,
    conjunctivitis, deafness, keratoconjunctivitis, lacrimation disorder,
    glaucoma, hyperacusis, ear pain; rare: blepharitis, partial transitory
    deafness, otitis media, taste loss, parosmia.

    Urogenital System: frequent: urinary tract infection; infrequent:
    kidney calculus, cystitis, dysuria, urinary incontinence, urinary
    retention, vaginitis, hematuria, breast pain, amenorrhea,
    dysmenorrhea, leukorrhea, impotence; rare: polyuria, urethritis,
    metrorrhagia, menorrhagia, abnormal ejaculation, breast engorgement,
    breast enlargement, urinary urgency.

    Other Adverse Events Observed During Postmarketing Evaluation of
    Remeron
    Adverse events reported since market introduction, which were
    temporally (but not necessarily causally) related to mirtazapine
    therapy, include 4 cases of the ventricular arrhythmia torsades de
    pointes. In 3 of the 4 cases, however, concomitant drugs were
    implicated. All patients recovered.

    Cases of severe skin reactions, including Stevens-Johnson Syndrome,
    bullous dermatitis, erythema multiforme and toxic epidermal necrolysis
    have also been reported.

    Top
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    Side Effects by Body System

    Nervous system
    Although the exact incidence has not been reported, paresthesia
    appears to be a relatively common side effect of mirtazapine. Patients
    typically experience paresthesia in the extremities or generalized in
    the body. However, several cases of oral paresthesia associated with
    the orally disintegrating tablet have been reported. Patients have
    described a sensation of swelling in the mouth, numbness, and
    anesthesia. The symptoms occur shortly after ingestion and resolve
    after a few hours.

    Nearly all selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, mixed serotonin/
    norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and tricyclic antidepressants
    cause sleep abnormalities to some extent. These antidepressants have
    marked dose-dependent effects on rapid eye movement (REM) sleep,
    causing reductions in the overall amount of REM sleep over the night
    and delays the first entry into REM sleep (increased REM sleep onset
    latency (ROL)), both in healthy subjects and depressed patients. The
    antidepressants that increase serotonin function appear to have the
    greatest effect on REM sleep. The reduction in REM sleep is greatest
    early in treatment, but gradually returns towards baseline during long-
    term therapy; however, ROL remains long. Following discontinuation of
    therapy the amount of REM sleep tends to rebound. Some of these drugs
    (i.e., bupropion, mirtazapine, nefazodone, trazodone, trimipramine)
    appear to have a modest or minimal effect on REM sleep.

    Nervous system side effects including somnolence (56%), headache
    (12%), dizziness (7% to 12%), insomnia (8%), abnormal dreams (4%),
    abnormal thinking (3%), confusion (2%), tremor (2%), sleep
    abnormalities, and paresthesia have been reported. Activation of mania
    and seizures have occurred rarely. One case of seizures, one case of
    akathisia, and one patient with a transient ischemic attack have also
    been reported.

    Gastrointestinal
    Gastrointestinal side effects including dry mouth (25%), increased
    appetite (17%), and constipation (13%) have been reported. Other
    reported gastrointestinal adverse effects have included diarrhea (9%),
    nausea (4%), vomiting, anorexia, cholecystitis, glossitis, and
    colitis. One case of subclinical pancreatitis has also been reported.

    Metabolic
    Metabolic side effects have been reported. Nonfasting triglyceride
    increases to greater than 20% above the normal upper limits have been
    reported in 15% of patients receiving mirtazapine in clinical trials.
    Weight gain has been reported in 12% of patients. Less frequently
    reported were peripheral edema (2%), thirst, and weight loss. In one
    small study, mirtazapine appeared to improve glucose tolerance by
    reducing cortisol secretion.

    Musculoskeletal
    Musculoskeletal side effects including myalgia, arthralgia (2.4%), and
    myasthenia have been reported in less than 2% of patients receiving
    mirtazapine.

    Numerous cases of mirtazapine- induced arthralgia have been reported.
    Symptoms tend to appear within 2 to 22 days of starting mirtazapine
    and resolve shortly after discontinuation of treatment.

    Hepatic
    Hepatic side effects including liver function test abnormalities
    (primarily ALT (SGPT) elevations greater than three times normal
    concentrations) have been reported in 2% of patients receiving
    mirtazapine. Patients typically did not develop signs or symptoms of
    hepatic dysfunction

    A case of mirtazapine- associated, dose-dependent asymptomatic
    elevation of liver enzymes has been reported. In this patient,
    elevated liver enzymes were discovered 3 months after starting
    mirtazapine (30 mg/day) and following a dose reduction (15 mg/day)
    liver enzymes decreased, but remained above normal. Liver enzymes
    returned to normal 2 months after discontinuation of mirtazapine.

