Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: OT: Fun with Corelle dinnerware

  1. #1
    Andy Guest

    Default OT: Fun with Corelle dinnerware

    OT: Fun with Corelle dinnerware

    On "How It's Made" TV show there was a segment on the manufacture of Corelle
    dinnerware.

    It really was an enjoyable piece on the assembly line of the brand. I know
    I'm easily amused but I'd always wanted to know how the stuff is made and
    today I got my answer.

    From raw ingredients to finished plates, bowls, etc. All run by robots. The
    only human hand was a person in final inspection who's job is the 6 foot drop
    test inspector, once for each run. I guess robots aren't smart or enabled
    enough to sweep up broken dishes...

    Andy
    --
    "I only know what I read, not what I'm talking about!"
    --Andy


  2. #2
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Fun with Corelle dinnerware


    "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    > OT: Fun with Corelle dinnerware
    >
    > On "How It's Made" TV show there was a segment on the manufacture of
    > Corelle
    > dinnerware.
    >
    > It really was an enjoyable piece on the assembly line of the brand. I know
    > I'm easily amused but I'd always wanted to know how the stuff is made and
    > today I got my answer.
    >
    > From raw ingredients to finished plates, bowls, etc. All run by robots.
    > The
    > only human hand was a person in final inspection who's job is the 6 foot
    > drop
    > test inspector, once for each run. I guess robots aren't smart or enabled
    > enough to sweep up broken dishes...
    >
    > Andy
    > --
    > "I only know what I read, not what I'm talking about!"
    > --Andy
    >


    One of my favorite shows. Amazing just how tough that stuff is. I've been
    inside a couple of glass plants and while the raw material is cheap, it
    takes a lot of expensive automated machinery to make the huge volumes of
    pieces to make the end product cheap.



  3. #3
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Fun with Corelle dinnerware

    On Mon 15 Jun 2009 07:37:38p, Ed Pawlowski told us...

    >
    > "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> OT: Fun with Corelle dinnerware
    >>
    >> On "How It's Made" TV show there was a segment on the manufacture of
    >> Corelle
    >> dinnerware.
    >>
    >> It really was an enjoyable piece on the assembly line of the brand. I
    >> know I'm easily amused but I'd always wanted to know how the stuff is
    >> made and today I got my answer.
    >>
    >> From raw ingredients to finished plates, bowls, etc. All run by robots.
    >> The
    >> only human hand was a person in final inspection who's job is the 6
    >> foot drop test inspector, once for each run. I guess robots aren't
    >> smart or enabled enough to sweep up broken dishes...
    >>
    >> Andy
    >> --
    >> "I only know what I read, not what I'm talking about!" --Andy
    >>

    >
    > One of my favorite shows. Amazing just how tough that stuff is. I've
    > been inside a couple of glass plants and while the raw material is
    > cheap, it takes a lot of expensive automated machinery to make the huge
    > volumes of pieces to make the end product cheap.


    Some of David's family lived near Williamstown, W. Va., home of Fenton
    Glass. Every time we visited there we went to the factory store where you
    could buy items that never hit the general market. We toured the plant
    several times, as they were always retooling for producing different items
    and the equipment was fascinating. Despite the equipment, there was a lot
    of hand work involved as well.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    My soul is dark with stormy riot, Directly traceable to diet.
    ~Samuel Hoffenstein




  4. #4
    George Guest

    Default Re: Fun with Corelle dinnerware

    Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    > "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    >> OT: Fun with Corelle dinnerware
    >>
    >> On "How It's Made" TV show there was a segment on the manufacture of
    >> Corelle
    >> dinnerware.
    >>
    >> It really was an enjoyable piece on the assembly line of the brand. I know
    >> I'm easily amused but I'd always wanted to know how the stuff is made and
    >> today I got my answer.
    >>
    >> From raw ingredients to finished plates, bowls, etc. All run by robots.
    >> The
    >> only human hand was a person in final inspection who's job is the 6 foot
    >> drop
    >> test inspector, once for each run. I guess robots aren't smart or enabled
    >> enough to sweep up broken dishes...
    >>
    >> Andy
    >> --
    >> "I only know what I read, not what I'm talking about!"
    >> --Andy
    >>

    >
    > One of my favorite shows. Amazing just how tough that stuff is. I've been
    > inside a couple of glass plants and while the raw material is cheap, it
    > takes a lot of expensive automated machinery to make the huge volumes of
    > pieces to make the end product cheap.
    >
    >

    Me too. I am always amazed at how much info companies give away about
    their processes. I visit a number of interesting plants and in a couple
    I had to sign an NDA. Cameras aren't allowed on the property. In one
    place they have a very intricate process that took years to perfect.
    Visitors are only allowed in that area with an escort and only if they
    actually need to be there. One day I was watching "How it's Made" and
    there they are in the secure area of that plant explaining how
    everything works.

