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Thread: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...

  1. #1
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...


    "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] m...
    > Yup, kids...it's been a quarter - century of the cellphone already, can ya
    > believe it!? Posted because "cellphones in restaurants" are an
    > "evergreen"
    > topic here on rfc...remember the old daze when you'd see in movies someone
    > taking a call in a foofie restaurant, the phone being brought to the table
    > by the maitre'd and being plugged in...:
    >


    I remember TV shows from the 80s where they had big huge cellphones the size
    of a regular phone. Late 80s and early 90s, I remember "car phones" because
    you had to be in the car to use them, and they required a special antennae
    mounted on the car. My first cell phone was in 1995 and I remember feeling
    way behind the times when I got it.


  2. #2
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...

    Yup, kids...it's been a quarter - century of the cellphone already, can ya
    believe it!? Posted because "cellphones in restaurants" are an "evergreen"
    topic here on rfc...remember the old daze when you'd see in movies someone
    taking a call in a foofie restaurant, the phone being brought to the table
    by the maitre'd and being plugged in...:


    http://www.suntimes.com/technology/1...moto13.article

    25 years of cell phone service

    GOING WIRELESS | First cell phone call at Chicago's Soldier Field in October
    '83

    October 13, 2008

    BY BRAD SPIRRISON AND SANDRA GUY

    "Who would have thought 25 years ago that Americans would walk around like
    the Borg from "Star Trek," seemingly wired in to their cell phones around
    the clock?

    The inventors of the cell phone certainly didn't.

    Today marks the 25th anniversary of the first commercial wireless call. It
    happened Oct. 13, 1983, at Soldier Field, where Ameritech Mobile, now part
    of Verizon Wireless, made the call from a Motorola DynaTAC 8000X known as
    the "brick" phone. The phone cost $3,995, was 13 inches long, and weighed
    1.75 pounds.

    Paul Gudonis, who was vice president of marketing for Ameritech Mobile
    Communications and who organized the launch, said 20 customers of the new
    cell phone service were invited to the event.

    Ameritech asked 20 service technicians from the company's distributors to
    race to see who could install the wireless chip the fastest in a transceiver
    in the customers' cars. The techs ran from a starting line to their
    customers' cars. The winner who activated the service the fastest received a
    free mobile phone.

    The late Jack Brickhouse, then the broadcaster for the Cubs, served as
    master of ceremonies. Bob Barnett, president of Ameritech Mobile, made the
    first cell phone call to Alexander Graham Bell's great-grandson, who
    happened to be in Germany at the time.

    Katie Boudas, who was head of public relations for Ameritech Mobile at the
    time, recited cell phone expenses that would shock people today:

    .. . Service cost $50 a month plus 40 cents a minute peak, 24 cents
    off-peak. There were no free minutes in those days, Boudas said. The
    original network had 12 cell sites in the Chicago area.

    .. . The first year, Ameritech Mobile signed up 12,000 subscribers.
    Verizon Wireless now has 68.7 million subscribers and generates $48.7
    billion in annual revenue.

    .. . Total wireless subscribers totaled 262.7 million, or 84 percent of
    the U.S. population, as of June, according to the International Association
    for Wireless Telecommunications. Nearly half, or 46 percent, of children
    ages 8 to 12 use cell phones, according to the Nielsen Co.

    Other members of the start-up team were Evan Richards, vice president of
    engineering; Dennis Hackl, chief financial officer, and Allan Arlow, general
    counsel. Hank Lucas served as general manager of the trial run.

    "Originally, the cell phone was about liberating people from the wires of
    the telephone call," said Jim Wicks, corporate vice president and director
    of Motorola's consumer experience design team. "Now, it's about liberating
    people from their desktops. It's about information, entertainment, movies,
    music and social networks."

    Motorola has posted a Web site to commemorate the anniversary at:


    http://www.promo.motorola.com/25thAnv/index.html.


    </>



  3. #3
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...

    On Mon 13 Oct 2008 03:26:34p, Gregory Morrow told us...

