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Thread: OT Airline stories

  1. #1
    Dimitri Guest

    Default OT Airline stories

    As you might have imagined over my, well many years, I have flown quite a
    bit. I started flying at the ripe age of 7 about 1950 in the TWA
    Constellation.

    I have had many experiences and stories here is one I though I would share
    so we all can lighten our day.

    I was taking a red-eye from LAX to Boston for a 2:00 PM appointment with an
    important customer. This flight was routed through the NEW DFW on A/A. We
    left LAX with no problem and got into DFW easily & I boarded the 767 I think
    for a 7:00 AM departure.

    Problem. Something was wrong with the computers they told us.

    It was hot and the flight attendants had the back door open for some air to
    circulate. So I was standing there chatting with the flight attendant just
    to pass the time. I asked her what was the worst thing that ever happened
    to her on a flight.

    She asked if I remembered the AA flight 191 the DC 10 (the 3:00 PM flight
    from Chicago to LA) which lost an engine and wend down? I said of course I
    used to take that flight all the time. She explained their normal procedure
    for AA is to change the time and flight number and the time for the next
    day. For some reason AA forget to do this.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/America...nes_Flight_191

    She explained then very next day she was part of flight 191 form ORD to LAX
    and they had a brand new attendant right out of training in Dallas.

    They departed with a Bang (funny noise). A few minutes later to pilot got
    on the horn and explained they had lose the hydraulic pressure to the nose
    gear steering. The FAA procedure is they would leave the gear down - go out
    over Lake Michigan dump most of their fuel and come back in to a runway with
    all kinds of crash equipment at the ready. He went on to explain the gear
    would stay straight and at landing speeds they steer with the tail (vertical
    stabilizer anyway).

    Now I don't know about you but I always keep one eye on the crew. If they
    start breaking out the Champaign and drinking it themselves and start
    playing grabass you know you're in trouble.

    As it happens while they were out over the lake dumping fuel and the crash
    equipment was getting in place the brand new flight attendant LOST IT!

    SHE RAN UP AND DOWN THE AISLES SCREAMING HYSTERICALLY, "WE'RE ALL GOING TO
    DIE"

    I said, "my god is this true? What was the reaction of the passengers?"
    She assured me this was true, they had to physically restrain the new flight
    attendant and the passengers, well the passengers simply ignored the
    hysterical flight attendant and went about their business as if nothing had
    happened. She said it was a deafening silence.

    They fixed the computer and off we went to Logan 2 hours late none the worse
    for ware.


    I am sure you have some stories - care to share?


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)


  2. #2
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 09:15:34 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >As you might have imagined over my, well many years, I have flown quite a
    >bit. I started flying at the ripe age of 7 about 1950 in the TWA
    >Constellation.
    >
    >I have had many experiences and stories here is one I though I would share
    >so we all can lighten our day.
    >
    >I was taking a red-eye from LAX to Boston for a 2:00 PM appointment with an
    >important customer. This flight was routed through the NEW DFW on A/A. We
    >left LAX with no problem and got into DFW easily & I boarded the 767 I think
    >for a 7:00 AM departure.
    >
    >Problem. Something was wrong with the computers they told us.
    >
    >It was hot and the flight attendants had the back door open for some air to
    >circulate. So I was standing there chatting with the flight attendant just
    >to pass the time. I asked her what was the worst thing that ever happened
    >to her on a flight.
    >
    >She asked if I remembered the AA flight 191 the DC 10 (the 3:00 PM flight
    >from Chicago to LA) which lost an engine and wend down? I said of course I
    >used to take that flight all the time. She explained their normal procedure
    >for AA is to change the time and flight number and the time for the next
    >day. For some reason AA forget to do this.
    >
    >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/America...nes_Flight_191
    >
    >She explained then very next day she was part of flight 191 form ORD to LAX
    >and they had a brand new attendant right out of training in Dallas.
    >
    >They departed with a Bang (funny noise). A few minutes later to pilot got
    >on the horn and explained they had lose the hydraulic pressure to the nose
    >gear steering. The FAA procedure is they would leave the gear down - go out
    >over Lake Michigan dump most of their fuel and come back in to a runway with
    >all kinds of crash equipment at the ready. He went on to explain the gear
    >would stay straight and at landing speeds they steer with the tail (vertical
    >stabilizer anyway).
    >
    >Now I don't know about you but I always keep one eye on the crew. If they
    >start breaking out the Champaign and drinking it themselves and start
    >playing grabass you know you're in trouble.
    >
    >As it happens while they were out over the lake dumping fuel and the crash
    >equipment was getting in place the brand new flight attendant LOST IT!
    >
    >SHE RAN UP AND DOWN THE AISLES SCREAMING HYSTERICALLY, "WE'RE ALL GOING TO
    >DIE"
    >
    >I said, "my god is this true? What was the reaction of the passengers?"
    >She assured me this was true, they had to physically restrain the new flight
    >attendant and the passengers, well the passengers simply ignored the
    >hysterical flight attendant and went about their business as if nothing had
    >happened. She said it was a deafening silence.
    >
    >They fixed the computer and off we went to Logan 2 hours late none the worse
    >for ware.
    >
    >
    >I am sure you have some stories - care to share?