  5. #5
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Fun with Corelle dinnerware

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > Some of David's family lived near Williamstown, W. Va., home of Fenton
    > Glass. Every time we visited there we went to the factory store where you
    > could buy items that never hit the general market. We toured the plant
    > several times, as they were always retooling for producing different items
    > and the equipment was fascinating. Despite the equipment, there was a lot
    > of hand work involved as well.
    >


    We toured Fenton Glass a few years ago. Found that about 80% of what
    they were making was exclusive for QVC, the TV shopping thing.

    There are many wonderful glassworks in that part of WV. We visited at
    least 5 of them, including one place that makes the glass for stained
    glass windows.
    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  6. #6
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Fun with Corelle dinnerware

    George wrote:
    > Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >> "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> OT: Fun with Corelle dinnerware
    >>>
    >>> On "How It's Made" TV show there was a segment on the manufacture of
    >>> Corelle
    >>> dinnerware.
    >>>
    >>> It really was an enjoyable piece on the assembly line of the brand. I
    >>> know
    >>> I'm easily amused but I'd always wanted to know how the stuff is made
    >>> and
    >>> today I got my answer.
    >>>
    >>> From raw ingredients to finished plates, bowls, etc. All run by
    >>> robots. The
    >>> only human hand was a person in final inspection who's job is the 6
    >>> foot drop
    >>> test inspector, once for each run. I guess robots aren't smart or
    >>> enabled
    >>> enough to sweep up broken dishes...
    >>>
    >>> Andy
    >>> --
    >>> "I only know what I read, not what I'm talking about!"
    >>> --Andy
    >>>

    >>
    >> One of my favorite shows. Amazing just how tough that stuff is. I've
    >> been inside a couple of glass plants and while the raw material is
    >> cheap, it takes a lot of expensive automated machinery to make the
    >> huge volumes of pieces to make the end product cheap.
    >>

    > Me too. I am always amazed at how much info companies give away about
    > their processes. I visit a number of interesting plants and in a couple
    > I had to sign an NDA. Cameras aren't allowed on the property. In one
    > place they have a very intricate process that took years to perfect.
    > Visitors are only allowed in that area with an escort and only if they
    > actually need to be there. One day I was watching "How it's Made" and
    > there they are in the secure area of that plant explaining how
    > everything works.


    George,

    Check out this web site. http://factorytoursusa.com/Index.asp

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  7. #7
    > Stu Guest

    Default Re: Fun with Corelle dinnerware

    On Tue, 16 Jun 2009 11:09:09 -0500, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >
    >> Some of David's family lived near Williamstown, W. Va., home of Fenton
    >> Glass. Every time we visited there we went to the factory store where you
    >> could buy items that never hit the general market. We toured the plant
    >> several times, as they were always retooling for producing different items
    >> and the equipment was fascinating. Despite the equipment, there was a lot
    >> of hand work involved as well.
    >>

    >
    >We toured Fenton Glass a few years ago. Found that about 80% of what
    >they were making was exclusive for QVC, the TV shopping thing.
    >
    >There are many wonderful glassworks in that part of WV. We visited at
    >least 5 of them, including one place that makes the glass for stained
    >glass windows.



    The corelle is great stuff but don't drop it on a tile covered cement
    kitchen floor in an apartment. They (plates) blow up in a million
    pieces.

  8. #8
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: OT: Fun with Corelle dinnerware

    On Jun 15, 3:55*pm, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    > OT: Fun with Corelle dinnerware
    >
    > On "How It's Made" TV show there was a segment on the manufacture of Corelle
    > dinnerware.
    >
    > It really was an enjoyable piece on the assembly line of the brand. I know
    > I'm easily amused but I'd always wanted to know how the stuff is made and
    > today I got my answer.
    >
    > From raw ingredients to finished plates, bowls, etc. All run by robots. The
    > only human hand was a person in final inspection who's job is the 6 foot drop
    > test inspector, once for each run. I guess robots aren't smart or enabled
    > enough to sweep up broken dishes...
    >
    > Andy
    > --
    > "I only know what I read, not what I'm talking about!"
    > --Andy


    What amazes me is the equipment and machinery that is invented to make
    stuff like that!

  9. #9
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: OT: Fun with Corelle dinnerware

    Chemo the Clown said...

    > On Jun 15, 3:55*pm, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    >> OT: Fun with Corelle dinnerware
    >>
    >> On "How It's Made" TV show there was a segment on the manufacture of

    Core
    > lle
    >> dinnerware.
    >>
    >> It really was an enjoyable piece on the assembly line of the brand. I

    kno
    > w
    >> I'm easily amused but I'd always wanted to know how the stuff is made

    and
    >> today I got my answer.
    >>
    >> From raw ingredients to finished plates, bowls, etc. All run by robots.

    T
    > he
    >> only human hand was a person in final inspection who's job is the 6 foot

    > drop
    >> test inspector, once for each run. I guess robots aren't smart or

    enabled
    >> enough to sweep up broken dishes...
    >>
    >> Andy
    >> --
    >> "I only know what I read, not what I'm talking about!"
    >> --Andy

    >
    > What amazes me is the equipment and machinery that is invented to make
    > stuff like that!



    Agreed. It's almost Rube Goldbergesque but inverse, having such big
    machines performing such complex tiny functions every step of the way.