    Respiratory
    Respiratory side effects including dyspnea (1%) have been reported.

    Cardiovascular
    Cardiovascular side effects including hypertension, vasodilation,
    angina pectoris, bradycardia, and ventricular extrasystoles have been
    reported infrequently.

    Tachycardia, palpitation, chest pain, and postural hypotension were
    reported by at least 1% of patients in clinical trials, however, the
    incidence was less than that of placebo. ECG changes were also noted
    in 3% of patients. The incidence was similar to that of placebo and
    the changes were not considered clinically significant.

    Hematologic
    Coagulopathy (i.e., ecchymosis) developed in a patient three days
    after initiating mirtazapine therapy (30 mg/day). Following
    discontinuation of mirtazapine, prothrombin time, activated partial
    thromboplastin time, and international normalized ratio returned to
    normal and symptoms of ecchymosis disappeared.

    Hematologic and lymphatic side effects such as lymphadenopathy,
    leukopenia, anemia, petechiae, thrombocytopenia, lymphocytosis, and
    pancytopenia have been reported but are uncommon. Agranulocytosis
    occurred in two patients and neutropenia in one patient during
    premarketing clinical trials. One case of coagulopathy has been
    reported.

    Dermatologic
    Dermatologic side effects including pruritus, rash, acne, dry skin,
    and alopecia have been reported infrequently. Postmarketing cases of
    severe skin reactions, including Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, bullous
    dermatitis, erythema multiforme and toxic epidermal necrolysis have
    also been reported.

    General
    General side effects have included asthenia (8%), flu syndrome (5%),
    and back pain (2%).

    Ocular
    Ocular side effects including eye pain, abnormality of accommodation,
    conjunctivitis, lacrimation, and glaucoma have been reported
    infrequently. A case of palinopsia has also been recorded.

    Genitourinary
    Genitourinary side effects including urinary frequency (2%), urinary
    tract infection, kidney calculus, cystitis, urinary incontinence,
    vaginitis, hematuria, impotence, and polyuria have been reported.

    Top
    More Remeron resources

    Remeron Monograph (AHFS DI)
    Remeron Prescribing Information (FDA)
    Remeron Consumer Overview
    Remeron Advanced Consumer (Micromedex) - Includes Dosage Information
    Remeron MedFacts Consumer Leaflet (Wolters Kluwer)
    Mirtazapine Professional Patient Advice (Wolters Kluwer)
    Remeron SolTab Orally Disintegrating Tablets MedFacts Consumer Leaflet
    (Wolters Kluwer)
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    Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information
    provided is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is
    made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained
    herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference
    resource beyond the date hereof. This information does not endorse
    drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. This drug information
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  12. #12
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    sf wrote on Mon, 15 Nov 2010 11:25:03 -0800:

    >> It could just be a seasonal vitamin D deficiency due to the
    >> lack of sunlight in the winter. So take a daily spoonful of
    >> cod liver oil starting about 2 months after the fall equinox
    >> until a month before the spring equinox. (yuck. Might be
    >> easier to just shoot oneself)


    > You don't have to taste it anymore. Cod liver oil comes in
    > pill form now.


    The gelatin capsule was introduced for fish oils in the late 1940's.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not

  13. #13
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...
    >>
    >> Adding Abilefy can help...
    >>
    >> ... side effects could result in suicide OR death!
    >>
    >> ???
    >>
    >> Heck, I'd be happier just staying depressed!!!
    >>
    >> Geez...
    >>
    >> The magic of modern TV medicine. Where are the TV attorneys, getting
    >> me $millions for taking such crap on top of crap?!?
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    >
    > Best side effects commercial EVER.
    >
    > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0o33tZfqF_M
    >
    > Dimitri



    Dimitri,

    LOLOLOL!!!

    "Seeing the dead!"

    Thanks,

    Andy
    LOL!

  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 14:56:18 -0500, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf wrote on Mon, 15 Nov 2010 11:25:03 -0800:
    >
    > >> It could just be a seasonal vitamin D deficiency due to the
    > >> lack of sunlight in the winter. So take a daily spoonful of
    > >> cod liver oil starting about 2 months after the fall equinox
    > >> until a month before the spring equinox. (yuck. Might be
    > >> easier to just shoot oneself)

    >
    > > You don't have to taste it anymore. Cod liver oil comes in
    > > pill form now.

    >
    > The gelatin capsule was introduced for fish oils in the late 1940's.


