Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 31

Thread: Oso sweet onion

  1. #1
    sf Guest

    Default Oso sweet onion


    I usually buy the bags of smaller onions because I prefer being able
    to use it up quickly and not have a cut onion sitting around in my
    refrigerator. However, this week the price of bagged onions was too
    high for me and the loose, larger onions looked interesting. They
    were flat at both ends, like a giant cippolini onion, and the sticker
    said USA - so I bought a couple of them. Imagine my surprise when I
    googled ososweetonions.com and discovered that they are grown in
    Chili. How do they get away with saying USA on the sticker with no
    indication of being grown in Chili?

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  2. #2
    gtr Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On 2012-06-22 16:32:28 +0000, sf said:

    > They were flat at both ends, like a giant cippolini onion, and the sticker
    > said USA - so I bought a couple of them. Imagine my surprise when I
    > googled ososweetonions.com and discovered that they are grown in
    > Chili.


    It's understanable a cook would spell it Chili, but the country is
    Chile. The onions can and are grown elsewhere.

    > How do they get away with saying USA on the sticker with no indication
    > of being grown in Chili?


    By growing them in the US.

    On the website you indicate above is this quote:

    "Not only are our world-class onions grown in Chile, but we have also
    found an ideal growing area in Weslaco, Texas. These domestically grown
    onions feature the same Chilean size, taste, and quality, but allow our
    sweet onion season to be extended all the way through May."


  3. #3
    George Leppla Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On 6/22/2012 12:32 PM, gtr wrote:
    > On 2012-06-22 16:32:28 +0000, sf said:
    >
    >> They were flat at both ends, like a giant cippolini onion, and the sticker
    >> said USA - so I bought a couple of them. Imagine my surprise when I
    >> googled ososweetonions.com and discovered that they are grown in
    >> Chili.

    >
    > It's understanable a cook would spell it Chili, but the country is
    > Chile. The onions can and are grown elsewhere.
    >
    >> How do they get away with saying USA on the sticker with no indication
    >> of being grown in Chili?

    >
    > By growing them in the US.
    >
    > On the website you indicate above is this quote:
    >
    > "Not only are our world-class onions grown in Chile, but we have also
    > found an ideal growing area in Weslaco, Texas. These domestically grown
    > onions feature the same Chilean size, taste, and quality, but allow our
    > sweet onion season to be extended all the way through May."



    Weslaco in in the Rio Grande Valley and Becca and I go there often. It
    is amazing to see acres and acres of onions. The last time we were
    there, we bought a 35 pound bag of onions for $7. Janet W. lives very
    near there.

    George L

  4. #4
    gtr Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On 2012-06-22 17:53:54 +0000, George Leppla said:

    > Weslaco in in the Rio Grande Valley and Becca and I go there often. It
    > is amazing to see acres and acres of onions. The last time we were
    > there, we bought a 35 pound bag of onions for $7. Janet W. lives very
    > near there.


    So their good. Vidalia good, right? Or are they significantly different?
    >



  5. #5
    George Leppla Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On 6/22/2012 1:07 PM, gtr wrote:
    > On 2012-06-22 17:53:54 +0000, George Leppla said:
    >
    >> Weslaco in in the Rio Grande Valley and Becca and I go there often. It
    >> is amazing to see acres and acres of onions. The last time we were
    >> there, we bought a 35 pound bag of onions for $7. Janet W. lives very
    >> near there.

    >
    > So their good. Vidalia good, right? Or are they significantly different?
    >>

    >



    I'm not sure if we ever got those specific onions. I think most of the
    ones grown down there are Texas 1015 and they are as good as Vidalia.
    I'm not fussy about which onions I buy so I really haven't paid attention.

    George L

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 11:07:17 -0700, gtr <[email protected]> wrote:

    > So their good.


    So "THEIR" good?

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  7. #7
    gtr Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On 2012-06-22 18:37:03 +0000, sf said:

    > On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 11:07:17 -0700, gtr <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> So their good.

    >
    > So "THEIR" good?


    I'm sorry I meant to type "they're" good. I have a tendency to such
    words and have found over the years that I swap the spelling of words
    that only vaguely sound the same, or sound the same only with a Texas
    accent. It's a curious thing and I associate it with being a musician
    all my life.

    Again my sincerest apologies.


  8. #8
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    gtr wrote:
    >
    > On 2012-06-22 17:53:54 +0000, George Leppla said:
    >
    > > Weslaco in in the Rio Grande Valley and Becca and I go there often. It
    > > is amazing to see acres and acres of onions. The last time we were
    > > there, we bought a 35 pound bag of onions for $7. Janet W. lives very
    > > near there.