    > Yup, kids...it's been a quarter - century of the cellphone already, can ya
    > believe it!? Posted because "cellphones in restaurants" are an "evergreen"
    > topic here on rfc...remember the old daze when you'd see in movies someone
    > taking a call in a foofie restaurant, the phone being brought to the table
    > by the maitre'd and being plugged in...:


    I certainly remember my first one which was hardwired into my car (then
    considered a mobile phone), but it was cellular. Expensive as hell, too.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    (correct the spelling of "geemail" to reply)

    *******************************************
    Date: Monday, 10(X)/13(XIII)/08(MMVIII)
    *******************************************
    Today is: Columbus Day, Thanksgiving Day (Canada)
    Countdown till Veteran's Day
    4wks 8hrs 22mins
    *******************************************
    If sex isn't messy, you're not doing

  4. #4
    Sharon Chilson Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...


    I bought my first cell phone in 1994. It was a workhorse of a phone, an
    Audiovox, and it came with two batteries so you could always have one
    charging. I think the plan I had was around $30 a month and it gave me
    20 minutes. Extra minutes were very expensive.

    I had it and a beeper so that even when I wasn't in the office, if
    something came up, my employees could get in touch with me no matter
    where I was.

    It was a great phone, very well made and I never had any problems with
    it, but it was bulky and heavy compared to the cell phones of today.


  5. #5
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...


    Cheryl wrote:

    > "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] m...
    > > Yup, kids...it's been a quarter - century of the cellphone already, can

    ya
    > > believe it!? Posted because "cellphones in restaurants" are an
    > > "evergreen"
    > > topic here on rfc...remember the old daze when you'd see in movies

    someone
    > > taking a call in a foofie restaurant, the phone being brought to the

    table
    > > by the maitre'd and being plugged in...:
    > >

    >
    > I remember TV shows from the 80s where they had big huge cellphones the

    size
    > of a regular phone.



    I remember a _Columbo_ episode from the mid - 80's or so where "tracing" a
    cell call featured in getting the perp..._Murder She Wrote_ IIRC had similar
    plotlines. The perps were all wealthy, natch...


    Late 80s and early 90s, I remember "car phones" because
    > you had to be in the car to use them, and they required a special antennae
    > mounted on the car.



    Remember those fake car phone antennae that were sold for those who wanted
    to "impress", but didn't have the actual bux for a real "car phone"...


    My first cell phone was in 1995 and I remember feeling
    > way behind the times when I got it.



    I still don't have one...

    :-)


    --
    Best
    Greg



  6. #6
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...


    "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] m...
    > Yup, kids...it's been a quarter - century of the cellphone already, can ya
    > believe it!? Posted because "cellphones in restaurants" are an
    > "evergreen"
    > topic here on rfc...remember the old daze when you'd see in movies someone
    > taking a call in a foofie restaurant, the phone being brought to the table
    > by the maitre'd and being plugged in...:


    <snip>

    I hate to piss on the birthday cake but here goes;

    The cell phone being convenient is also an umbilical cord to the office and
    home.

    There was a time when driving home or to work was private time, time to
    listen to music, news or just be alone and think.

    It is so bad California had to pass a law making it unlawful to text or read
    text messages while driving. Multitasking is tantamount to your boss asking
    you what you accomplished when you were supposed to be off and on your own
    time.

    When you go on a business trip what is the first thing you do when you land,
    why turn on your cell phone of course.

    When you get to the hotel don't you plug in your laptop, jump on the
    internet then open your VPN key and log on to work to down load and answer
    your emails?

    There was a time when you got to the hotel and unpacked and told your
    associates you'd meet at the bar. Now you have to catch up. What ever
    happened to sitting by the pool after the last appointment?

    Business travel used to be fun - a mini vacation, now it's nothing more than
    an extension of your office.

    For every new technology there is a price to pay. So much for the GLOBAL
    VILLAGE and a Global economic meltdown.

    Have a nice day.

    Dimitri


  7. #7
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...

    "Sharon Chilson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > I bought my first cell phone in 1994. It was a workhorse of a phone, an
    > Audiovox, and it came with two batteries so you could always have one
    > charging. I think the plan I had was around $30 a month and it gave me
    > 20 minutes. Extra minutes were very expensive.
    >
    > I had it and a beeper so that even when I wasn't in the office, if
    > something came up, my employees could get in touch with me no matter
    > where I was.
    >
    > It was a great phone, very well made and I never had any problems with
    > it, but it was bulky and heavy compared to the cell phones of today.
    >


    My first one was just for emergencies with a similar plan to yours -- 20
    minutes. What made me get it was I was taking night classes along with
    Saturday day classes and one Saturday my car broke down on the highway. It
    was a pretty long drive from central MD to VA and when I broke down I had to
    walk what would have been a long way to a payphone (there's that word
    again). I got lucky and a family in a minivan stopped and gave me a ride,
    but after that I was scared to get stranded at night without a way to
    contact someone.