    Wow, that would be irritating! Good story.

    My Dad, long dead, flew often in the 50's. His favorite story that
    has stuck with me, was on a long trip on Pan Am. The pilot could not
    budge the brakes. The first class passengers were asked to either
    pull up or push down the brakes-sorry I don't remember. So they
    rolled up their sleeves and bent down to the opening in the floor
    where the brakes were located and they fixed the problem. My Dad said
    it was fun. He did have his small pilot's license.

    I fly enough and I too always keep a close eye on the flight
    attendants, especially if I hear a weird noise. Figure they're a good
    gauge.

    OT: Going to the Netherlands in a few weeks and although I leave here
    (Hawaii) at 8 pm, it takes 2 days to get to Amsterdam. Pretty much
    flying straight through. Just time zones, mainly and I can't wait!

    aloha,
    beans
    roast beans to kona to email
    farmers of Pure Kona

  3. #3
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >


    <snip>

    > OT: Going to the Netherlands in a few weeks and although I leave here
    > (Hawaii) at 8 pm, it takes 2 days to get to Amsterdam. Pretty much
    > flying straight through. Just time zones, mainly and I can't wait!
    >
    > aloha,
    > beans
    > roast beans to kona to email
    > farmers of Pure Kona


    BTW are you the one who used to post as KonaMacFarmer?

    Especially on the Mexican cooking group


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)


  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    Dimitri wrote:
    > As you might have imagined over my, well many years, I have flown quite
    > a bit.


    I've lain in bed at night trying to imagine how much you've flown. It
    often keeps me up until the wee hours of the morning.

    -sw

  5. #5
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories


    "Sqwertz" <swertz@c[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:g5numq$i2a$[email protected]..
    > Dimitri wrote:
    >> As you might have imagined over my, well many years, I have flown quite a
    >> bit.

    >
    > I've lain in bed at night trying to imagine how much you've flown. It
    > often keeps me up until the wee hours of the morning.
    >
    > -sw


    I think you may have a problem there.

    You really need to get rid if your envy and start thinking about your own
    life and how you can make it better ALL BY YOURSELF.

    :-)


    --
    Old Scoundrel

    (AKA Dimitri)


  6. #6
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    news:ufKfk.12736$[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    > As you might have imagined over my, well many years, I have flown
    > quite a bit. I started flying at the ripe age of 7 about 1950 in the
    > TWA Constellation.