    >
    > So their good. Vidalia good, right? Or are they significantly different?
    > >


    Validia onions are extremely mild..you can eat them like an apple. I prefer
    the stronger onions.... I buy yellow mostly but sometimes will pay extra for
    the stronger red onions.

    Anyway, a 35lb bag of onions for $7 is almost inconceivable to me. What a
    great deal!

    Gary

  9. #9
    George Leppla Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On 6/22/2012 1:57 PM, Gary wrote:
    > gtr wrote:
    >>
    >> On 2012-06-22 17:53:54 +0000, George Leppla said:
    >>
    >>> Weslaco in in the Rio Grande Valley and Becca and I go there often. It
    >>> is amazing to see acres and acres of onions. The last time we were
    >>> there, we bought a 35 pound bag of onions for $7. Janet W. lives very
    >>> near there.

    >>
    >> So their good. Vidalia good, right? Or are they significantly different?
    >>>

    >
    > Validia onions are extremely mild..you can eat them like an apple. I prefer
    > the stronger onions.... I buy yellow mostly but sometimes will pay extra for
    > the stronger red onions.
    >
    > Anyway, a 35lb bag of onions for $7 is almost inconceivable to me. What a
    > great deal!



    Whenever we go down there we visit a few farm markets and roadside
    stands and load up with whatever is in season. If we go in the winter,
    ruby red grapefruit are usually $4 to $5 for an 18 pound bag. Limes are
    usually 20 for $1. I think Becca got a bag full of poblano peppers for
    $2 once.

    I love that area and we gave serious thought to moving there.

    George L

  10. #10
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 10:32:15 -0700, gtr wrote:

    > It's understanable a cook would spell it Chili, but the country is
    > Chile.


    Keep in mind she's a teacher. Or was. Now she's an "educational
    consultant".

    > On the website you indicate above is this quote:
    >
    > "Not only are our world-class onions grown in Chile, but we have also
    > found an ideal growing area in Weslaco, Texas. These domestically grown
    > onions feature the same Chilean size, taste, and quality, but allow our
    > sweet onion season to be extended all the way through May."


    It also says they have Oso Sweet Vidalia's grown in Georgia.

    -sw

  11. #11
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 11:37:03 -0700, sf wrote:

    > On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 11:07:17 -0700, gtr <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> So their good.

    >
    > So "THEIR" good?


    So much for returning the gracious correction you made for her.

    -sw

  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 11:43:45 -0700, gtr <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 2012-06-22 18:37:03 +0000, sf said:
    >
    > > On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 11:07:17 -0700, gtr <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> So their good.

    > >
    > > So "THEIR" good?

    >
    > I'm sorry I meant to type "they're" good. I have a tendency to such
    > words and have found over the years that I swap the spelling of words
    > that only vaguely sound the same, or sound the same only with a Texas
    > accent. It's a curious thing and I associate it with being a musician
    > all my life.
    >
    > Again my sincerest apologies.


    I was just pointing out that when you criticize others for their
    spelling mistakes, it invariably comes back to bite you in the butt.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  13. #13
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On 6/22/2012 2:43 PM, gtr wrote:
    >
    > I'm sorry I meant to type "they're" good. I have a tendency to such
    > words and have found over the years that I swap the spelling of words
    > that only vaguely sound the same, or sound the same only with a Texas
    > accent. It's a curious thing and I associate it with being a musician
    > all my life.


    I do that sometimes too and since it one of my pet peeves, I have to
    laugh hard at myself when I do it. Sometimes I'll see that I wrote "to"
    rather than "too" and that's a pet peeve as well.

  14. #14
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On 6/22/2012 2:57 PM, Gary wrote:
    > gtr wrote:
    >>
    >> On 2012-06-22 17:53:54 +0000, George Leppla said:
    >>
    >>> Weslaco in in the Rio Grande Valley and Becca and I go there often. It
    >>> is amazing to see acres and acres of onions. The last time we were
    >>> there, we bought a 35 pound bag of onions for $7. Janet W. lives very
    >>> near there.

    >>
    >> So their good. Vidalia good, right? Or are they significantly different?
    >>>

    >
    > Validia onions are extremely mild..you can eat them like an apple. I prefer
    > the stronger onions.... I buy yellow mostly but sometimes will pay extra for
    > the stronger red onions.
    >
    > Anyway, a 35lb bag of onions for $7 is almost inconceivable to me. What a
    > great deal!