  8. #8
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Mon 13 Oct 2008 03:26:34p, Gregory Morrow told us...
    >
    >> Yup, kids...it's been a quarter - century of the cellphone already, can ya
    >> believe it!? Posted because "cellphones in restaurants" are an "evergreen"
    >> topic here on rfc...remember the old daze when you'd see in movies someone
    >> taking a call in a foofie restaurant, the phone being brought to the table
    >> by the maitre'd and being plugged in...:

    >
    > I certainly remember my first one which was hardwired into my car (then
    > considered a mobile phone), but it was cellular. Expensive as hell, too.


    I bought one for my wife one year. It was bout $350 for the phone and I
    prepaid for service for a year and it included messages. I didn't get a
    lot of monthly time. Then I started getting the bills. I was shocked.
    I could not understand why they were so high. It turned out that every
    time she got into the car she was checking her messages. She didn't
    realize that every call was a minimum one minute or that she was being
    charged to check them.

    Worse than that, she was working in a nearby city and taking back roads
    to and from work. The idea of the phone was that it was for emergencies.
    There was no service along 90% of her route. Service was so bad that I
    could not even call home from our town, which is two miles down the road.

    Now I have a different cell provider. It's service was not as good
    across the country, but was much better in this area. I have a basic
    emergency use plan, 50 minutes per month. I have never used more than 10
    minutes a month. Some months I never use it at all. That makes me wonder
    about the people who use them all the time while driving. Yesterday I
    saw one of the neighbours down the road yakking on her phone as she was
    pulling out of her driveway.





  9. #9
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...

    "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:48f39ca1$0$30511$[email protected] m...

    <snip>

    > Now I have a different cell provider. It's service was not as good across
    > the country, but was much better in this area. I have a basic emergency
    > use plan, 50 minutes per month. I have never used more than 10 minutes a
    > month. Some months I never use it at all. That makes me wonder about the
    > people who use them all the time while driving. Yesterday I saw one of the
    > neighbours down the road yakking on her phone as she was pulling out of
    > her driveway.
    >


    What I can never understand is the people I see yakking on the cell phone in
    the car at 6:30 in the morning. If it was just a few I could understand.
    But it's like every other car, and my commute is along a very busy highway
    with thousands of my closest neighbors all driving at the same time.


  10. #10
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...


    "Cheryl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:THQIk.14801$[email protected]..
    > "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:48f39ca1$0$30511$[email protected] m...
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >> Now I have a different cell provider. It's service was not as good across
    >> the country, but was much better in this area. I have a basic emergency
    >> use plan, 50 minutes per month. I have never used more than 10 minutes a
    >> month. Some months I never use it at all. That makes me wonder about the
    >> people who use them all the time while driving. Yesterday I saw one of
    >> the neighbours down the road yakking on her phone as she was pulling out
    >> of her driveway.
    >>

    >
    > What I can never understand is the people I see yakking on the cell phone
    > in the car at 6:30 in the morning. If it was just a few I could
    > understand. But it's like every other car, and my commute is along a very
    > busy highway with thousands of my closest neighbors all driving at the
    > same time.


    Time shift - driving @ 6:30 AM in CA chatting with a business associate in
    Dallas where it's 8:30 AM.

    Increased productivity !

    Dimitri


  11. #11
    val189 Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...

    On Oct 13, 6:39 pm, Wayne Boatwright <wayneboatwri...@geemail.com>
    wrote:

    > I certainly remember my first one which was hardwired into my car (then
    > considered a mobile phone), but it was cellular. Expensive as hell, too.


    Giving away my age, but in the late forties, I was ( a mere kid) at a
    wedding reception and there was a car phone in the bride's limo. - I
    was extremely impressed - ya had to really BE someone and KNOW someone
    to get one of those channels.

    Got my first cel in 1991 - a clunker of an instrument, but if you kept
    the service for 3 years, there was a 300 buck rebate. I hardly use
    the one I have now - it never is on for incoming calls, and there are
    months I never use it at all. I call it peace of mind money, when I
    pay the bill. Half the time, it's not even in the car with me, but I
    won't give it up. There's a ton of longdistance thru it, but I can't
    stand the pooor transmission and usually use a landline.

  12. #12
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...