    Gawd... That one was bad. The absolute worst I had was traveling from St.
    Louis to Boston. It was hot... late August. We sat on the tarmack for 3
    hours before they could decide the brakes worked or not. There were a lot
    of kids on the flight and naturally they got cranky. I didn't blame them.
    The cabin was hot as hell. They offered complimentary cocktails but who
    wants to be swilling vodka when it was so hot?

    I wasn't on this flight but a good friend was. This was maybe 20 years or
    so ago. She was traveling from either St. Louis or Chicago (no major
    airlines were in my home town back then and one had to take a puddle jumper
    to one of the majors). Anyway the frigging plane crashed. She said she
    wound up on a piece of wing in what looked like was someone's living room.

    Michael



    --
    Best license plate seen in a long time.

    ~ S CARGO ~

    To email - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  7. #7
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    [email protected] news:[email protected]:
    in rec.food.cooking

    >
    > OT: Going to the Netherlands in a few weeks and although I leave here
    > (Hawaii) at 8 pm, it takes 2 days to get to Amsterdam. Pretty much
    > flying straight through. Just time zones, mainly and I can't wait!


    Have a wonderful time. I can't recall one international flight that has
    been worse than usual. Most of my horror stories have been of the domestic
    variety.

    Michael


    --
    Best license plate seen in a long time.

    ~ S CARGO ~

    To email - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  8. #8
    Karen Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    On Jul 17, 11:53*am, "Michael \"Dog3\"" <f...@good.hot> wrote:
    > They offered complimentary cocktails but who
    > wants to be swilling vodka when it was so hot? *


    I think the vodka would improve things immensely.

    Karen

  9. #9
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    Dimitri wrote:
    > As you might have imagined over my, well many years, I have flown quite
    > a bit. I started flying at the ripe age of 7 about 1950 in the TWA
    > Constellation.

    I crewed on Connies in 1958 with the Navy. We lost our last passenger
    Connie when the pilot knocked the landing gear off on a sea wall coming
    out of a Naval Air Station in Nova Scotia. Had to sit on the fuselage
    all day waiting for the tide to come in so the crash boat could come and
    get us. No one was hurt
    >
    > I have had many experiences and stories here is one I though I would
    > share so we all can lighten our day.
    >
    > I was taking a red-eye from LAX to Boston for a 2:00 PM appointment with
    > an important customer. This flight was routed through the NEW DFW on
    > A/A. We left LAX with no problem and got into DFW easily & I boarded
    > the 767 I think for a 7:00 AM departure.
    >
    > Problem. Something was wrong with the computers they told us.
    >
    > It was hot and the flight attendants had the back door open for some air
    > to circulate. So I was standing there chatting with the flight
    > attendant just to pass the time. I asked her what was the worst thing
    > that ever happened to her on a flight.
    >
    > She asked if I remembered the AA flight 191 the DC 10 (the 3:00 PM
    > flight from Chicago to LA) which lost an engine and wend down? I said of
    > course I used to take that flight all the time. She explained their
    > normal procedure for AA is to change the time and flight number and the
    > time for the next day. For some reason AA forget to do this.
    >
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/America...nes_Flight_191
    >
    > She explained then very next day she was part of flight 191 form ORD to
    > LAX and they had a brand new attendant right out of training in Dallas.
    >
    > They departed with a Bang (funny noise). A few minutes later to pilot
    > got on the horn and explained they had lose the hydraulic pressure to
    > the nose gear steering. The FAA procedure is they would leave the gear
    > down - go out over Lake Michigan dump most of their fuel and come back
    > in to a runway with all kinds of crash equipment at the ready. He went
    > on to explain the gear would stay straight and at landing speeds they
    > steer with the tail (vertical stabilizer anyway).
    >
    > Now I don't know about you but I always keep one eye on the crew. If
    > they start breaking out the Champaign and drinking it themselves and
    > start playing grabass you know you're in trouble.
    >
    > As it happens while they were out over the lake dumping fuel and the
    > crash equipment was getting in place the brand new flight attendant LOST
    > IT!
    >
    > SHE RAN UP AND DOWN THE AISLES SCREAMING HYSTERICALLY, "WE'RE ALL GOING
    > TO DIE"
    >
    > I said, "my god is this true? What was the reaction of the passengers?"
    > She assured me this was true, they had to physically restrain the new
    > flight attendant and the passengers, well the passengers simply ignored
    > the hysterical flight attendant and went about their business as if
    > nothing had happened. She said it was a deafening silence.
    >
    > They fixed the computer and off we went to Logan 2 hours late none the
    > worse for ware.
    >
    >
    > I am sure you have some stories - care to share?
    >
    >