    For some reason I thought most Vidalia onions come from Georgia.


  15. #15
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 16:00:52 -0700, sf wrote:

    > On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 11:43:45 -0700, gtr <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2012-06-22 18:37:03 +0000, sf said:
    >>
    >>> On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 11:07:17 -0700, gtr <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> So their good.
    >>>
    >>> So "THEIR" good?

    >>
    >> I'm sorry I meant to type "they're" good. I have a tendency to such
    >> words and have found over the years that I swap the spelling of words
    >> that only vaguely sound the same, or sound the same only with a Texas
    >> accent. It's a curious thing and I associate it with being a musician
    >> all my life.
    >>
    >> Again my sincerest apologies.

    >
    > I was just pointing out that when you criticize others for their
    > spelling mistakes, it invariably comes back to bite you in the butt.


    I'm sure she also meant to thank you for explaining to her what the
    website clearly said in several places.

    -sw

  16. #16
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On 6/22/2012 3:07 PM, George Leppla wrote:
    >
    > Whenever we go down there we visit a few farm markets and roadside
    > stands and load up with whatever is in season. If we go in the winter,
    > ruby red grapefruit are usually $4 to $5 for an 18 pound bag. Limes are
    > usually 20 for $1. I think Becca got a bag full of poblano peppers for
    > $2 once.
    >
    > I love that area and we gave serious thought to moving there.


    One of my nieces now lives in southern Texas, Corpus Christi area, and
    she posted her recent haul from something called the Fruit King. Wish
    we had something like that here.


  17. #17
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    Cheryl wrote:

    > For some reason I thought most Vidalia onions come from Georgia.


    If they're not grown in Vidalia (in Georgia), they're not Vidalia
    onions. The owners of the breed have some kind of lock on the name.


  18. #18
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On 6/22/2012 8:02 PM, George M. Middius wrote:
    > Cheryl wrote:
    >
    >> For some reason I thought most Vidalia onions come from Georgia.

    >
    > If they're not grown in Vidalia (in Georgia), they're not Vidalia
    > onions. The owners of the breed have some kind of lock on the name.


    One time a woman I worked with had to pick up Vidalia onions for
    her soon to be mil. I thought maybe Vidalias weren't in season.
    She said Oh, they probably get them from Brazil or somewhere.
    Funny. Anyway, I told her there might be other sweet onions, they
    are usually not round, but a flatter shape.

    nancy

  19. #19
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > I usually buy the bags of smaller onions because I prefer being able
    > to use it up quickly and not have a cut onion sitting around in my
    > refrigerator. However, this week the price of bagged onions was too
    > high for me and the loose, larger onions looked interesting. They
    > were flat at both ends, like a giant cippolini onion, and the sticker
    > said USA - so I bought a couple of them. Imagine my surprise when I
    > googled ososweetonions.com and discovered that they are grown in
    > Chili. How do they get away with saying USA on the sticker with no
    > indication of being grown in Chili?
    >
    > --
    > Food is an important part of a balanced diet.


    I don't know aboutOso sweet onions. Sweet vidalia onions (from Georgia) are
    about to come to market. They're usually rather large and very sweet, for
    yellow onions. They work great in any dish that calls for sweet onions.

    In this area it's harvest season for early crops. Tomatoes are being picked
    and sent out in trucks. They're definitely red tomatoes. There's a
    processing plant down the road where they cook tomatoes and then can them.
    These places only operate few times a year. It depends on the season and
    the harvest.

    Jill


  20. #20
    gtr Guest

    Default Re: Oso sweet onion

    On 2012-06-22 23:00:52 +0000, sf said:

    > On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 11:43:45 -0700, gtr <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 2012-06-22 18:37:03 +0000, sf said:
    >>
    >>> On Fri, 22 Jun 2012 11:07:17 -0700, gtr <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> So their good.
    >>>
    >>> So "THEIR" good?

    >>
    >> I'm sorry I meant to type "they're" good. I have a tendency to such
    >> words and have found over the years that I swap the spelling of words
    >> that only vaguely sound the same, or sound the same only with a Texas
    >> accent. It's a curious thing and I associate it with being a musician
    >> all my life.
    >>
    >> Again my sincerest apologies.

    >
    > I was just pointing out that when you criticize others for their
    > spelling mistakes, it invariably comes back to bite you in the butt.


    If I criticize others for their spelling I'll try to remember that.


Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32