    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:EVQIk.2477$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Cheryl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:THQIk.14801$[email protected]..
    >> "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:48f39ca1$0$30511$[email protected] m...
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >>> Now I have a different cell provider. It's service was not as good
    >>> across the country, but was much better in this area. I have a basic
    >>> emergency use plan, 50 minutes per month. I have never used more than 10
    >>> minutes a month. Some months I never use it at all. That makes me wonder
    >>> about the people who use them all the time while driving. Yesterday I
    >>> saw one of the neighbours down the road yakking on her phone as she was
    >>> pulling out of her driveway.
    >>>

    >>
    >> What I can never understand is the people I see yakking on the cell phone
    >> in the car at 6:30 in the morning. If it was just a few I could
    >> understand. But it's like every other car, and my commute is along a very
    >> busy highway with thousands of my closest neighbors all driving at the
    >> same time.

    >
    > Time shift - driving @ 6:30 AM in CA chatting with a business associate in
    > Dallas where it's 8:30 AM.
    >
    > Increased productivity !
    >



    LOL! I'm in MD.


  13. #13
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...


    "Cheryl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:VYQIk.53243$[email protected]..
    > "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:EVQIk.2477$[email protected]..
    >>
    >> "Cheryl" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:THQIk.14801$[email protected]..
    >>> "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:48f39ca1$0$30511$[email protected] m...
    >>>
    >>> <snip>
    >>>
    >>>> Now I have a different cell provider. It's service was not as good
    >>>> across the country, but was much better in this area. I have a basic
    >>>> emergency use plan, 50 minutes per month. I have never used more than
    >>>> 10 minutes a month. Some months I never use it at all. That makes me
    >>>> wonder about the people who use them all the time while driving.
    >>>> Yesterday I saw one of the neighbours down the road yakking on her
    >>>> phone as she was pulling out of her driveway.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> What I can never understand is the people I see yakking on the cell
    >>> phone in the car at 6:30 in the morning. If it was just a few I could
    >>> understand. But it's like every other car, and my commute is along a
    >>> very busy highway with thousands of my closest neighbors all driving at
    >>> the same time.

    >>
    >> Time shift - driving @ 6:30 AM in CA chatting with a business associate
    >> in Dallas where it's 8:30 AM.
    >>
    >> Increased productivity !
    >>

    >
    >
    > LOL! I'm in MD.


    Well you can't call your girl/boy friend form home you know.

    ;-)

    Dimitri



  14. #14
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...

    Cheryl wrote:

    > What I can never understand is the people I see yakking on the cell
    > phone in the car at 6:30 in the morning.


    Or, as I mentioned in another post..... talking on a cell phone while
    pulling out of their driveway.

    > If it was just a few I could
    > understand. But it's like every other car, and my commute is along a
    > very busy highway with thousands of my closest neighbors all driving at
    > the same time.


    And isn't it reassuring to know that 50% of your fellow commuters are on
    paying more attention to their conversation than they are to the traffic.

  15. #15
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...

    Dimitri wrote:

    >>> What I can never understand is the people I see yakking on the cell

    >> phone in the car at 6:30 in the morning. If it was just a few I could
    >> understand. But it's like every other car, and my commute is along a
    >> very busy highway with thousands of my closest neighbors all driving
    >> at the same time.

    >
    > Time shift - driving @ 6:30 AM in CA chatting with a business associate
    > in Dallas where it's 8:30 AM.
    >
    > Increased productivity !
    >


    And an accident looking for a place to happen.


  16. #16
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...