    I've got a funny one: was crewing on an Navy R4Y, Convair 340 twin
    engine transport, was about early 1959. Flying between a NAS in Florida
    and Guantanomo Bay, Cuba with a full load of about 36 civilian
    dependents going to be with their loved ones. As you know the wings on
    aircraft flex a bit, on the R4Y's they flexed a bit more. One older
    woman (well, old to me, I was about eighteen or nineteen at the
    time)pointed out to me that the wing was moving up and down. Told her it
    wasn't anything to worry about but to keep an eye on it and let me know
    if it quit moving. I think she kept her eyes on that wing for the rest
    of the trip.

    We had a pilot (Navy called them plane commanders)who was a joker. One
    flight we had a full load of Marines we were taking somewhere they were
    needed. Pilot strolls down the aisle casually putting on a parachute. I
    had my hands full for a little bit. Military transport pilots are all
    crazy IMHO. But, Lordy, I did love to fly on those old propeller driven
    birds back then. Took us a couple of days to cross the continent back
    then and we often followed highways and railroad tracks.

  10. #10
    Blinky the Shark Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    Dimitri wrote:

    > As you might have imagined over my, well many years, I have flown quite a
    > bit. I started flying at the ripe age of 7 about 1950 in the TWA
    > Constellation.


    The Lockheed Consetllation remains the most beautiful airliner ever.


    --
    Blinky
    Killing all posts from Google Groups
    The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
    Need a new news feed? http://blinkynet.net/comp/newfeed.html


  11. #11
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    Blinky the Shark wrote:
    > Dimitri wrote:
    >
    >> As you might have imagined over my, well many years, I have flown quite a
    >> bit. I started flying at the ripe age of 7 about 1950 in the TWA
    >> Constellation.

    >
    > The Lockheed Consetllation remains the most beautiful airliner ever.
    >
    >

    I have to agree with that one Blinky. I loved those noisy old birds. The
    Airborne Early Warning ones that the Navy flew in the fifties had a
    distressing tendency to fall out of the sky but I suspect that was due
    to the radar domes on the top and belly of the birds. Made them look
    like a hump-backed, pregnant snake.

    Spent many a night in the barracks listening to the old girls coming
    down the taxi strip to the nearby AEW squadron hangar with the brakes
    squealing and squalling. Sorta like listening to a steam train coming
    down the tracks but less noisy.

    Some of them were still flown up into the early years of Vietnam by the
    Air Farce. Good friend of mine flew them on "bus" runs from Thailand to Nam.

  12. #12
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    On Jul 17, 9:28*am, be...@smithfarms.com wrote:
    > On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 09:15:34 -0700, "Dimitri" <Dimitr...@prodigy.net>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >As you might have imagined over my, well many years, I have flown quite a
    > >bit. *I started flying at the ripe age of 7 about 1950 in the TWA
    > >Constellation.

    >
    > >I have had many experiences and stories here is one I though I would share
    > >so we all can lighten our day.

    >
    > >I was taking a red-eye from LAX to Boston for a 2:00 PM appointment withan
    > >important customer. This flight was routed through the NEW DFW on A/A. *We
    > >left LAX with no problem and got into DFW easily & I boarded the 767 I think
    > >for a 7:00 AM departure.

    >
    > >Problem. Something was wrong with the computers they told us.