    You can't prove it by my experience.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  15. #15
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    sf wrote:
    > On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 12:24:09 -0600, zxcvbob <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> It could just be a seasonal vitamin D deficiency due to the lack of
    >> sunlight in the winter. So take a daily spoonful of cod liver oil
    >> starting about 2 months after the fall equinox until a month before
    >> the spring equinox. (yuck. Might be easier to just shoot oneself)

    >
    > You don't have to taste it anymore. Cod liver oil comes in pill form
    > now.
    >



    I think if I blend it into my banana-berry or peach-apricot protein
    shake in the morning, I won't taste it. But I'm afraid to test that
    theory...

    Bob

  16. #16
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    On Nov 15, 12:29*pm, BlueBrooke <bluebro...@invalid.invalid> wrote:
    > On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 10:20:13 -0600, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    > >OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    >
    > >Adding Abilefy can help...

    >
    > >... side effects could result in suicide OR death!

    >
    > >???

    >
    > >Heck, I'd be happier just staying depressed!!!

    >
    > >Geez...

    >
    > >The magic of modern TV medicine. Where are the TV attorneys, getting me
    > >$millions for taking such crap on top of crap?!?

    >
    > >Andy

    >
    > Ah -- but the first thing to get your attention about those
    > commercials is that these "still depressed" people are *already* on
    > meds. *So, basically, they're saying, "Drugs not working?! *Take MORE
    > pills!" *
    >
    > :-) *


    It worked in high school.

    --Bryan

  17. #17
    Steve B Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...


    >> ... side effects could result in suicide OR death!


    I just love those lists of side effects done by those guys who talk so fast
    you get every sixth word ............. spontaneous testicular explosion
    ...................... limbs falling off .................... blindness
    ...................... total paralysis ............... brain hemorrhaging
    .................... loss of one or more senses ..................... intense
    offensive body odor .......................

    But, Gawd, those commercials look pretty.

    Steve

    Heart surgery pending?
    Read up and prepare.
    Learn how to care for a friend.
    http://cabgbypasssurgery.com



  18. #18
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...


    sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 12:24:09 -0600, zxcvbob <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> It could just be a seasonal vitamin D deficiency due to the lack of
    >> sunlight in the winter. So take a daily spoonful of cod liver oil
    >> starting about 2 months after the fall equinox until a month before
    >> the spring equinox. (yuck. Might be easier to just shoot oneself)

    >
    > You don't have to taste it anymore. Cod liver oil comes in pill form
    > now.


    So does pure vitamin D. Screw the oil, in any form.



  19. #19
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    In article <ic1i4d$nai$[email protected]>,
    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 12:24:09 -0600, zxcvbob <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> It could just be a seasonal vitamin D deficiency due to the lack of
    > >> sunlight in the winter. So take a daily spoonful of cod liver oil
    > >> starting about 2 months after the fall equinox until a month before
    > >> the spring equinox. (yuck. Might be easier to just shoot oneself)

    > >
    > > You don't have to taste it anymore. Cod liver oil comes in pill form
    > > now.

    >
    > So does pure vitamin D. Screw the oil, in any form.


    I'm not too keen on taking vitamin supplements. I'd rather get my
    nutrition by eating food. Still, I spend about US$10 each year on a
    bottle of 365 tablets of 100% of all the common vitamins. I just
    checked, and "D" is in there. That's about US$.03 per day. That's
    pretty cheap insurance.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  20. #20
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...

    In article <8kdd4fFi7dU1[email protected]>, [email protected]
    says...
    >
    > BlueBrooke wrote:
    > > On Mon, 15 Nov 2010 10:20:13 -0600, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> OT: If you're depressed and still depressed...
    > >>
    > >> Adding Abilefy can help...
    > >>
    > >> ... side effects could result in suicide OR death!
    > >>
    > >> ???
    > >>
    > >> Heck, I'd be happier just staying depressed!!!
    > >>
    > >> Geez...
    > >>
    > >> The magic of modern TV medicine. Where are the TV attorneys, getting me
    > >> $millions for taking such crap on top of crap?!?
    > >>
    > >> Andy

    > >
    > > Ah -- but the first thing to get your attention about those
    > > commercials is that these "still depressed" people are *already* on
    > > meds. So, basically, they're saying, "Drugs not working?! Take MORE
    > > pills!"
    > >
    > > :-)

    >
    >
    > The "Sad Clarinet" music and the whiny-voiced announcer in Cymbalta
    > (sp?) commercials are enough to *make* people depressed.


    Maybe there's a Hannibal Lecter out there who it will make hungry
    instead. One can hope anyway.
    >
    > Bob




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