    "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] m...
    > Yup, kids...it's been a quarter - century of the cellphone already, can ya
    > believe it!? Posted because "cellphones in restaurants" are an
    > "evergreen"
    > topic here on rfc...remember the old daze when you'd see in movies someone
    > taking a call in a foofie restaurant, the phone being brought to the table
    > by the maitre'd and being plugged in...:
    >
    >
    > http://www.suntimes.com/technology/1...moto13.article
    >
    > 25 years of cell phone service
    >
    > GOING WIRELESS | First cell phone call at Chicago's Soldier Field in
    > October
    > '83
    >
    > October 13, 2008
    >
    > BY BRAD SPIRRISON AND SANDRA GUY
    >
    > "Who would have thought 25 years ago that Americans would walk around like
    > the Borg from "Star Trek," seemingly wired in to their cell phones around
    > the clock?
    >
    > The inventors of the cell phone certainly didn't.
    >
    > Today marks the 25th anniversary of the first commercial wireless call. It
    > happened Oct. 13, 1983, at Soldier Field, where Ameritech Mobile, now part
    > of Verizon Wireless, made the call from a Motorola DynaTAC 8000X known as
    > the "brick" phone. The phone cost $3,995, was 13 inches long, and weighed
    > 1.75 pounds.
    >
    > Paul Gudonis, who was vice president of marketing for Ameritech Mobile
    > Communications and who organized the launch, said 20 customers of the new
    > cell phone service were invited to the event.
    >
    > Ameritech asked 20 service technicians from the company's distributors to
    > race to see who could install the wireless chip the fastest in a
    > transceiver
    > in the customers' cars. The techs ran from a starting line to their
    > customers' cars. The winner who activated the service the fastest received
    > a
    > free mobile phone.
    >
    > The late Jack Brickhouse, then the broadcaster for the Cubs, served as
    > master of ceremonies. Bob Barnett, president of Ameritech Mobile, made the
    > first cell phone call to Alexander Graham Bell's great-grandson, who
    > happened to be in Germany at the time.
    >
    > Katie Boudas, who was head of public relations for Ameritech Mobile at the
    > time, recited cell phone expenses that would shock people today:
    >
    > . . Service cost $50 a month plus 40 cents a minute peak, 24 cents
    > off-peak. There were no free minutes in those days, Boudas said. The
    > original network had 12 cell sites in the Chicago area.
    >
    > . . The first year, Ameritech Mobile signed up 12,000 subscribers.
    > Verizon Wireless now has 68.7 million subscribers and generates $48.7
    > billion in annual revenue.
    >
    > . . Total wireless subscribers totaled 262.7 million, or 84 percent of
    > the U.S. population, as of June, according to the International
    > Association
    > for Wireless Telecommunications. Nearly half, or 46 percent, of children
    > ages 8 to 12 use cell phones, according to the Nielsen Co.
    >
    > Other members of the start-up team were Evan Richards, vice president of
    > engineering; Dennis Hackl, chief financial officer, and Allan Arlow,
    > general
    > counsel. Hank Lucas served as general manager of the trial run.
    >
    > "Originally, the cell phone was about liberating people from the wires of
    > the telephone call," said Jim Wicks, corporate vice president and director
    > of Motorola's consumer experience design team. "Now, it's about liberating
    > people from their desktops. It's about information, entertainment, movies,
    > music and social networks."
    >
    > Motorola has posted a Web site to commemorate the anniversary at:



    Reminds me of a woman I knew in 1989. She received a car cell phone as a
    reward for doing a lot of volunteer work for a charity. Her car was broken
    into (smashed in window) and the phone stolen the very same evening. Total
    repairs were as much as the phone would have cost her and insurance didn't
    cover it.

    Paul



  17. #17
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...

    Gregory Morrow wrote:
    >
    > Cheryl wrote:
    >
    > My first cell phone was in 1995 and I remember feeling
    > > way behind the times when I got it.

    >
    > I still don't have one...


    I've never used one.

    By the way, they cook your brains.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/03/health/03well.html

  18. #18
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...

    Dave Smith wrote:
    >
    > Dimitri wrote:
    >
    > > Time shift - driving @ 6:30 AM in CA chatting with a business associate
    > > in Dallas where it's 8:30 AM.
    > >
    > > Increased productivity !

    >
    > And an accident looking for a place to happen.


    There are cellphone suppression devices used in theaters
    and restaurants, probably illegal. However, catching
    a mobile cellphone suppressor would probably be difficult.
    And it would make you and the people around you safer.

  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: OT: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...

    On Mon, 13 Oct 2008 18:43:03 -0400, [email protected] (Sharon
    Chilson) wrote:

    >It was a great phone, very well made and I never had any problems with
    >it, but it was bulky and heavy compared to the cell phones of today.


    Was it one of those cellphones that had it's own briefcase, or were
    those earlier models?


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  20. #20
    sf Guest

    Default Re: 25 Years Of The Cell Phone...

    On Mon, 13 Oct 2008 16:00:15 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I hate to piss on the birthday cake but here goes;
    >
    >The cell phone being convenient is also an umbilical cord to the office and
    >home.
    >
    >There was a time when driving home or to work was private time, time to
    >listen to music, news or just be alone and think.


    I *love* my cellphone, but it's not used for work and I don't spend
    much time on it yakking.


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

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