    Andy
    --
    "I only know what I read, not what I'm talking about!"
    --Andy


  10. #10
    Merryb Guest

    Default Re: Fun with Corelle dinnerware

    On Jun 16, 9:50*am, "> Stu" <i...@foodforu.ca> wrote:
    > On Tue, 16 Jun 2009 11:09:09 -0500, Janet Wilder
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > <kelliepoo...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > >Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    >
    > >> Some of David's family lived near Williamstown, W. Va., home of Fenton
    > >> Glass. *Every time we visited there we went to the factory store where you
    > >> could buy items that never hit the general market. *We toured the plant
    > >> several times, as they were always retooling for producing different items
    > >> and the equipment was fascinating. *Despite the equipment, there wasa lot
    > >> of hand work involved as well.

    >
    > >We toured Fenton Glass a few years ago. Found that about 80% of what
    > >they were making was exclusive for QVC, the TV shopping thing.

    >
    > >There are many wonderful glassworks in that part of WV. We visited at
    > >least 5 of them, including one place that makes the glass for stained
    > >glass windows.

    >
    > The corelle is great stuff but don't drop it on a tile covered cement
    > kitchen floor in an apartment. *They (plates) blow up in a million
    > pieces.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    They sure do- millions of incredibly sharp shards...

  11. #11
    > Stu Guest

    Default Re: Fun with Corelle dinnerware

    On Tue, 16 Jun 2009 13:40:34 -0700 (PDT), Merryb <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Jun 16, 9:50*am, "> Stu" <i...@foodforu.ca> wrote:
    >> On Tue, 16 Jun 2009 11:09:09 -0500, Janet Wilder
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> <kelliepoo...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >> >Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    >>
    >> >> Some of David's family lived near Williamstown, W. Va., home of Fenton
    >> >> Glass. *Every time we visited there we went to the factory store where you
    >> >> could buy items that never hit the general market. *We toured the plant
    >> >> several times, as they were always retooling for producing different items
    >> >> and the equipment was fascinating. *Despite the equipment, there was a lot
    >> >> of hand work involved as well.

    >>
    >> >We toured Fenton Glass a few years ago. Found that about 80% of what
    >> >they were making was exclusive for QVC, the TV shopping thing.

    >>
    >> >There are many wonderful glassworks in that part of WV. We visited at
    >> >least 5 of them, including one place that makes the glass for stained
    >> >glass windows.

    >>
    >> The corelle is great stuff but don't drop it on a tile covered cement
    >> kitchen floor in an apartment. *They (plates) blow up in a million
    >> pieces.- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    >They sure do- millions of incredibly sharp shards...


    Of course I'm standing by the stove in sock feet, and thousands of
    razor sharp shards were between me and the broom/vacuum.
    Luckily Kath came in a few minutes later.

  12. #12
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Fun with Corelle dinnerware

    > Stu said...

    > Of course I'm standing by the stove in sock feet, and thousands of
    > razor sharp shards were between me and the broom/vacuum.
    > Luckily Kath came in a few minutes later.



    I never broke hot glass or ceramic but I did spill hot bacon grease on my
    left foot moving the pan of bacon to the sink!

    I watched it spill a pool of grease and then bubble some skin away on the top
    of my foot, in my version of slow motion, before the pain set in. I made
    haste to rid myself of the pan and to add Crest toothpaste to cool down the
    burn. It helped but I still have a souvenir of that morning's breakfast error
    that will be with me for the rest of my days!

    Don't cook barefoot!!!

    Andy


  13. #13
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Fun with Corelle dinnerware

    > Stu wrote:

    > The corelle is great stuff but don't drop it on a tile covered cement
    > kitchen floor in an apartment. They (plates) blow up in a million
    > pieces.


    When we rolled our truck and trailer 4 years ago, the cabinets came open
    and the Corelle flew out. It no doubt bounced around while we fishtailed
    back and forth before landing on our left side. A lot of the Corelle
    survived, but the pieces that broke were in a million lethal pieces. We
    decided it was safer to just let some of our stuff lie there than to
    attempt to salvage it. DH is on coumadin and those little shards could
    have been life threatening.

    Couriously, we lived in our fifth wheel trailers with rear kitchens for
    9 years and the only time I broke a Corelle plate was when we were
    parked with all the jacks down and truck disconnected. I dropped one on
    the floor and it smashed into smithereens. A few days later I went to
    the outlet mall and got a replacement.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  14. #14
    Guest

    Default Re: Fun with Corelle dinnerware

    On Tue, 16 Jun 2009 13:40:34 -0700 (PDT), Merryb <[email protected]>
    wrote:
    >>
    >> The corelle is great stuff but don't drop it on a tile covered cement
    >> kitchen floor in an apartment. *They (plates) blow up in a million
    >> pieces.- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    >They sure do- millions of incredibly sharp shards...


    We bought our Correlle in the early 70's ( Harvest Gold )
    It survived three teen-aged sons,
    we still use it every day
    and it still looks as good as the day we bought it.
    ( of course, we didn't have slate floors )


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32