    >
    > >It was hot and the flight attendants had the back door open for some airto
    > >circulate. *So I was standing there chatting with the flight attendantjust
    > >to pass the time. *I asked her what was the worst thing that ever happened
    > >to her on a flight.

    >
    > >She asked if I remembered the AA flight 191 *the DC 10 (the 3:00 PM flight
    > >from Chicago to LA) which lost an engine and wend down? I said of courseI
    > >used to take that flight all the time. *She explained their normal procedure
    > >for AA is to change the time and flight number and the time *for the next
    > >day. *For some reason AA forget to do this.

    >
    > >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/America...nes_Flight_191

    >
    > >She explained then very next day she was part of flight 191 form ORD to LAX
    > >and they had a brand new attendant right out of training in Dallas.

    >
    > >They departed with a Bang (funny noise). *A few minutes later to pilotgot
    > >on the horn and explained they had lose the hydraulic pressure to the nose
    > >gear steering. *The FAA procedure is they would leave the gear down - go out
    > >over Lake Michigan dump most of their fuel and come back in to a runway with
    > >all kinds of crash equipment at the ready. *He went on to explain the gear
    > >would stay straight and at landing speeds they steer with the tail (vertical
    > >stabilizer anyway).

    >
    > >Now I don't know about you but I always keep one eye on the crew. If they
    > >start breaking out the Champaign and drinking it themselves and start
    > >playing grabass you know you're in trouble.

    >
    > >As it happens while they were out over the lake dumping fuel and the crash
    > >equipment was getting in place the brand new flight attendant LOST IT!

    >
    > >SHE RAN UP AND DOWN THE AISLES SCREAMING HYSTERICALLY, "WE'RE ALL GOING TO
    > >DIE"

    >
    > >I said, *"my god is this true? What was the reaction of the passengers?"
    > >She assured me this was true, they had to physically restrain the new flight
    > >attendant and the passengers, well the passengers simply ignored the
    > >hysterical flight attendant and went about their business as if nothing had
    > >happened. *She said it was a deafening silence.

    >
    > >They fixed the computer and off we went to Logan 2 hours late none the worse
    > >for ware.

    >
    > >I am sure you have some stories - care to share?

    >
    > Wow, that would be irritating! *Good story. *
    >
    > My Dad, long dead, flew often in the 50's. *His favorite story that
    > has stuck with me, was on a long trip on Pan Am. The pilot could not
    > budge the brakes. *The first class passengers were asked to either
    > pull up or push down the brakes-sorry I don't remember. *So they
    > rolled up their sleeves and bent down to the opening in the floor
    > where the brakes were located and they fixed the problem. My Dad said
    > it was fun. *He did have his small pilot's license.
    >
    > I fly enough and I too always keep a close eye on the flight
    > attendants, especially if I hear a weird noise. *Figure they're a good
    > gauge.
    >
    > OT: Going to the Netherlands in a few weeks and although I leave here
    > (Hawaii) at 8 pm, it takes 2 days to get to Amsterdam. *Pretty much
    > flying straight through. *Just time zones, mainly and I can't wait!
    >
    > aloha,
    > beans
    > roast beans to kona to email
    > * farmers of Pure Kona- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Wow- have a great trip- that's someplace I'd love to go...

  13. #13
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    [email protected] wrote:

    >
    >
    > My Dad, long dead, flew often in the 50's. His favorite story that
    > has stuck with me, was on a long trip on Pan Am. The pilot could not
    > budge the brakes. The first class passengers were asked to either
    > pull up or push down the brakes-sorry I don't remember. So they
    > rolled up their sleeves and bent down to the opening in the floor
    > where the brakes were located and they fixed the problem. My Dad said
    > it was fun. He did have his small pilot's license.
    >
    > I fly enough and I too always keep a close eye on the flight
    > attendants, especially if I hear a weird noise. Figure they're a good
    > gauge.
    >
    > OT: Going to the Netherlands in a few weeks and although I leave here
    > (Hawaii) at 8 pm, it takes 2 days to get to Amsterdam. Pretty much
    > flying straight through. Just time zones, mainly and I can't wait!


    Have a great trip. I was at Schipol airport twice last month, once on the way to
    Estonia and then two weeks later on the way back from Denmark. We spent a few
    days in the Netherlands 7 years ago. We had an enjoyable stay in the village of
    Bronkurst, which bills itself as Holland's smallest, oldest city. We also had a
    very enjoyable one night stay in Breda, which has a wonderful downtown pedestrian
    square. Watch out if you are driving. I got a (photoradar) speeding ticket in
    the mail almost 5 months I was there. I was clocked doing 54 in a 50 kph
    zone..... walking speed over the limit.



  14. #14
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 09:56:30 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    ><[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >>

    >
    ><snip>
    >
    >> OT: Going to the Netherlands in a few weeks and although I leave here
    >> (Hawaii) at 8 pm, it takes 2 days to get to Amsterdam. Pretty much
    >> flying straight through. Just time zones, mainly and I can't wait!
    >>
    >> aloha,
    >> beans
    >> roast beans to kona to email
    >> farmers of Pure Kona

    >
    >BTW are you the one who used to post as KonaMacFarmer?
    >
    >Especially on the Mexican cooking group


    No. Foremost I am coffee.

    aloha,
    beans
    roast beans to kona to email
    farmers of Pure Kona

  15. #15
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 18:54:32 GMT, "Michael \"Dog3\"" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >[email protected] news:[email protected]:
    >in rec.food.cooking
    >
    >>
    >> OT: Going to the Netherlands in a few weeks and although I leave here
    >> (Hawaii) at 8 pm, it takes 2 days to get to Amsterdam. Pretty much
    >> flying straight through. Just time zones, mainly and I can't wait!

    >
    >Have a wonderful time. I can't recall one international flight that has
    >been worse than usual. Most of my horror stories have been of the domestic
    >variety.
    >
    >Michael


    Thanks Michael, I can't wait!

    with aloha,
    Cea
    roast beans to kona to email
    farmers of Pure Kona

  16. #16
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 19:14:56 -0400, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> My Dad, long dead, flew often in the 50's. His favorite story that
    >> has stuck with me, was on a long trip on Pan Am. The pilot could not
    >> budge the brakes. The first class passengers were asked to either
    >> pull up or push down the brakes-sorry I don't remember. So they
    >> rolled up their sleeves and bent down to the opening in the floor
    >> where the brakes were located and they fixed the problem. My Dad said
    >> it was fun. He did have his small pilot's license.
    >>
    >> I fly enough and I too always keep a close eye on the flight
    >> attendants, especially if I hear a weird noise. Figure they're a good
    >> gauge.
    >>
    >> OT: Going to the Netherlands in a few weeks and although I leave here
    >> (Hawaii) at 8 pm, it takes 2 days to get to Amsterdam. Pretty much
    >> flying straight through. Just time zones, mainly and I can't wait!

    >
    > Have a great trip. I was at Schipol airport twice last month, once on the way to
    >Estonia and then two weeks later on the way back from Denmark. We spent a few
    >days in the Netherlands 7 years ago. We had an enjoyable stay in the village of
    >Bronkurst, which bills itself as Holland's smallest, oldest city. We also had a
    >very enjoyable one night stay in Breda, which has a wonderful downtown pedestrian
    >square. Watch out if you are driving. I got a (photoradar) speeding ticket in
    >the mail almost 5 months I was there. I was clocked doing 54 in a 50 kph
    >zone..... walking speed over the limit.
    >


    Thanks. I am sure I will be taking public transport or biking or
    walking- no driving.

    aloha,
    beans
    roast beans to kona to email
    farmers of Pure Kona

  17. #17
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 14:51:43 -0700, Blinky the Shark
    <[email protected]> fired up random neurons and synapses to opine:

    >Dimitri wrote:
    >
    >> As you might have imagined over my, well many years, I have flown quite a
    >> bit. I started flying at the ripe age of 7 about 1950 in the TWA
    >> Constellation.

    >
    >The Lockheed Consetllation remains the most beautiful airliner ever.
    >

    And the B-47 was the most beautiful aircraft Boeing ever designed.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd...the Bomber Pilot's Kid
    --
    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    -- Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"





  18. #18
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >
    > On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 14:51:43 -0700, Blinky the Shark
    > <[email protected]> fired up random neurons and synapses to opine:
    >
    > >Dimitri wrote:
    > >
    > >> As you might have imagined over my, well many years, I have flown quite a
    > >> bit. I started flying at the ripe age of 7 about 1950 in the TWA
    > >> Constellation.

    > >
    > >The Lockheed Consetllation remains the most beautiful airliner ever.
    > >

    > And the B-47 was the most beautiful aircraft Boeing ever designed.
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd...the Bomber Pilot's Kid
    > --
    > "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    > old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    > waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."
    >
    > -- Duncan Hines
    >
    > To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"


    Just the other day, I saw an authentic, refurbished B-17 fly overhead my
    house! I heard the engines beforehand and ran outdoors. I was lucky
    enough to catch a brief glimpse as the aircraft flew northwards. I only
    wish I had had my camera ready at hand! It was some sight to see!
    Gleeming silver and four engines in the bright crystal blue sky!

    Sky, who says "THANK YOU" to all "military service" personnel!

    --
    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice

  19. #19
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 09:15:34 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    fired up random neurons and synapses to opine:

    >I am sure you have some stories - care to share?


    Years ago, the DH was flying out of New Delhi when he experienced what
    could only be loosely termed "turbulence." Man, that aircraft dropped
    like an elevator with a broken cable. Dropped hundreds of feet in
    seconds; overheads spilled open, flight attendants thrown all over the
    place - one of them had her arm broken, absolute mayhem. When the
    plane finally stabilized, screaming and yelling from the rear of the
    aircraft could be heard. Some guy had been in the lavatory when the
    plane dropped like a rock - when the flight attendants opened the
    lavatory door, there was some poor guy just covered with blue dye and
    toilet paper.

    --

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    "Some weasel took the cork out of my lunch!"

    -- W.C. Fields

  20. #20
    Shanghai McCoy Guest

    Default Re: OT Airline stories

    Sky wrote:
    > Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >> On Thu, 17 Jul 2008 14:51:43 -0700, Blinky the Shark
    >> <[email protected]> fired up random neurons and synapses to opine:
    >>
    >>> Dimitri wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> As you might have imagined over my, well many years, I have flown quite a
    >>>> bit. I started flying at the ripe age of 7 about 1950 in the TWA
    >>>> Constellation.
    >>> The Lockheed Consetllation remains the most beautiful airliner ever.
    >>>

    >> And the B-47 was the most beautiful aircraft Boeing ever designed.
    >>
    >> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd...the Bomber Pilot's Kid
    >> --
    >> "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    >> old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    >> waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."
    >>
    >> -- Duncan Hines
    >>
    >> To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"

    >
    > Just the other day, I saw an authentic, refurbished B-17 fly overhead my
    > house! I heard the engines beforehand and ran outdoors. I was lucky
    > enough to catch a brief glimpse as the aircraft flew northwards. I only
    > wish I had had my camera ready at hand! It was some sight to see!
    > Gleeming silver and four engines in the bright crystal blue sky!
    >
    > Sky, who says "THANK YOU" to all "military service" personnel!
    >


    A few years ago I heard a B-17 coming in... I'd never heard one before,
    but OMYGODAB17!!! Couldn't believe it when I saw it.. Those R-1820's
    just sounded like hot-rods....

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